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Devin Yalkin’s Photographs Of Illegal Fight Nights In NYC Get You Up Close And Personal Into The Ring

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Photographer Devin Yalkin points an unflinching eye to the underground world of illegal fight nights, capturing their raw intensity. These “Friday Night Throwdowns” happen in secret locations and venues all over New York City. In Yalkin’s series The Old One Two, this hidden world is revealed through intimate, black and white photographs with a Film Noir flavor to them. This powerful series gets you up close and personal to the fighters and the erupting crowd cheering them on. The compositions in this series can be as hazy and chaotic as the fight itself, capturing the true atmosphere of these fight nights. You can see the unrefined aggressiveness and brutality between the fighters, but also feel the excitement and energy from the audience.

Devin Yalkin allows us to take place of the spectator, seeing every bead of sweat and drop of blood on the skin of the fighters. The high tension and motion happening during these Friday Night Throwdown’s can be felt in each photograph. It is as if we are standing next to each eccentric character; the screaming fan, the eager fighter, or the elusive woman in lingerie whose role is somewhat unknown. All of the individuals shown in Yalkin’s series seem to come from all walks of life, having only the love of the fight connecting them.

Make sure to check out Devin Yalin’s new strange and beautiful series Abductions, which captures ominous scenes of which we cannot place, mysterious and alluring.
(via Featureshoot)

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JUSTIN ANGELOS

Justin Angelos’ collage works mix vintage paper with bold colored magazine cutouts to surreal images dealing with Life, death, loss and rebirth.

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Dance Of The Disfigured: Monica Piloni’s Resin Sculptures Are Disturbingly Elegant

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Sculptor Monica Piloni creates surreal, multifaceted versions of the human body from resin, hair and different plastics. Whether it is a triptych of herself, melded at the hips, with multiple breasts, three legs and conjoined heads, or a double tailed horse, she has the ability to make something gruesome seem commonplace. In her work Ballet Series, she assembles body parts to look quietly surreal and unassuming, yet elegant. Figures lie on beds, as if exhausted from a recital, literally collapsing on themselves. Piloni places her models in a graceful manner, toes pointed and muscles tensed as they would be mid-dance. The poses and gestures of the bodies conjure up the drama of French Romantic oil paintings, where humans were depicted expressing a whole range of emotions with their bodies.

In her work Concave & Convex, she piles dismembered body parts up on themselves to form a human landscape. Similar to Louise Bourgeois’s ambiguous sculptural forms, Piloni fragments the human shape into abstraction, and in the process dismantles her, and our, understanding of identity.

Her sculptures are captivating because of their simplicity and fluency of movement. Even her more challenging pieces (modified women with exposed genitalia) have a gentle symmetry that reassures, rather than revolts. See more of her beautifully gruesome work after the jump. (Via Sweet Station)

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Alexey Malina

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If our sins had a shape it would probably look quite similar to how Alexey Malina, a Russian designer/ digital artist, imagined them. Alexey created a series of abstractions based on the seven deadly sins. He explores each vice through geometrical shapes but without losing the probable syrupy movement they have. I especially enjoyed his interpretation of “wrath.”

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Summertime Soundtrack: Brooklyn-based Savoir Adore’s, Our Nature

Savoir Adore

Savoir Adore's Paul Hammer and Deidre Muro performing at the Echo in Los Angeles on August 7, 2013.

Savoir Adore’s Paul Hammer and Deidre Muro performing at the Echo in Los Angeles on August 7, 2013.

I was able to catch one of my favorite Brooklyn-based bands, Savoir Adore playing their first ever headlining show at the Echo in LA last week. Dressed in all white and sounding as blissed out as ever, the band performed both old and new songs to the intimate sing-a-long crowd. Stand out songs included, “Dreamers” and “Imagination”that are both on their recently re-released second full length album, “Our Nature” on Nettwerk Records after releasing it last year with a successful Kickstarter campaign which of course I supported.

The band recently premiered their new video, “Regalia” with our friends over at Buzzbands.LA and are about to perform their biggest hometown show to date next month at the Music Hall of Williamsburg on Sep. 21st. You can also check them out at DC9 in Washington DC on Sep. 24th, at Philadelphia’s Boot & Saddle on Sep. 25th, and at Great Scott in Boston on Sep. 29th. Check out the video for “Regalia” and make sure to catch them next month on the East Coast!

 

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THERESA HIMMER’s Sequin Landscapes

Gorgeous pixelated depictions of nature in urban settings by Theresa Himmer created out of thousands of sequins.

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Keita Sagaki’s Doodles Turn Into Classic Works of Art

What may at first look like a sketch of a classic sculpture is actually a mass of tiny doodles  by Japanese artist Keita Sagaki. Sagaki manages to turn drawings of UFOs, skulls, and aliens that you’d see on the edges of your middle school notebook, into beautiful works of art. These tongue-in-cheek works combine the artist’s respect for classic paintings and sculpture with his love for modern comics and graffiti. Sagakis art can take months to create since each work is composed of millions of smaller compositions. Each of his drawings are improvised and drawn directly onto the surfaces he uses without being drafted.

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SpY Installs 150 Security Cameras On One Building. You Won’t Believe What They Catch On Camera!

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SpY, an urban/graffiti artist, installed 150 fake security cameras on a building façade in Madrid, Spain. The piece, titled CAMERAS, has no intention of watching over anything, the cameras are simply on the wall for show, rather, to make a statement about excessive surveillance in today’s world. As his website states, “SpY’s s work involves the appropriation urban elements through transformation or replication, commentary on urban reality, and the interference in its communicative codes.”

The repetitiveness, and overwhelming saturation of the cameras, imposes critical questions about cameras of any sort in our lives. Whether that might be security cameras, to a personal camera, to the camera on your phone or computer, we are surrounded by them in our urban landscape and personal space,they questions is: what are they really filming?

Cameras signify the documentation of something important, a bad or good event, but definitely not something mundane. If we are surrounded by cameras, we are also surrounded by the expectations of something grand, something bad or good always happening. This is too much of a burden.

SpY’s pieces want to be a parenthesis in the automated inertia of the urban dweller. They are pinches of intention, hidden in a corner for whoever wants to let himself be surprised. Filled with equal parts of irony and positive humor, they appear to raise a smile, incite reflection, and to favor an enlightened conscience.

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