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Ines Kozic Weaves Modern Fairy Tales In Her Macabre Photographs

Ines Kozic - Photography

Ines Kozic - Photography

Macabre Photography

Macabre Photography

Photographer Ines Kozic captures modern fairy tales decorated with bone and hair. The mood is contemplative, with a subtler flavor of body horror as her fair-haired women spin their hair into thick braids and pose with ruby-red lips and a court of insects. There’s also a sense of playfulness: a woman painting with her hair in an Escheresque exercise of physics; a man’s beard woven into a basket.

According to her artist’s statement, Kozic’s work is “a reflection on the body’s ornamentation, post-mortem photography and fairy tales’s world.” Her inspiration from photography of the recently deceased in repose is especially clear in the photos where her subjects wear garlands of delicate bone.

The ever-present sense of solitude in her photography make it seem as though everyone is frozen in time. The result is an unsettling mix of beauty and the kind of disquieting daydreams that one might find in a languishing surburbia. Her subjects perform everyday chores — sewing, weaving — but with surreal objects, bedecking themselves with beetles instead of jewels.

If, as Kozic says, she’s searching for “macabre poetry,” then she’s certainly found it. (via Yatzer)

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Mind Blowing Real-Time CGI Transforms A Models Face Into A Futuristic Canvas

Nobumichi-Asai-Video-2

Nobumichi-Asai-Video-1  Nobumichi-Asai-Video-3

In his latest project OMOTE, Japanese producer Nobumichi Asai combines explicit real-time face tracking and projection mapping to create unbelievable transformations of a human face. While projecting computer generated imagery (CGI) onto buildings, room walls or cars isn’t new, using a live model as a dynamic canvas demonstrates an advances use of technology.

To accomplish such realistic and mesmerizing effect, Asai gathered a team of digital designers, CGI experts, and make-up artists. Together they created a set of digital “masks”, or, as Slash Gear referred to it, “electronic equivalent of makeup”. As shown in the video, model’s face should be scanned and mapped so the graphics can be projected and manipulated in real-time, even when the face moves around.

Despite that lots of technical details about OMOTE are left unsaid, Internet users have already started speculating on the possible use of such technology. Most suggestions include testing of products such as make-up, clothing, or even tattoos. Some state that advanced versions could be employed for medical purposes, like projecting X-Rays or creating “instant previews” of plastic surgery. Not to mention the game industry. (via Gizmodo)

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Walter Oltmann Weaves Wire Into Haunting Images Of Skulls And Babies

Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration Walter Oltmann - Sculpture, Illustration

Walter Oltmann is an artist from South Africa who weaves together aluminum wire “doily” segments to create gauzy, black-and-white images. His more recent works—which were featured recently in an exhibition titled Cradle at the Goodman Gallery in Cape Town—depict skulls and sleeping children. Through tonal layering, Oltmann creates a ghostly, semi-transparent depth, and each of the drawings are their own sculptural objects. The result is a series of eerie, ancient-looking images that invoke a theme (and contemporary relevance) of ideas surrounding death, the fragility of life, and the passage of time.

Oltmann is fascinated by the processes of geology, evolution, and human history. As the press release for Cradle informs us, his work draws on the ideas set forth by Simon Calley in Sculpture and Archaeology (2011), which describes archeology as a discipline of “examining our relationship to time and our place to its continuity [. . .] It is an activity concerned with the present [and] with projecting ourselves into the past” (Source). Historically and culturally, skulls have been enduring symbols of death and transience; the image of a sleeping child, which has been used as a grave marker, is representative of tranquility, rest, and the final “long sleep.” By finding and exploring the similarities in these motifs, Oltmann unearths an age-old melancholia and retrospective on the finitude of human life.

You can learn more about the theories behind Oltmann’s work on the Goodman Gallery’s exhibitions page, and view his Artsy page here. (Via Faith is Torment)

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Ward Roberts

Ward RobertsWard Roberts was born in Australia and currently lives in Hong Kong and Australia. His work of quiet images depicting various lonesome landscapes are impressive. His contemporary eye has caught active locations and made them obsolete. Pretty neat.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Human Castles

In the city of Tarragona, Spain, castellers gather every two years to see who can build the highest, most intricate human castles. It requires astonishing strength, finesse, and balance.

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Kelly Kerrigan

When Nashville native Kelly Kerrigan isn’t handcrafting her signature “tramp lamps” from scrap lingerie, she enjoys working with paint on canvas. The strange, yet storybook-like works she creates intrigue, maybe even provoke a little laughter, as, all the while, it is wondered what sort of underlying narrative has brought together Boba Fett and a large, fuzzy rabbit.

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Paul Octavious

Chicago’s Paul Octavious creates imaginative and whimsical scenes from household objects and everyday life.  His work is full of clever ideas that always make me smile.  Make sure to check out his gravity-defying “The Book Collection” where he plays a literary Jenga to spell out words and numbers.

See more of Paul’s work at his website and below the jump.  Then see how many books you can stack up.

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Robbie Porter

The works of Scottish illustrator Robbie Porter have a charming simplicity to them that pulls the viewer in.  Each illustration feels as if it’s been pulled out of a vintage mystery novel that you just can’t put down.

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