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Jason Houge’s Intimate Look At The Lives Of Feral Cats

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With the help of their local Cats Anonymous organization, photographer Jason Houge and his girlfriend have been feeding and caring for a colony of 30 (for now) feral cats that occupy the couple’s rural Wisconsin property. When they first moved into to their home, cats would come and go, but in 2012, one family of cats stuck around longer than a season. Thus began the start of Houge’s cat family, a family that he has recently been documenting via Instagram“There’s not a lot of understanding of cats, even when they live in your home,” Houge says. “I was mostly interested in seeing how they lived and interacted within a colony.” Houge’s photographs capture the wildness of the feral cats, the use of black and white emphasizing outdoor light and shadows from which the cats emerge. There’s an intimacy to these photographs that could only be captured with the cats’ trust of the photographer.

Noting how quickly a cat population can increase, Houge explains, “It’s likely most people have heard stories of hoarders who live with hundreds of cats. It only takes two intact cats and two or three years to get to that point. A female can have an average of five kittens three times a year and can become pregnant at about six months of age.” (via feature shoot and lens)

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Roger Herman

German born artist Roger Herman creates really beautiful paintings and sculptures.  Check out some of his work after the jump!

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Prisoner Creates Epic Mural Out Of Bedsheets, Hair Gel, And Newspapers As a Meditation On Heaven, Hell, And Redemption

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Artist Jesse Krimes stands in front of his 39-panel mural Apokaluptein:16389067 (federal prison bed sheets, transferred New York Times images, color pencil) installed, here, at the Olivet Church Artist Studios, Philadelphia. January, 2014.

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In 2009, Jesse Krimes (yes that is his real name) was sentenced to 70 months in a federal penitentiary for cocaine possession and intent to distribute. The judge sentenced Jesse to a minimum security prison in New Jersey, close to support network of friends and family, but the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) opted to send him to a medium security facility in Butner, North Carolina.

His way of coping with the life-changing sentence went a bit more differently than you would expect. He got by with a little help from federal prison bed sheets, hair gel, The New York Times, and some color pencils. Although money was limited in prison, he never struggled to gather enough money to purchase these objects. You might be thinking these are random, but, in fact, they are what made prison life a somewhat more passable experience.

While experimenting with these four materials, Krimes discovered that he could transfer the newspaper images onto the prison bedsheets. At first he used water to do this, but that did not work. Hair gel, on the other hand, had the requisite viscosity to do the job. He was not aware that three years after, he would end up with a 39-panel mural. Each transfer took 30-minutes. Thousands make up the mural. Krimes only worked on one bed-sheet at a time, each of them matching the size of the tabletop he worked on. The laborious routine kept Krimes sane, focused and disciplined.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: We Are Very Busy People

Ever wonder how to make a playful and fun music video using only a laptop and some creativity? Mathieu Wothke shows us how with this video for The Limousines.

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The Once and Future Queens

Amir just brought back a beautiful brochure of Simone Lueck’s latest exhibition at Kopeikin Gallery, “The Once and Future Queens.” They’re stunning portraits of incredibly fabulous older ladies posing as some of their favorite Hollywood starlettes, as Mara, in her glamour bath after Brigitte Bardot above, demonstrates. (All subjects were found via an online ad soliciting older ladies to pose as movie stars.) The photos are dripping with fierce divas in chiffon, moss crepe, diamonds, pink satins, and honey, everything else I love! If you’re in LA, the exhibition is up just a few more days, until October 23.

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Erica Svec Finds Beauty In Human Debris

Erica Svec’s paintings draw inspiration directly from her environment. Influenced by the detritus found in her Brooklyn neighborhood, Svec finds hidden beauty in the sidewalk trash, litter, graffiti, and spilled paint and tar that she encounters in her everyday life. Intrigued by the residual human energy retained by discarded items, Svec collects things cast off by others and reassembles them into small still lifes which she uses as the basis for larger painted compositions. The humanness of these objects is articulated both literally and metaphorically in her paintings as figurative shapes are expressed or implied by elaborate collections of items.

While Svec’s vivid, evocative paintings betray diverse influences such as the late work of Georges Braque and Audrey Flack, the result is a visual language that is uniquely hers. Drawing on abandoned objects and indexical marks of human occupation, the resulting works depict vibrant and invitingly dream-like alien environments.

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Complete Your B/D Collection Sale!

Calling all you completists! Forget about your vintage coin collection and enjoy The Beautiful/Decay Back Issue Sale! Once upon a time only Czars and Royalty could complete their B/D collection, but now you, too, can complete your collection on the cheap. We’re talking over 55% off all back issues for one week! Take advantage and complete your collection of the most comprehensive art and design magazine today!

Sale Ends: May 3rd 2011

 

 

 

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Martin Roth Creates Captivating Installation With Debris And Displaced Animals From War-Torn Syria

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Martin Roth’s installation (untitled), debris, re-creates a site of war-torn Syria. Through scattered debris and rescued animals, he allows the viewer to experience a sense of destruction on a more personal note. He aims to materialize a war that, despite its large spanning presence in the news, is still quite intangible for those in the Western world. The physicality of the installation, absent of the gory images often presented in the media, explore a means to understanding the conflict on a more tangible, yet subtle manner.

When entering the gallery, the viewer is confronted by a visually familiar, but perhaps physically unknown territory. The space has been covered in dirt and rubble directly taken from the border areas of Syria and Turkey. The experience of discomfort is furthered by a reverberating ambient noise; the sound of a siren blaring in the distance. The downstairs room has been flooded in three inches of water, smelling of mold.

However, there is more to this work than just a presentation of the wreckage. Roth has also allowed his installation to become a platform for the living. Within the main installation site, the viewer is greeted with the flight and chirps of small green parakeets that have been rescued from abandoned pet shelters. The downstairs is inhabited by toads that were to be sold in Chinatown to be consumed.

The presence of animals take us out of the realm of the polarized, politicalized war, and bring us into a softer, yet more complicated truth. Here, we see a quieter realm, without images of death. The removal of human reality, somehow, speaks even more frankly about the true human condition; without the complications of ideology, scenes as these would not exist. What do sites of war really mean, free from philosophy, ethics and misunderstanding? (via: The Creators Project)

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