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Out Now! Beautiful/Decay The Seven Deadly Sins Book!

Don’t forget to get your copy of the limited edition Beautiful/Decay The Seven Deadly Sins Book!

Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Pride, and Envy have been explored—and challenged—for centuries by artists, scholars, and writers. In this issue of Beautiful/Decay, you’ll find artists who explore these themes through a contemporary lens, either by explicitly calling out those deemed guilty of committing one of the Seven Deadly Sins, or by turning the sweeping notion of sin right on its head.

James Gobel tackles Pride through felt portraits of colorfully clad, sexually charged, plus-size bears, and continuing the exploration of Lust, we have the raw and lascivious Polaroids of Jeremy Kost. View Tom Littleson’s bloody portraiture drawings and their relationship with Wrath. See how cover artists Tim Noble & Sue Webster’s adept use of personified garbage channels Gluttony. Libby Black’s paint-and-paper sculptures replicate Envy-inducing luxury brand goods, while paintings and drawings from Brendan Danielsson address the social and physical epidemic of Sloth. Finally, Greed lies at the center of Ghost of a Dream’s hypnotic sculptural art and immersive installations. We’ve also invited international artists, illustrators, and designers to create original pieces for our Project Pages based on all seven sins.

Other featured artists: Carolyn Janssen, Okay Mountain, Colette Robbins, Cleon Peterson, Micah Ganske, Zoe Charlton, Penelope Gottlieb, Paul Mullins, Keith Puccinelli, Travis Somerville, Kara Maria, Aideen Barry, Travis Collinson, Geoffrey Chasedy, John Knuth.

Each copy of Beautiful/Decay: The Seven Deadly Sins comes blind packed with either a zine by Terence Hannum or Heather Benjamin or a limited edition silk screen print by Paul Nudd!

GET YOUR COPY HERE!

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More from Bryan Schnelle…

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B/D featured artist Bryan Schnelle a while back on the blog, and he recently sent us these ‘zines/brochures of his work.

If the black mask on the cover wasn’t an indicator to you that theme was unorthodox, then I don’t know what is! It’s definitely interesting how he places a black mask over the faces of his subjects. In the one instance that he doesn’t, he removes the model’s eyes. Just a little creepy. Maybe it’s a shot at the fashion industry or maybe a comment on the concept of beauty itself. In any case, Bryan Schnelle’s work has definitely struck a nerve with me.

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Jihyun Park’s Intricate Drawings Are Created With Thousands Of Tiny Holes Burnt With Incense

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South Korean artist Jihyun Park creates incredibly complex images by burning minute holes in rice paper with incense sticks. He then mounts the finished ‘drawings’ onto varnished canvases. The final results are beautifully serene images of trees, mountains, clouds, forests and branches. As a kind of reverse pointillism, Park is interested in the contrasts between empty space  and positive space, or by taking something away (parts of the paper, and the incense stick) to create something new (the image).

Inspired by the books Gulliver’s Travels, Utopia, and Erewhon and after seeing the Japanese animated movie Castle in the Sky, Park became interested in the ideas of utopia and harmony. He expands these connections in his work further:

My recent work, Incense Series, focuses on this relationship while searching for the promised harmonic balance that utopia brings. Ironically, the word “utopia” in Korean is “Yi Sang Hwang” and “Hwang” means “incense”. (Source)

Park also talks about the ideas of positive and negative further. He says the shadows created by the holes in the paper are playing off of the light reflected from behind them. To him this is a fine example of Yin and Yang and two opposites who complicate and strengthen each other. He also chooses to outline his subjects or to fill them in – working with reverses in an aesthetic sense as well.

The subjects addressed in my work range from the natural world to memories of the past, reflecting the constant physical and emotional changes in our environment. It is my hope that the “moments” I captures of my subjects are ones when they are at their most ideal– true utopias. While drawing them with the incense, I am “holding” a split moment of harmony in my hands. (Source)

(Via Bored Panda)

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New Work by Jan Kalwejt

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Jan Kalwejt, who contributed the amazing “Lung Music” shirt has a bunch of new works up on his site. Check ’em out!

 

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Melissa Godoy-Nieto’s Uses Traditional Mexican Imagery In Untraditional Ways

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Melissa Godoy-Nieto is a multidisciplinary Mexican artist and designer based in Brooklyn, NY.  Born in Tijuana, Mexico, Godoy-Nieto incorporates pre-hispanic history, art and hieroglyphics with traditional crafts and materials that she uses in untraditional ways.  For her installation at SPRING/BREAK art fair earlier this year Godoy-Nieto painted the inside of a closet with a bright mix of mystical South American imagery, focusing partly on life, and partly on death.  Though she references the vibrant palate, dynamic and hand crafted aesthetic of Mexican culture, her works employ unusual techniques and structures, making the final product relevant and contemporary.

Her “textiles,” which she refers to as paintings, incorporate imagery from traditional Mexican imagery and patterns, but are made with untraditional materials.  Taking the concept a step further, Godoy-Nieto will sometimes link her paintings to spray paint cans using hand-dyed yarn and pushpins.  Describing the works as “experimental murals,” Godoy-Nieto toys with a viewer’s sense of how the work was made; conventional imagery is presented as being created in an unconventional way.  Initially, a viewer might believe the work is made with spray paint, but then he realizes the spray paint is yarn and had nothing to do with forming the actual image.  By challenging expectation and altering dimension, Godoy-Nieto’s process directs the way in which a viewer might interact with or perceive the work, and thus the way he might consider traditional iconography within a contemporary context.

Godoy-Nieto is also the co-founder of The Poetry Club Art Space and Head Visual artist for The Tablets.

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Eleanor Davies’ Giant Pom Pom Made With Over 200 Colors Is On Steroids

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In artist Eleanor Davies’ piece titled Over 200 Beautiful Colors, she crafts a traditional yarn pom pom (like something you’d see on a beanie), but on steroids. Using wool, newspaper, and rope, Davies wraps donut-shaped discs with yarn and stacks them on top of one another. They become a mountain of wound wool, and finally she cuts the edges of every disc. This releases the fibers around the cardboard, and they form a larger-than-life ball of fringe.

The result of this tedious effort is something that you want to touch and maybe even hug. And, that’s Davies’ intention. She wants the viewer to desire an interaction with it. But, at the same time, she also wants to you to feel some sort of repulsion to it. Even though it’s a magnificent and incredible piece, you compare it to what other smaller, more perky-looking pom poms look like. This, in all its glory, droops as gravity has got the best of it. “The oscillation between attraction and repulsion is experienced through the disruption of taste values,” Davies writes in an artist statement. “Sculptures seek attention and flaunt themselves in such a way that they ask for it.”

The slow and meticulous construction of Over 200 Beautiful Colors is akin to a beautiful regime. Davies goes on to say:

In appropriating the sculpting techniques of hairdressing; extensions and highlights are added to slowly modify and enhance a sculpture’s look. The compulsive desire to reconfigure, reinvent, re-cut and re-colour is due to the satisfaction gained through succumbing to the lure of the surface. The process of overworking the sculptural surface is self indulgent and my practice embraces and revels in this.

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Awesome Video Of The Day- Barry McGee Interview

One of the most influential artists (Did you know Beautiful/Decay is named after a Barry McGee quote) of his generation Barry McGee was recently asked to reinstall a work of his at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art for their 75th Anniversary retrospective. What ended up happening was an installation that not only incorporated the original work created in 1996 but also sampled new work created days before the installation. In this piece we talk with Barry about the preservation of impermanent art and how reinvention keeps him excited.

Video by Creative Lives.

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Ernest Zacharevic’s Street Art Plays With Its Neighborhood

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Perhaps more so than any other form of art, street art has the capacity to engage with the neighborhood its found in.   The work of artist Ernest Zacharevic, also known simply as ZACH, takes this to a literal extent.  ZACH’s murals are often found interacting with features of the building or objects nearby.  A bike leaning against the wall becomes a vehicle for a spray painted child or dock posts become giant pencils.  ZACH highlights the life of the city in a way by actually making it come alive.  The walls seem poised to interact with passersby, and encourage engagement.

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