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Ahn Jun’s Photography at Dizzying Heights

The photographic images of artist Ahn Jun unfold at dizzying heights.  Ahn captures her self-portraits perched atop ledges and windowsills.  The frightening heights don’t act as a gimmick it does in the current Russian fad that may come to mind.  Rather, Ahn uses the elevation more as a narrative tool.  While clearly referencing suicide, she pushes the story beyond that also.  She nearly seems not only to be involved in an inner drama but interacting with the cityscape as a whole – she looks as if to be addressing the city personally.

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eBoy Interview

Digital Design Collective eBoy Discusses their Limited Edition BD Apparel Shirt “Jerk”

The digital design collective eBoy, comprised of Steffen Sauerteig, Svend Smital and Kai Vermehr recently sat down with Beautiful/Decay to answer a few questions about their recent limited edition shirt, “Jerk.” eBoy’s design was one of our most technical cut and sews ever, taking months to produce! Only 250 of these exclusive shirts were produced and are selling out fast- visit our Online Shop to purchase one!

Read on to garner some of eBoy’s pixellated points of interest and inspiration behind their work and Beautiful/Decay Apparel design.

BD: Can you talk a little bit about your design collective and how it got started?

eBoy: We started in 1998 with eboy.com. The concept was to only show our free projects and art. The first feature about eBoy was in a Japanese book, from there the level of awareness for eBoy grew steadily.

eBoy design

eBoy design

BD: Can you describe your aesthetic, how you became interested in the pixel-by-pixel look, and what you think it says about the current visual digital climate today?

eBoy: One of our previous projects was a digital picture book series called Ogdig(c)’s, which was distributed on diskettes. It was that project that made us start to work for the screen only and use pixels as the technique of choice. When we went online with eBoy.com it was justnatural to go on using this technique.

eBoy work for Coke

eBoy work for Coke

BD: What are some of your inspirations, whether visual, musical, ideological…?

eBoy: ffffound.com … TV Shows like The Wire, Sopranos …

BD: What was the inspiration behind creating the Eboy shirt?

eBoy: Northern Irish murals!

Example of Northern Irish propaganda Mural

BD: What was the process like of creating your artwork in a t-shirt form, what were the most enjoyable parts, or most challenging?

eBoy: We were thinking of the T-shirt as a house with awkward window positions.

To learn more about eBoy, visit their B/D Artist Profile or the eBoy website.

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Place

Place

Place, placed in Argentina, plays with parts of people and pieces of precipitation. Oh, and is really good at creating surreal and beautiful images. Their most current project is for MTV, making MTV just a little bit cooler (what with no music videos aired anymore, they sure need it). 

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ALFRED STEINER

Drawings by Alfred Steiner.

“Alfred Steiner, part intellectual draftsman, part pop culture surgeon. His works on hot press paper consisted of characters and scenes from the popular to the ambitious—Shaggy and Fred from Scooby Doo!, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Saint Anthony—all composed of jutting, blood-tipped bones and glistening, sinewy muscle. Profiles were assembled not with soft lines but with femurs, horses galloped not with hooves but on bare bone and demons brandished swords of muscle over prostrate outlines of pus and blood. Steiner creates a disorienting, dreamy and disturbingly beautiful feast for the eyes, calling to mind large masterworks of surgeons operating in an amphitheater, though one believes it is Steiner whose work operates on us, rather than vice versa. By creating instantly recognizable outlines from the most vital and basic parts of human anatomy, Steiner forces us to look at the culture around us while acknowledging the literal cultures within us.”Sarah Hassan

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Luzinterruptus’ Melbourne Installation Of Thousands of Books and LEDs

“Literature vs. Traffic”:

 

To the other side of the world we went, going from the sunny summer in Madrid to a mild and rainy winter, with the romantic intention of converting the modern and somewhat cold architecture of Federation Square, into a cozy, human and intimate space, which encouraged reading and tranquility.

 

So the folks at Milan-based collective Luzinterruptus (previously) went down to Melbourne and did their thing with lights (if you don’t know by now, they’ve put on some really ill installations using all sorts of LED lights), except this time they used thousands of books to “block traffic” in “a symbolic gesture in which literature took control of the streets and became the conquerer of the public space”. The pages seem to flow into one another as a cohesive whole and the LEDs add some sort of mystical dimension to the whole thing. I love the shots of people just swimming in the installation, which was up for a whole month. The positive message promoting literacy is just frosting on the cake. Click the jump to see more of what went down. (via)

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Scott Espeseth

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Scott Espeseth’s works draw from cartoons, children’s books, and the doodles we used to sketch into the margins of notebooks when we were supposed to be taking notes. (Who says memorizing the state capitals is more important that creative expression, anyways?)  Espeseth says he draws in order to get lost in a different space and time, often to reminisce. He favors a wide range of media that are “commonplace, overlooked, and sometimes obsolete,” from silverpoint to the humble ballpoint pen.

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Ryan Travis Christian’s Well, Here We Aren’t Again

Chicago based Ryan Travis Christian has just opened his first Museum Exhibition at CAM Raleigh entitled Well, Here We Aren’t Again. Ryan spent three weeks on site creating a large-scale wall drawing, sculptures and floor installation specifically for CAM Raleigh’s Independent Weekly Gallery. This new body of work continues his hazy vision of dank landscapes ripe with powerful patterns, cartoon personalities, and awkward situations expertly rendered with graphite and ink.

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Private Photo Booth Moments

NielPhotography4

NielPhotography2

NielPhotography3

Charlotte Niel’s series Behind the Curtain captures the moments before, during, and after patrons’ engagements with carnival and fair photo booths. These photographs are light and fun, bright and summery. Photo booths have consistently been a place of discovery and wonder, a place to experience the excitement of pulling a curtain behind you to allow some privacy in the midst of a very public setting. In a culture where so much of our photography experience is digital, and the tangibility of the photograph does not seem to be as privileged or common as it once it was, the photo booth is a place that offers this immediate experience. I particularly enjoy the variety of color in these photographs and Niel’s captures of the bottom halves of the photo booth’s subjects. There’s a sense of mystery and curiosity that these images evoke, and I think that largely has something to do with the merging of these private moments in a public setting captured with a public eye.

Of her series, Niel explains, “How many times have we looked at an old photograph and wondered about the person in the frame? People or family members we never knew, set in places we never visited or that have changed beyond recognition. Photos are often the only means to link us to our past or the past of others. They help us not to forget. They become visual memories. For these reasons, I find it fascinating to watch what happens at photo booths at county fairs. People come with family and friends to celebrate anniversaries, birthdays, friendships or just to make an annual visit to the booths. For others, it is just a way to capture who they are or with whom they are at that moment, on their own private stage. The result is a body of work of people who shared with me moments that took place in front of and behind the curtain, documented for unknown viewers. With my camera, it became a transformation of a private moment into a public one.”

Charlotte Niel lives and works in San Francisco.

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