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Junk Food Reimagined And Plated As High End Cuisine By “Fake Chef” Jacques La Merde

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Let’s face it no matter how much we learn about the benefits of good nutrition junk food will always remain part of our diet. Even if we’re not eating high calorie high processed food everyday there are times when you ‘just need it’. Nothing beats the crispy crunch of French Fries or a delectably cheesy quesadilla after an exhausting day at work. It makes for a nice comfy meal when you’re just too tired to make something healthy. Then there are those who would rather eat junk food over everything else. Who hasn’t heard a friend say they went to a fancy restaurant and afterwards thought the local diner was better? My mom used to say she liked hamburgers better than steak and I’m sure she still does.

Poking fun at this idea is a project by “fake chef” Jacques La Merde. Under this fictional name, La Merde creates junk food dishes reimagined and plated as high end nouveau cuisine. Through his intepretations we see a Coney Island corn dog broken down into fancy morsels metaphorically selling for $30 a plate. The food is almost unrecognizable from its original state and one has to look very closely to see which junk food staple the artist is recreating. Some of the barely familiar items on view are hostess cupcakes, cheese and crackers, hard boiled eggs, creamsicles, hot pockets, tv dinners, dunkin munchkins and the list goes on.

La Merde displays new creations on an instagram account which currently has 60k followers. Just another testament to the public’s love of all things bad for you disguised as something else. (via escapekit)

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B/D Best of 2010- Giovanni Bortolani Is In Stitches

Giovanni Bortolani has this really twisted series of people gutted out and stitched back together. To mix it up a bit, there are some portraits of culinary students.

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Xavier Antin’s home printing

"Just in Time, or A Short History of Production"

Xavier Antin is a recent grad of Royal College of Art currently based in London. His piece “Just in Time, or A Short History of Production” is a clever recycling of old technologies to make something new. A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history. The final piece is a product created from a very strange offset printing process and doesn’t quite look how you would expect it to! Check out more pictures of “Just in Time” and other works by Xavier after the jump.

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Sage Vaughn

Sage Vaughn
Wildlife and Wildlives make up the world of artist Sage Vaughn. Swarming brightly colored butterflies along with strangely dressed kids makes for some interesting subject matter, and there is definitely a feeling of tension between the natural and unnatural elements in these paintings. Born in Jackson, Oregon and now working in Los Angeles, Sage also helped illustrate a killer music video for N.A.S.A. that you can see here.

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Peter Schuyff

Peter Schuyff’s favorite terms to describe himself are “irreverent,” “obsessive, ” and “spiritual. ” By irreverence, he means his confidence in what he is doing, his casual acceptance of an abstract vocabulary. The obsessiveness is in his technique. And through this process, his work becomes imbued with a kind of spirituality an apparition seems to build up within the layers of paint, and the light emanating from the canvas is, perhaps, a hint of its presence…he began painting one patterned surface over another, and then began to add semi translucent white grids to the two layers, further confusing the relationship between the patterns. Slightly claustrophobic, these paintings have been described as padded cells, albeit ones through which light mysteriously penetrates.

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The Handmade Psychedelic Marbles Of Mike Gong Are Out Of This World

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Mike Gong

These beautiful marbles from Portland based glass artist Mike Gong shows us he hasn’t lost his marbles at all – he has definitely still got them and, in fact, wants us to buy them. The talented man hand crafts colorful, intricate marbles filled with psychedelic swirls, bubbles, swooshes, and flecks. Ranging from about 13mm to 50mm, his marbles, which he calls ‘Acid Eaters’ are incredibly detailed and contain amazing miniature worlds within.

Gong’s marbles are full of abstract colors and forms, and he really exploits the materiality of the glass. Only with this particular material – and Gong’s patience and skill – can he achieve the depth, transparency and luminescence we see. You can purchase them here to look at them up close and in depth yourself. (Via Juxtapoz)

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Ice Fishing Shanties Transformed Into Alternative Art Spaces In Minnesota

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When the cold and snow are as harsh as this winter, the idea of an outdoor art fair sounds less than ideal to most. But, when cabin fever kicks in, anyone stuck indoors for too long understands the need to take drastic action to make the Hibernation Months bearable. Taking inspiration from the omnipresent winter ice fishing communities that spontaneously gather upon frozen lakes and ponds across the Midwest, the Art Shanties Project groups together to various themed ice shanties into a small winter attraction to give warm-blooded (and hot chocolate drinking) Minnesotans something to get through the cold months.

Proposals for these art-minded ice house are selected by committee, and run by volunteers for a few weeks in the dead of winter, creating an outdoor happening which explores the potential of new ideas in community-driven art. As the Shanties’ mission statement explains, “Art Shanty Projects is an artist driven temporary community exploring the ways in which relatively unregulated public spaces can be used as new and challenging artistic environments to expand notions of what art can be.”

Taking place in Minnesota since 2006, and operating every other year to protect the water quality and natural wildlife after the ice’s thaw, this year’s was the first on the ice of the Twin Cities suburb of White Bear Lake (hence the 25 foot, Bear-shaped bicycle-powered Pedal Bear). Each shanties’ theme range from winter-related like Ice Ice Maybe (which encases boutique items in ice) and the history museum/training course Curling Clubhouse Ice Shanty, to more participatory (such as the boogie-down Dance Shanty and the kite-making Wind Shanty) to the more conceptual (the Lost Found and Wanting Shanty, which collects actual lost belongings as well as existential yearnings).  Citing artist-audience involvement to the spontaneous community which gathers on the ice as its main goal, the Art Shanties Project “…provides a unique opportunity for artists to interact with their audience, and vice versa, in an un-intimidating, non-gallery like environment.” (via l’étoile)

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James Viscardi’s Fashion Forward Stretcher Bars Wear Clothing

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James Viscardi’s current painting series at The Sunday Painter gallery has art engage with fashion in a way rarely seen. Art and fashion overlap on so many levels, whether it is a designer creating preliminary drawings for a dress or an artist incorporating the style of an era into their portraiture to record that point in time. Fashion is a form of visual expression as painting, drawing, sculpture, etc. Even the commodification of fashion can barely differentiate it from art, as portions of the art community become increasingly concerned with haute brand name artists like Jeff Koons or Damien Hirst that can easily be compared as the Karl Lagerfelds and Marc Jacobs’ of the art world.

It can’t be denied that art and fashion go hand in hand, though often it is fashion photography that will take on themes relating to art rather than artists referencing fashion. Viscardi’s artwork recognizes the expressive potential of a piece of clothing, as well as its affinities with painting materials. After all, canvas is cotton, as is your shirt. In an interesting reversal, Viscardi literally stretches the fashion element over an art structure, to repurpose fashion for art. Fashion is much more present in the general public consciousness than art is. Every person has some opinion on fashion, not every person has engaged with art. Viscardi uses both art and fashion elements to inform each other, and the result is a seamless union (pardon the pun). (Via i-D)

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