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Dines

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London based Dines is a graphic, type and interactive mono-named designer. Whether his designs are destined for commercial industry or for more personal musings, his bright, active voice rings loud, yet harmonious, through each project- a stamp of his personal design style. You can catch up with his freshest work and news via his blog.

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Above

6a00d834cad15053ef013480028618970c-800wi Above is an international street artist who is widely known for his social and political stencils, wooden “arrow mobile” installations, and witty word play paintings. His work has been seen all over Europe and the US.

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Olympia Le-Tan

olympia le tan

I don’t normally go in for crafty stuff, or faux-vintage design, or, um, purses, but I have to say I am really digging these embroidered purses from Olympia Le-Tan. They may appear to be books, but as style.com reports “The ‘books’ in question are actually rectangular box clutches that feature hand-knit copies of the covers of some favorite reads.” These make me wish I carried a purse, err, “rectangular box clutch.” Maybe she can make some laptop bags or something? Or some actual book covers? Come on Penguin, commission this woman!

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B/D Flickr Pool- Maria Lamar

maria lamar

 

I found the work of Maria Lamar during my weekly look through of the B/D Flickr Pool. I love how Maria’s drawings are delicate, vague, figurative and abstract all at the same time! Make sure to join the B/D Flickr Pool. You never know who we’re going to post next!

 

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B/D’s Best of 2010- Yellena James

Allusion

Allusion

Yellena James uses pen and ink to create truly exquisite forms. What starts out as a single shape or line blossoms into magnificent mushroom-jellyfish hybrids, feeding my affinity for all things under the sea! Her artwork has been so perfectly described as “colorful arrangements of organic shapes and tangled lines (which) are at once floral and alien, organic and sci-fi, crafty and fantastic.” With each piece she tries to “create an intimate world that posesses its own ethos and its own emotional range.”

She’s done illustration work for clients such as Anthropologie and Nike, and her work has appeared in numerous art and design resources and publications like Vogue Australia and Giant Robot.

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Artist Interview: Jeremiah Maddock

Jeremiah Maddock is a hard guy to pin down. Many have spoken of him as some sort of ghost- a shadowy figure that passes through bars and cafes with a suitcase full of muted drawings, and an unknown past. This legend surrounding the artist, who lives -most of the time- in New York City, creating richly patterned mixed media works populated with ghoulish creatures and tramps, is likely a product of his obvious lack of desire for external validation. It’s clear that Maddock, who has no personal website, maintains a very pure process; he is interested more in the act of creating -and the motivations behind such an act- than any finished product.

I caught up with Jeremiah in-between his extensive travels throughout the interior of the country. Read the interview after the jump, which includes the artist’s thoughts on steez-biting Mayans, art fairs with Josh Keyes in high school, and collaborating with the dead.

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Orlando Estrada

Orlando Estrada’s photographs explore how contemporary objects and images can form a personal mythology and iconography.

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Ancient Japanese Scrolls From The Edo Period Depict Farting Competitions (NSFW)

Edo Period Japanese Fart Scrolls Edo Period Japanese Fart Scrolls Edo Period Japanese Fart Scrolls Edo Period Japanese Fart Scrolls

Believe it or not, these very old drawings of Japanese men farting are not Photoshopped. The images were produced during the Japanese Edo period (1603 – 1868), and they depcit what is called he-gassen or “farting competition.” They show men shooting noxious blasts of gas towards other men, women, and animals (including a cat!). Seemingly, the force of the farts is so great that it the targets turn topsy-turvy when hit.

These drawings are peculiar, and not having a vast knowledge of Japanese culture makes their meaning even more alluring to me. Luckily, the website Naruhodo explains the historical context. They write, “similar drawings were used to ridicule westerners towards the end of the Edo period, with images depicting the westerners blown away by Japanese farts.”

The individual images originally appear on a scroll, which has obviously been sectioned off today. You can view it in its entirety here. It’s funny to think that farts have always been a source of amusement, even across time periods and cultures. (Via Dangerous Minds and Naruhodo)

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