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Kimberly Clark’s Severed Head

Artist collective Kimberly Clark present the hedonistic but also deeply disturbing image of an exaggerated nightlife, on the borderline of excess. Scenes from parties, static images or movements in suspension and representations of blissfulness, provocation, glamour, desolation, boredom, stimulation, the concentrated remains of a nightlong euphoria jumbled together with cosmetics (empty Marlboro packets, bottles and cans of beer, lipstick, etc), compose a kind of group portrait (or self-portrait?) with explicit signs of psychological fluctuation. At the centre is always the female figure, trendy attractive, narcissistic and, at the same time, a live-size simulacrum, juxtaposing stereotypes of the female identity with shocking views of the night and mounds of consumer rubbish.-Thanos Stathopoulos

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Tone Matrix

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Andre Michelle created this fun and simple sinewave synthesizer triggered by an ordinary 16 step sequencer. Each triggered step causes a force on the underlaying wave-map, which makes it more cute. It sounds great and you can make some rad designs. I made four designs and shot them in sequence with my iPhone QuadCamera App. What can you do?

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Artist’s Digitally Enhanced Photographs Look Like Expressionist Paintings

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Japanese art photographer FUKE P-San transforms his photographs into emotional experiences by applying expressive color palettes. In FUKE’s photographs, color and light becomes the subject of the work, as opposed to an objective characteristic. FUKE photographs the world around him, then uses digital color and light effects to give the photograph a painterly aesthetic, one that mirrors the beauty he sees and feels when experiencing the scenery he encounters. He says, “There is so much beauty in our everyday life that goes unseen simple because we develop a different sense of how we value beauty often influenced by our every day life routine.”
FUKE’s color palette and composition evokes the work of artists like Edvard Munch, Egon Schiele, Vincent van Gogh, and Claude Monet, and registers an emotionality not frequently seen in photographic work; this is largely due to his work’s painterly qualities. He hopes his images enhance viewers’ perceptions of the world, and influences the way they perceive beauty.
“Open new windows in your mind and heart, notice and catch the beauty of ordinary small things, watch them well and find a way to make this beauty even bigger. Find the mystery in everything; feel it and this will open your heart to new worlds that you previously thought they never existed. Art can give us Happiness, and help us communicate with ourselves and others to a higher level.” (via cross connect and life treasure collector)

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Leandro Lima

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Brazilian artist Leandro Lima‘s illustrations are so playful, complex and balanced all at once. I love how every element in his illustrations can stand on its own, and your eye is constantly bouncing all over the image. He does a lot of work for magazines, but most recently, he designed this for a bank. I’m not sure I really think “bank” when I see these (and I’m still working on the significance of some of the imagery, like that tear that’s split 50-50), but Brazilian banks definitely must be more fun than those we have in the US.

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Sky Ferreira Let’s us Preview Her Ghost EP and I Have it on Repeat!

If you haven’t heard of Sky Ferreira yet, that will soon change because she will be everywhere. I was lucky enough to catch her first ever live performance last month at the Bootleg and while she was visibly nervous, the songs sounded great. Now we get the chance to preview her Ghost EP (official release October 16th on Capitol Records ) that Cass McCombs, Jon Brion, and Greg Kurstin all helped produce. Don’t forget to check out the obligatory Terry Richardson photo and the video for Everything is Embarrassing after the jump.

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Czlowiek Kamera’s Surreal Photography Manipulations

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Czlowiek Kamera is not this photographer’s real name. In Russian the name means “human-cam” or “cam-man,” and was sourced from Vertov’s “Man with a Movie Camera.” This human-mechanical fusion can be identified throughout Kamera’s compositions, at least in the way he fuses his human subjects with the camera’s manipulation of them. His photographs are surreal and mystical, and remind me a bit of Kyle Thompson’s aesthetic. Kamera specializes in recording live music performances, including artists Sigur Rós and Fever Ray. Check out his Flickr for more photos.

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Julia Sinelnikova Asks Us if Fairies Are Good Or Bad

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In her exhibition “Black Fairy Egg Nest,” Julia Sinelnikova asks us if fairies are good or bad. Experienced as a ritual site with candles and stones, “Black Fairy Egg Nest” feels like a secret den where winged creatures could emerge at any moment. The primary piece hovering overhead is a nest of hand cut resin light sculptures dripping into the exhibition space. A pregnant mass leaks thin glowing strands and dark stones dangle towards the ground below.

But while there is a medieval and religious feel to the work,  Sinelnikova is more broadly concerned with the distinction between who we are and how we present ourselves to the world. Her use of a fairy as the icon of the work symbolizes the contradictions inherent in our identities. As Sinelnikova points out in her artist statement, fairies are represented as both benevolent creatures who grant wishes and tricksters who can thwart even the most noble of plans. In this way fairies seem to be like us, flying between the light and the dark.

“Black Fairy Nest Egg” is part of Sinelnikova’s larger “Fairy Organs” work and includes sculpture, video and performance. “Conjuring Rebirth,” performed by Sinelnikova aka The Oracle and Xenolith Yolita aka Culttastic uses the glowing, dangling sculptures as a location for mystical curiosity, acquiescence and frustration. “Meditation on Suffering” centers around a glowing square where multiple women decked in shimmering foil move in concert with whispering voices in a neon lit disco. “Sentinel Seraphim” moves the multiplied women out of the geometric world of “Meditation” and into nature where the foil then takes on the likeness of wings.

Julia Sinelnikova is an artist and curator working in New York City. She has had solo exhibitions in Brooklyn, Austin, Houston, Barcelona, and Oulu (Finland). She recently curated “LEMNIVERSE: Vector Gallery at Art Basel” at SELECT Fair, Miami Beach and “Seeking Space 2014” at the Active Space, Brooklyn.

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Psychedelic Post-Pre Apocalyptic Mysticism in Paint

Kara Joslyn

Kara Joslyn

Kara Joslyn

Oakland-based artist Kara Joslyn’s work is paradoxically pop: combining bright, neo-geo, child-of-the-90’s color and pattern with dark subject matter that is somewhat empty, yet mystical—almost pre-ancient. The forms that take shape in her work seem to be tied together by a series of faint mythologies, maybe containing traces of some vague storyline buried in alien artifacts.

Her process begins with “sourcing photographic reference, which she curates by pairing selective images in dialogue with each other. This source material is then photocopied in black and white and rendered in paint—a document of a document, serving as an allegory for painting.” Her surface treatment is nice, and color choices (while not easily photographable), hit like a laser beam in front of the work.

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