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Andreas Franke’s Haunting And Surreal Series Imagines Underwater Shipwrecks Full of Life

Shipwrecks

Shipwrecks

Shipwrecks

Shipwrecks

Austrian photographer and diver Andreas Franke has created a hauntingly beautiful series of images called “The Sinking World” in which he layers studio photographs over underwater ship wrecks. In 2009, the USS Vandenberg was lowered into the ocean off the coast of Florida to serve as an artificial reef. When Franke encountered the ship while diving, he was inspired by the vessel’s haunting emptiness. For the Vandenberg project, Franke superimposes photographs of recognizable, everyday scenes; the studio figures appear ghostly, as if they are re-enacting scenes that previously took place in a lively atmosphere. The empty ship becomes a site that reveals snapshots of a lost, surreal world, discovering the humanity that lurks among the ships hallways, passages, and decks. Franke creates an unexpected dream world where a viewer is pulled into a strange, new, and fantastical place.

This sunken ship not only provides the setting for Franke’s superimpositions, but also serves as a gallery where divers can swim up to Franke’s work, viewing his photographs in the very place that inspired his images. From the project’s website,

“The pictures engender extreme polarities: the soft, secretive underwater emptiness of sleeping shipwrecks is paired with real, authentic sceneries full of liveliness and vigor, thus creating a new world, equally bizarre and irresistibly entangling…

 

These spectacular underwater galleries make divers fall under their spell and display the work of the ocean itself. During the weeks and months under water the ocean bequeaths impressive, peerless traces to the pictures. It adorns them with a certain, peculiar patina, endowing them with the countenance of bizarre evanescence and transfiguring them into rare beauties.”

Franke has also created two other series of shipwreck images using period piece studio photography, as opposed to the everyday activities of the Vandenberg project. For the SS Stavronikita shipwreck, Franke superimposes photographs of people dressed in clothing and participating in activities evocative of Rococo. For the USS Mohawk, a WWII shipwreck, Franke imagines what life on the ship might look like, and creates a series of images in which the sailors have returned to haunt the ship. (via slow art day)

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Musical Rain Gutters Wall

Artist always need to make their homes different. We collect designer furniture, find old design treasures at flea markets and estate sales, and go the extra mile to make our homes uniquely ours. Apparently the same goes for the artsy neighborhood of Neustadt Kunsthofpassage in Dresden, Germany. Designed by Christoph Roßner, Annette Paul, and Andre Tempel who all live in the building, the rain gutter house is truly a work of kinetic art bringing together rainfall and a complex system of rain gutters that weave in and out of one another on the buildings facade. The result is a musical symphony of sound everytime it rains, making the house one of the largest instruments and an awesome display of what a bit of creativity can create! Watch a video of the house in action after the jump!

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Kawashi Makotori’s Baby Pictures

I know what you’re going to say. “Amir why are you posting photos of cute babies on the blog?” but come on people these photos by Kawashi Makotori are fucking unbelievable! Seriously… This baby is so cute I want to take her and squeeze her til’ she explodes. Now that’s cute!

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Ju Duoqi’s Personified Vegetable Masterpieces

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Manuel de révolte au travail

Manuel-revolution-bureau-06

The brilliant aspect about instructional illustrations is that they speak for themselves (don’t miss the story in its ordered entirety by clicking on Read More below). But if you’re further wondering what this little beauty was intended for, it comes to us thanks to Packard Jennings and the Centennial Society who describes this as a “small, sixteen-page pamphlet… produced to put inside the postage-paid, business-reply envelopes that come with junk mail offers. Every envelope collected is stuffed with the pamphlet and mailed back to its original company.” Feel like participating in some subtle revolts of your own? I would recommend checking out their participate link!

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mark Pieterson

Mark Pieterson’s illustrations, are weird, bold, and full of dayglo colors, just the way we like them.

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Nicholas Hance McElroy

Nicholas Hance McElroy

Nicholas Hance McElroy takes photographs, but photographs unlike any I could ever take. A) Because I’ll probably never go to such dramatic landscapes as these, and B) They’re so beautiful and hazy… as if part of a far-off dream.

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Joshua Petker’s “Adrift” at LeBasse Projects

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Joshua Petker has taken a leap of faith so brave that most artists would rather cower at their easels for an infinitum than ever attempt. Yet, he has not only landed successfully, but also staked his claim on an entirely new ground of possibilities, which proves that one can always reinvent themselves whilst still staying true to their initial spirit. After roughly 4 years of painting the exquisite portraits of women he has come to be known for, he has almost entirely exchanged it all for a deeper, richer, and much more personally satisfying subject matter. So, when you walk through the gallery doors at LeBasse Projects in Culver City, you’re not greeted by a woman, but rather a shipwreck. A metaphor that ignites your imagination into so many realms that it’s impossible to choose simply one, since your eye will follow the ship as it circles round a blackened sphere with a rim of color — entrancing you into a deep meditation. However, the most awesome and powerful piece to me was that of a monster storming out from behind an apple tree. It’s face, drafted in an impressionistic rendering of fat colored lines bursting from a beige canvass. Joshua Petker has done what many would consider to be the impossible, so bravo Joshua, bravo!

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