Get Social:

Travis Rice Creates Installations Of Rainbow-Like Waves Made From Thousands Of Pieces Of Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

Travis Rice - Shredded Paper

The installations of artist Travis Rice crush you with their intense, waves of color. Made from thousands of pieces of shredded paper, his installations resemble cascading rainbows as they explode from the ceiling and swallow up their surroundings. Each installation of his is a 3-dimensional painting, using colored paper as paint.  Rice uses these tiny paper strips and applies them like paint suspended in the air, adding an element of motion to his work. Being interested in mark-making, this artist uses a balance of order and chaos to form such complex installations. The color-strips are grouped together in his work to create a larger body of color, using the chaotic and unpredictable part to construct the larger whole.

Rice’s installations roll like waves of water from the ceiling to the floor in beams of color. It is as if they possess a life of their own, becoming living organisms that seem to expand and consume everything in their path. Many of his pieces form hills and ripples, resembling landscapes and bodies of water. The thousands of pieces of paper imply a constant motion, even though the installation itself is static.  Travis Rice further explains his artistic process and what inspires him to use such a tedious, yet dynamic method in his work.

I am interested in the most fundamental element of the graphic arts, the mark. I am currently exploring the idea of marks as objects and modules that repeat and evolve into larger forms. My installations explore marks as modules that accumulate to create ordered masses. The approach is similar to that of the impressionist painter but the brush stroke has been replaced by individual thin strips of paper that are the resultant product of a mechanical shredder.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Animals Posing Provocatively Set A Tone Of Tranquility Inspired By Surrealism, Executed By Juul Kraijer

Juul kraijer photography 5Juul kraijer photography 4 Juul kraijer photography 10

Juul kraijer photography 6

A living snake wrapped around a face, a dozen of ladybugs, a scorpio and an howl using that same face as a structure. That is the set up of a fantastic photography series by Juul Kraijer called ‘Penumbrae’. The titles evokes darkness and shadows. It’s what we are getting visually and internally. The artist is inspired to manipulate reality, in the end, she gets to manipulate us, the viewer, in a disconcerting way.

The models are just the vehicle for ideas, they are not to be considered like portraits, nor are the animals. Clearly the main subject is twosome: the fusion between the animal and the face and the dark background. The intriguing face/animal amalgamation stands out from the shade, as if it had been sitting in the dark for an eternity. It will appear for a brief moment and then will go back into the gloom exactly the way we saw it at first, for all times.

Imperturbable tranquillity is the general tone. Despite a unsettling scenario that could create an anxious atmosphere, the calm sported by the faces leaves a mark of grace, the same expression that is usually found in Renaissance portraiture.
Juul Kraijer is fascinated by surrealist photography, hence the execution of her series. Surrealism is about getting rid of the mind and the reason to only let the imagination dive and drive into the interpretation of the picture. Ideas and dogmas cannot be suggested, personal understanding cannot be captured.

The artist has created provocative poses. By elevating the animals on top of the faces she questions the hierarchies between humans and animals, models and accessories. The fact that the roles are reversed creates intensity, almost a tension. Comparably to the symbol of eternity described above, the use of the mirrors creates oddity and redundancy, which extends the feeling coming out from the photographs.
The viewer is tempted to look away but there’s an indescribable attraction, a desire to see more.

Juul Kraijer is represented by The Wapping Bankside Project in London, UK. The photographs are available in books which can be order here.
Copyright: Juul Kraijer, Courtesy: The Wapping Project Bankside

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits

Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

Currently Trending

Alicia Watkins’ Clever And Cute Microbe Embroidery

Alicia Watkins

Alicia Watkins

Alicia Watkins

Alicia Watkins

There’s not much information about Alicia Watkins‘ scientific embroidery, but we can all agree the project is a fun way to identify potentially harmful microbes. From anthrax to salmonella, herpes, e.coli, toxoplasma, mono, botulism, and the common cold, Watkins has colorfully cross-stiched many well-known bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Some of these dreadful microbes almost appear cute by Watkins’ careful hand, associating the warmth and comfort that cross-stitching evokes with the coldness of threatening diseases and sicknesses. Watkins’ Etsy store, appropriately named Watty’s Wall Stuff, has these stiched microbes available for purchase at $19.99 each, along with other clever and pop culture influenced cross-stitch work. She also takes custom orders, as well as making some of her patterns available for purchase. (via this isn’t happiness)

Currently Trending

The Simpsons parody

Not really sure who made this or where it came from, but it’s pretty great. Marge is also played by a man.

Currently Trending

James Hopkins

James Hopkins
Every piece of James Hopkins’ work challenges the limits of human cognition. My favorites from his series (though they’re all really cool) are “Balanced Works”, many of which pieces in this feature various types of alcohol- drinking and balance? – good combination, and “Perspective Sculptures” containing erratically proportioned instruments that would make up a rock band.

Currently Trending

Damien Hirst Made Artwork That’s Actually Good

Washington

Washington

Paris

Paris

Detail

Detail

Rio

Rio

Damien Hirst’s exhibition at White Cube Sao Paolo, called Black Scalpel Cityscapes, is surprisingly compelling conceptually and technically intriguing. Hirst, though I’m sure I don’t really need to tell you this, reader, is a very divisive artist. His practice is a slippery one. It’s difficult to dismiss him, because he’s carved out a big space for himself in commercial galleries, but to some work, in example his spot paintings, feel a bit like an emperor wears no clothes scenario. It’s easy to argue that Hirst’s legacy is the success of his practice itself as a sort of art piece, and it would be true that he’s figured out some notable strategy for success, but whether it’s particularly honest or admirable is a question often dismissed by the powers that profit from Hirst or uphold his ideology.

In contrast to all this, Hirst’s most recent series is unexpectedly insightful. He recreates bird’s-eye view images of international cities using paint, surgical tools, and other industrial instruments. The materials for the Rio painting consist of Scalpel blades, skin graft blades, zips, stitching needles, aluminum filings, pins, stainless steel studs, fish hooks, steel wire cutting spool and gloss paint on canvas. On the White Cube website, Hirst’s statement reads:

Hirst investigates subjects pertaining to the sometimes-disquieting realities of modern life – surveillance, urbanisation, globalisation and the virtual nature of conflict – as well as elements relating to the universal human condition, such as our inability to arrest physical decay.

In the paintings, manmade features and natural elements such as buildings, rivers and roads are depicted in scalpels as well as razor blades, hooks, iron filings and safety-pins, all set against black backgrounds. For this exhibition, Hirst selected 17 cities, which are either sites of recent conflict, cities relating to the artist’s own life, or centres of economic, political or religious significance

What’s exciting about this series is that the themes Hirst claims to be examining are clear and his execution is effective. The paintings are visually impressive and also hold up conceptually, and most importantly, they tackle relevant political issues. Basically, it’s not bullshit. Congratulations, Damien Hirst. (Via The Fox is Black)

Currently Trending

White Noise, The Digital Sculptures That Mixes Fashion Photography And 3D Animation

marie_05_04_marie-flipflop-wire_01 marie_05_black_4 snapshot09_0

Fashion photographer Per Zennstrom & 3D artist Torsten Weese collaborate on a multimedia project, White Noise Shores, that juxtaposes 3D technology with old-school photography in order to create sculpture compositions.

These beautiful shots resemble human bodies that mesh with what seems to be the digital fabric of what makes the basic 3D animation. The stunning compositions are strictly rendered in neutral colors and, at times, its vague composition is reminiscent of early abstraction (in that it is not fully abstract since it is somewhat figurative).

After the real-life photoshoot, the 40-50 still frames captured were uploaded into the free AutoDesk 123D Catch software which allows anyone with an internet connection to create real 3D models of virtually any object. The software stitches the images together and produces a 3D model in about 30 minutes.

The model acquired through the AutoDesk was then“sculpted by hand” in Sculptris to refine and enhance the digital sculpture. The next step was to hand the model over to Thorsten Japser Weese and his team at Recom-CGI for processing and editing. The camera flight and the rendering for the ANIMATION is done inf VRED professional and the passes were comped in NUKE and got little FX in After Effects. The team at Recom rendered a number of stills, video and 3D models which were then brought back to Per Zennstrom for final editing in Premiere and After Effects.

(via Eternal Optimist)

Currently Trending