Get Social:

Jason de Caires

Picture 2

Amir, you underwater explorer  you, this goes to you. Jason de Caires creates haunting underwater sculptures reminiscent of Atlantean ruins, or the macabre corpse-casts of Pompeii. People turned to stone, left to transform into coral reefs and feeding grounds for schools of fish….there is a strange and beautiful magic in these pieces. Imagine discovering these still and silent souls while swimming?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Artist Update: Dave Tada captures ‘Art Works Every Time’

4698672791_cb79d9922f_b

A few weeks ago we featured LA photographer Dave Tada and his collection of analog images. Well, last Saturday night, Dave showed up with his Fuji Intax camera at Beautiful/Decay’s Art Works Every Time opening to capture the happenings! Between the live music, the art-adorned walls, the free ice cream, free t-shirts and plenty of free Colt 45, there was plenty of silliness to be had –  particularly towards the end of the evening. Thanks for the pics Dave.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Conrad Ruiz

I like Conrad Ruiz’s painting a lot but I like his ambition even more. Video by Clement & Co.

Currently Trending

Black Moth Super Rainbow

Not only does Black Moth Super Rainbow make amazing music, they also brought their music videos to a whole new level with interactivity for this Dark Bubbles piece. Like, what? Just move your mouse around from right to left (the webcam activated one doesn’t seem to be working…). The concept is really simple-just a guy jumping up and down on a trampoline, but smart at the same time. I kind of wish there was more variation though.

Currently Trending

Hana Knížová Photographs The Ambitious And Aspirational Youth Of Hollywood

Hana Knizova

Hana Knizova

Hana Knizova

Hana Knizova

London based photographer Hana Knížová‘s new series Young Hollywood focuses on the dreams, goals, hopes and aspirations of the optimistic youth of L.A looking to make a break in the industry. Noted for it’s cut throat competitiveness, Hollywood is no child’s playground. These portraits capture a time of these people’s lives when they are aware of the challenges ahead, but not intimated enough to stop trying. Knížová says of her inspiration:

I am interested in the topic of youth and its ambitions, as it’s something which develops and changes as we grow older. Our motivation and priorities change. Some personal goals might not be achieved for several different reasons – it can be quite disappointing and bitter, but other goals might gradually and naturally start lacking relevance in one’s life. Only time will show.

Stylistically the photographs are shot in various locations, either in personal cars, or homes, local diners, street corners or burger joints – all seeming very personal. It is a rare look at a performer’s inner emotions. It is easy to see boundless optimism and hope, but somewhere niggling doubts are also lingering. Knížová goes on:

I also asked my sitters to fill a short questionnaire about their current situation, about their aspirations, and what “fame” and “success” mean to them. This serves for my personal record, although it was certainly challenging for them verbalise the thoughts. Sometimes we catch ourselves in auto pilot or chasing a dream without forming some sort of context, this exercise is both reaffirming and acknowledging of these big picture goals they set for themselves.

It will indeed be an interesting social experiment to see just where these young Hollywood star and starlets end up down the track. To see more of Knížová’s beautiful work visit her tumblr site. (Via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Young Candy Maker Shinri Tezuka Creates Realistic Lollipops That Are Almost Too Pretty To Eat

shinri-tezuka-4[6]amezaiku-hyper-realistic-animal-lollipops-shinri-tezuka-japan-5
amezaiku-hyper-realistic-animal-lollipops-shinri-tezuka-japan-3-515x565sucettes-animaux-Shinri-Tezuka-3
Young Japanese artist/candy maker Shinri Tezuka keeps a centuries old tradition alive known as amezaiku. This is the art of making lollipops from sugar, water, starch and food coloring. What makes Tezuka unique is how he takes this technique to the next level by creating beautiful creatures which are almost too good to eat.
His latest creations are of the aquatic variety and engage in an almost scientific-like aesthetic. His work becomes a study in temporary beauty and in this case water creatures such as lion head goldfish, frogs and tadpoles are elegantly rendered. Their ultra realistic nature hints at the eerie and tends to look similar to watercolor paintings or glass sculptures one might find in a curio shop.  Much more than a candy made to be consumed Tezuka takes it to the next level with craft and allows the sweet sticks to cross over into fine art. The realistic quality make them almost impossible to eat because of their beautiful aesthetic.
The first candies resembling Lollipops date back to the middle ages when nobility would eat boiled sugar on sticks. The modern day lollipop is credited to a man named George Smith who trademarked the name in 1931 after a racehorse named Lolly pop. He originaly sold soft rather than hard candy on a stick. When broken down the word lolly pop means tongue slap. (via spoontamago)

Currently Trending

Cedric Laquieze’s Flower Skeletons

 

 

Cedric Laquieze creates incredible creatures out of the odd combination of animal skulls and flowers. The result is gorgeously grotesque and incredibly haunting.

Currently Trending

TONK

Collaborative unit created by two photographers in Germany. 

Moment of truth (eminem), part 2

Moment of truth (eminem), part 2

Currently Trending