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Amanda Manitach’s T-Shirt Girls Have Penis Envy

Amanda Manitach- Ink and WatercolorAmanda Manitach- Ink and Watercolor

Amanda Manitach- Ink and Watercolor

Amanda Manitach- Ink and Watercolor

Amanda Manitach’s drawings of skinny girls in t-shirts plays with gender roles and feminism in a thought-provoking way. The sparse style of these ink drawings, sometimes painted over with watercolor, offers an intriguing aesthetic.

Fair haired women standing, sitting, or walking their pet unicorns with nonchalance and a hint of lethargy. Their faces wear little more than ennui, but their black t-shirts, adorned with sardonic statements, pack a punch. There is one thing they all have in common: PENIS. Ranging from wanting penis to not wanting penis, having a penis, the problems with penis, and boner jokes, she has it all covered with wry humor. Seattle-based artist Amanda Manitach is well known for these figures, which almost remind you of Henry Darger’s Vivian Girls, on a heavy dose of xanax. Some of the girls have male genitals, which in combination with the t-shirt sayings, seems to imply a sort of hermaphroditic independence, or is it just a wet dream?

Either way, these women sure don’t seem to give a damn about having a man.

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“The Dark Side of the Covers” Imagines The Other Side Of Famous Album Art

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Famous Album Art

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Flickr user Harvezt imagines what the reverse side of iconic album covers would look like in their illustrative series, The Dark Side of the Covers. Taking famous works by Nirvana, David Bowie, The Beatles and more, the artist not only fills in the other half of well-known characters,  but creates entire worlds with a sinister-esque twist.

Harvezt’s additions to these albums make them more well-rounded and conceptually rich. Our new, second viewpoint enhances the story. On Dio’s cover for Dream Evil, we see the original image has a demon making the devil horn with his hands as he peers into a sleeping child’s bedroom. Harvezt’s reverse illustration reveals the the demon being cheered on by a crowd of supporters sporting their own horns.

With all of the thoughtful details that the artist put into these works, they pay homage to these influential covers. Today’s digital downloads don’t always place an emphasis on album artwork, and makes Harvezt’s series a tribute to a time when people purchased physical copies of their music. (Via Metal Injection)

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New Atlantis

Adam Shecter at Eleven Rivington, on view from September 2 – October 4th, opening September 9, 6-8 pm.  This is the artist’s New York gallery solo debut and will feature a new two-channel digital video animation entitled New Atlantis.

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Nøne Futbol Club’s Humorous And Subversive Sculptures And Installations

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Nøne Futbol Club is a duo of Paris based artists.  They work in a wide variety of mediums and forms from video to installation.  However, nearly all of their work seems to be tied together by a certain mischievous sense of humor.  Though not always overtly political, the duo’s art is definitely subversive.  For example, consider Lift a Finger, the first piece pictured here.  The maneki-neko, usually a statuette of a welcoming or beckoning cat suddenly becomes hostile with a simple change of hand gesture.  The pharase “KEEP WARM BURNOUT THE RICH”  is turned into a branding iron.  The implement not only burns, but more importantly is a tool for displaying and designating ownership.

Nicolas Rosette goes onto describe the duo’s practice saying:

“Nøne Futbol Club is a duo that is capable of mobilizing as many accomplices as necessary to make their works and performances.
The playful component is inseparable from their creative process which tackles the world like a playground for the expression of an art whose nature has continually bordered on the cellophane of the white cube and the great palaces must take the risk of being a mass distribution product. The recursive principle in their work is reversal. It is not about diverting elements from pop culture(or popular culture, the term changing depending on whether this culture comes to us from one side or the other of the Atlantic Ocean) but of a reversal whose final address is always popular culture. A double inversion, whose process of revelation reflects back to us as in a mirror the possible destiny of an art world which has become less subtle than the current popular media cultures; whose practices of critical and jubilatory diversions are the foundation. Would the Nøne Futbol Club be applying to contemporary art what digital cultures have subjected Chuck Norris, the pope and Darth Vader to?”

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Susanna Bauer Threads And Weaves Over Small Natural Objects

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“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.” – Susanna Bauer

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Beautiful/Decay Presents…5 Reasons to Subscribe

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Do you revel in hot, anguished tears rolling down the innocent face of a child? We certainly do not. How can you solve this world-wide problem? We suggest you subscribe to Beautiful/Decay. As artist C.W. Moss has illustrated in Reason #2 of our hand-painted illustrated series, a subscription a year will erase every child’s tear.

Support crying babies….. or contemporary art. Subscribe to Beautiful/Decay today!

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Flying Lotus’ Projection Cube Transforms Animations Into An Actual 3D Experience

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At the live show for Flying Lotus‘ ‘You’re Dead’ tour, audience members were treated to a visual spectacle few were expecting. Using his artist name of Strangeloop, David Wexler joined forces with John King (Timeboy), not only to produce hypnotizing visual art, but to transform the whole experience of FlyLo’s new stage show. Calling the sculpture Layer³ (pronounced Layer Cubed), this multi-screen set up is an expansion of an earlier project called Layer 3.

Working under the label Brainfeeder, Ellison and Wexler reconnected and began combining their respective talents of creating memorizing tunes and animations. Recognizing that most moments we remember are cinematic ones, Ellison knew he wanted a strong visual component to his stage show. With none of the animations pre-programmed, Timeboy and Strangeloop are responding to FlyLo’s tunes in real time, trying to visually produce something that reinforces the audio experience. Wexler describes the logistics of making the animation cube:

It’s essentially two projectors—a rear projected screen and a front projected screen. You can get a certain amount of three-dimensionality because we have a foreground projection, Flying Lotus performing in the mid-ground, and a background projection. (Source)

For FlyLo, to play in between the screens and not be able to engage with the audience in a conventional way allows him to delve into his set more; really trying to communicate the story he wants to tell through his music. He is trying to find the place that reminds him of being a kid, and wants to transport his fans to the same magical place he loves.

I think as we get older that idea of magic is taken from us, there’s just less and less of it as we get older. I really try to dabble in things that feel magical. (Source)

(Via The Creator’s Project)

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Objects Crash Into Photographer’s Face in Humorous Series

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Photographer and grad student Kaija Straumanis has created a playful self-portrait series in which her image is captured right at the moment a random object seems to be thrown at her face. A pumpkin, book, dodgeball, boot, and even a mojito smash into Straumanis’ head, smooshing her face and glasses into an awkward contortion. Despite the impact of the objects, in each photo, Straumanus stares a seemingly unaffected gaze into the camera lens. The collisions are set during everyday tasks and among familiar environments, resulting in a humorous series of striking moments. According to HLN, Straumanis creates the photographs by layering images into a composite and artfully manipulating them until they appear seamless. She practices mashing objects into her face, looking into a mirror to create the perfect pose, then layers images accordingly. “I feel like it’s disappointing that I’m not actually getting beat up,” Straumanis admits. “I’m duping the Internet!” (via bored panda)

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