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Jackie Dives Documents Her Brother’s Recovery From Heroin Addiction

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Jackie and her brother together. On his first day in the world, and a few years later.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Sober.

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives is a Vancouver-based portrait and documentary photographer who has bravely followed her brother’s recovery from heroin addiction. The project began nearly a year ago, when her brother asked her to capture his progress. Jackie agreed, explaining she “wanted to do it as a record for him, hopefully [as] a way for him to remember the severity of his addiction, and prevent him from relapsing.” The images are unfailing in their honesty, capturing fluctuations of strength, hope, pain, and vulnerability. We see him smiling, looking healthy, and sitting beside his girlfriend (who bravely accepted that Jackie take her photograph post-breast augmentation, thus adding another dimension of fearlessness and candidness to the series). In other photos, he looks troubled, his face lined with pain and sadness. The emotion emanating from these images is palpable, and even though Jackie’s brother may be unknown to us, his portraits of struggle and hope inspire a profound sense of empathy and acceptance for individuals enduring the trials of drug addiction and recovery.

What makes this series even more significant is the fact that, for Jackie, her love-infused photographic ambitions began with her brother. Eight years his senior, Jackie began documenting him as soon as he was born; as she writes in her Artist Statement, “Because of our age gap, photography was a realistic way for us to connect that didn’t require us to have much in common, other than being in the same room.” He was not an easy subject; “he moved fast,” and was uninterested in the art she was trying to create. As a result, Jackie became adept at working on the fly, less concerned about refinement and perfection, and interested instead in snapping the purity of a moment. These experiences documenting her brother have developed the core of her artistic objectives and philosophies; while working in the fields of family, event, and travel photography, true portraiture is always her primary focus:

“What’s important to me is simply a moment in the life of my subject. It is not forced or artificial. I want to show my subject truly. […] Ultimately, it’s about letting people continue to be themselves, and not stopping the moment, but letting it flow on, and being adaptable to it. I only want to capture what is actually happening, and in doing that, take a true portrait.” (Source)

Visit Jackie’s website to see more images from this powerful series, as well as many other beautiful portraits and projects. Her Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook page are also up-to-date with her most recent and ongoing work, so be sure to check out those as well. More images of her brother’s recovery after the jump.

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Joana Vasconcelos’ Sculptures Made Out of Doilies, Tampons And Other Unusual Materials

 

Paris-born and Lisbon-based Joana Vasconcelos is the foremost Portuguese artist of her generation. Known for her aesthetic extravagance, her oversized textile sculptures of everyday items toe the line between whimsy and aggressiveness, and she is noted for her use of unusual materials. Vasconcelos’ beautiful hanging chandelier “The Bride”, for example, is ever so fittingly made from tampons.

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An Entire Amusement Park Packed Into A 13 Foot Cube

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The Glue Society‘s newest project for Sculpture by the Sea, Aarhus is an amusent park, or rather, was an amusement park.  James Dive of the group gathered an entire demolished amusement park and compacted it into one 13 foot cube.  Pieces of rides and remnants of prizes can easily be seen in the mass.  The cube was clearly once a place people looked for fun and relaxation, but is now irretrievably gone.  Dive says of the project, “The project is about the finality of a missed moment.  Creating it was undoubtedly the most violent process I’ve ever embarked upon.”

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Nicolas Kennedy Sitton’s Twisted Architecture

Nicolas Kennedy Sitton‘s Twisted series uses photographic manipulation to distort the architecture of San Francisco. The photographer adds concentric circles to the images to form new shapes, with the buildings seemingly folding and toppling into themselves.

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Surreal And Unnerving Photo Manipulations Question The Nature Of Reality

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For his surreal photo manipulations, the Buenos Aires-based digital artist Martin De Pasquale contorts his own body to imbue the mundane rituals of daily life with a sense of humor that sometimes veers into the realm of terror. With the wonderfully oxymoronic title “Impossible Photography,” De Pasquale’s work stretches the medium to its limit, boldly questioning our assumption that the photographic object necessarily reflects reality. Though indeed impossible, the strange and comical mishaps— and horrors— of the work speak to very real existential anxieties.

Here, the human body emerges as mechanical, much like the the camera itself. Like the gears of an advanced automaton, heads and faces are replaced with ease, and the treat of mortality is abated with ever-renewed body parts. In some ways, the impossible photographs recall the paradox of the Ship of Theseus, a thought experiment which asks if a ship remains essentially the same after each of its parts are replaced. Here, the ship becomes a human being; in the daily grind of life, our protagonist is continually deconstructed and reassembled. Does he become generic, or does he hold fast to his identity?

In so questioning the individual, De Pasquale’s imaginative images challenge the notion of replication, which in turn examines the very nature of the photograph. Seen here many times over, the self is given over to a mysterious—and frightening— sort of duplication, giving rise to unnatural yet indistinguishable bodies that are ultimately mere simulacrums of the original. Take a look. (via Demilked)

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Georgia Russell Uses Her Scalpel On Images Of Naked Bodies To Bring Them To Life

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A naked body lacerated by regular and organized cuts. The paper sculptures of Georgia Russell are full of expression and poetry. Using just her scalpel to create motion on two dimension pictures.

She collects magazines and newspapers. And browses flea markets to find books to cut. Originally from Scotland, she moved to France after graduating and that’s when she started tearing out books she found on the docks of the Seine in Paris. The artist found in the act of cutting that she was liberating the books from their sculptural forms. Humanizing and creating a connection between the books and the viewers.

Georgia Russell is drawing with her scalpel. The repetitive patterns she designs on the paper look like brisk brushstrokes. Blending with the background, creating texture mimicking feathers blown by an imaginary wind. She gives a voluptuous movement to the cutouts. Circles and waves are embracing the position of the naked bodies.
The artist thinks of cutting paper as a mean to express her feelings. A freedom of speech she uses to captures strong emotions into her pieces. The notion of destruction is omnipresent in her interpretation of the use of the scalpel. However, it’s a positive one. From an abandoned piece of paper and her scalpel, she transforms her turmoil into an organic and vibrant art piece. (via INAG)

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Manuel de révolte au travail

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The brilliant aspect about instructional illustrations is that they speak for themselves (don’t miss the story in its ordered entirety by clicking on Read More below). But if you’re further wondering what this little beauty was intended for, it comes to us thanks to Packard Jennings and the Centennial Society who describes this as a “small, sixteen-page pamphlet… produced to put inside the postage-paid, business-reply envelopes that come with junk mail offers. Every envelope collected is stuffed with the pamphlet and mailed back to its original company.” Feel like participating in some subtle revolts of your own? I would recommend checking out their participate link!

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Amusing Photo Series Imagines If Shoes Had Teeth

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In a surreal and slightly disturbing series titled Running Gag by the Hamburg-based studio POP. Postproduction, they imagine what it would be like if shoes teeth to accompany their tongues. POP specializes in photo-retouching, and manipulated the images has the loafers, boat shoes, and Converse sneakers laughing and grinning. Some have a gap tooth, others a gold grill, while some have hardly any teeth at all.

There is some correspondence with the teeth and the shoe. For instance, the pink canvas shoe with decorative laces has a mouth full of braces, so we’d imagine they are a teenage girl. The gold-studded loafer is an “alternative style” to the preppy shoe, so its gold lip ring feels appropriate.

Despite being slickly-produced and brightly-colored series, the Running Gag is subtle, and it’s only after more than a seconds glance that you realize there are teeth in these shoes. It’s POP’s Photoshopping skills that add to the believability of these characters, and they look liked they’d be right in place in a horror film. (Via Design Taxi)

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