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Cardon Copy

cardon copyCardon Copy is an awesome project where lame posters and flyers from around the city are pulled down from bulletin boards and telephones poles to only be redesigned and placed back to there original locations. These wild and fun designs are meant to “overpower their message with a new visual language.” Make sure to check them out!

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Spilled Wine Stains Made Into Ghostly Artworks With Exquisite Embroidery

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The artist Amelia Harnas creates dazzling portraits from spilled wine, using embroidery thread to trace and refine her crimson-faced subjects. Like delicate watercolor, the wine has an ethereal texture; the artist admits a certain unpredictability and instability in her unique process. Using wax resist on soft white cotton fabrics to set the images, she cannot determine how long the delicate images will last, and the transient images float like ghosts across the page while thread guides the eye.

Art historically, wine is associated with the god Bacchus, the god of drink and sexuality who inspired mortals to drink to the point of confusion, a state where the lines of identity and gender are blurred. Here, the spilled wine soaks the fabric in such a way that only the slightest mark provides a hint into the distinctive temperament of the subject. It is the thread that defines personhood, outlining the divisions between eye and flesh, hair and scalp. Without the meticulous embroidery, men and women become murky, drunken figures.

The miraculous tension between accident and purpose heightens the drama of each face. The cotton foundation is seemingly drenched in reds and pinks, the colors chaotically spreading throughout the image and creating serendipitous halos around the portraits; in stark contrast, the embroidery is distinctly rational and deliberate, forming complex geometric shapes like concentric circles, squares and triangles.

As the volatility of wine stains collides with the reason and order of human craft, Harnas presents a startlingly complex vision of the human condition. As illustrated in this work, art, like man, is governed by both passion and sound intellect, doled out in equal measure. Take a look. (via Colossal and Oddity Central)

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Ben Quilty’s Rorschach Portraits

I’m loving these juicy rorschach oil paint portraits by Australian painter Ben Quilty. He also has a variety of other paintings on his site including some of the most lush paintings i’ve seen in a while of car wrecks.

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Lisa NIlsson’s Internal Body Landscapes Made out of Paper

Lisa Nilsson’s works renders the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross sections. Her materials are Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time.

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Shauna Richardson’s Life-Size Animal Sculptures Created Using Crochet

Shauna Richardson lives and works in the UK. She has coined the term Crochetdermy to describe her process of hand crocheting large animal sculptures. A 19th century art form is employed and specimens are created from scratch rather than being stuffed and mounted. The work puts a handcrafted spin on the art of taxidermy and comments on our relationship with the natural world. Recently she participated in the Lionheart Project in which: “…three giant lions, crocheted by hand by the artist…travelled the UK  in a custom-built, mobile, glass case. These powerful sculptures reflect the region in both symbol and materials.”

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Joe Porter

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UK graphic designer Joe Porter has a refreshing style. A combination of minimal color and collage inspired design makes his work eye catching. This young new designer is a recent graduate from Brighton University. He has already been featured in several publications i.e. Computer Arts and Wallpaper Magazine. Not too bad for this up incoming designer.

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Daisuke Takakura Stages Seas Of Clones In His Maze-Like Photographs

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Japanese photographer Daisuke Takakura creates a carousal of interactive humans. Double your pleasure.  Double your fun. His pieces challenge you to focus and rest your amygdala—puzzling you with more questions than answers; energizing your eyeballs to pounce in all directions. His reproduction of clones create a maze-like quest in his photography.

The duplicated self is positioned in a variety of stances; each with their own agenda. Whether a day in the office, playtime in the city, resting on dinosaurs or in a female basketball court frenzy—the multiplication of bodies in these settings create an unbalanced curiosity in trying to interpret what each person is doing. Repeating the “self” into many selves provides more than one imagination to be analyzed or identified with.

In one of his monodramatic photos, women are seen running from a building covered in scarlet red, which appears to be blood down the front of their dresses.  In the background, other women rest at the building entrance parading sea foam green umbrellas over their heads.

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The Chaotic Darkness Of Tomohide Ikeya’s Waterlogged Photography

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Tomohide Ikeya is a Japanese photographer whose underwater nude portraits walk the line between serene beauty and the terror of death and drowning. In three series, titled Wave, Breath, and Moon, Ikeya explores the body interacting with the ocean in various ways: struggling on the shore, reaching for the surface, and surrendering to its darkness. The images are disturbing in a poetic way, depicting people expressing the primordial will to survive, while others curl up and quietly succumb, turning the surrounding water into a simultaneous womb and deathbed. Breath — that vital act — often goes unnoticed, but Ikeya’s work makes it visible in the form of bubbles, open mouths, and deathly stillness. “Perhaps the essence of life, granted to everyone, is to live while struggling against death,” Ikeya writes in his description of Breath. “Life is not just about visible beauty, but also about true strength, which we have from birth” (Source).

For Ikeya, the neutrality of water makes it the ideal medium in which to explore the rhythms of survival. Water gives life, and also extinguishes it. “Water is not the Mother of Creation or the Master of Destruction,” Ikeya states; it simply exists as an essential but unfeeling element (Source). By photographing the body in a physical struggle against water, Ikeya’s works are dark portraits of the value of life and the concurrence of death. The boundaries between unforgiving “nature” and the indestructible “human” are literally subsumed, washed away into emotional and physical gestures of life-defining resistance against — and fatal integration with — the ocean. The moment of struggle becomes the affirmation.

Visit Ikeya’s website and Facebook to see more of his work. (Via Juxtapoz)

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