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Zbigniew Libera

594a_1228158430-copy594b_1228158430Polish artist most well known for his Lego Concentration Camp piece. Apparently Lego gave him the pieces without knowing too much about his true intentions and alas, refused to have anything to do with him when they realized it. There’s a whole bunch of other amazing work on his site, like this little hairy baby that you can shave. By the way, we at Beautiful/Decay in no way shape or form, support Facism or baby-shaving..

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Man In The Box

It’s Friday and after a long week at the office I feel like dancin! By Electrocinema.

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Run Wrake

If you attended one of the previous annual Animation Shows, you may have seen Run Wrake’s short animation “Rabbit” (and me!) From the show, Run Wrake’s film was one of my favorites. He used elements from the classic Dick and Jane books to weave an equally classic tale of greed and it’s horrible consequences. I love how, just like in the Dick and Jane books, everything in every scene is accurately labeled.

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Qie Zhijie’s Oil Barrel Dragon And Tree Sculptures

Chinese artist Qie Zhijie is known for working in mediums as diverse as calligraphy to performance art.  Much of his work, though, is tied together by a subtle mischievousness.  These two sculptures constructed by Qie, Oil Can Dragon and Cash Cow, are no exception.  Both sculptures are entirely built from skillfully cut oil barrels.  Considering the dragon and the tree are both symbols strongly tied to the natural world it’s clear Qie’s choice of using oil barrels wasn’t a trivial one.  In Cash Cow, an imposing tree of six stacked oil barrels, Qie contrasts birds perching on boughs and cut from metal lids with an airplane high its branches.

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Robert Landau’s Photographs Of Larger Than Life Rock ‘n’ Roll Billboards On The Sunset Strip In The 1960’s

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Photographer Robert Landau captured stunning rock ‘n’ roll billboards in the late ’60s and ’70s. Primarily inspired by album art, the billboards were massive monuments that took on a life of their own. Reigning over the Sunset Strip, which was at the time the lifeblood of the music industry, the billboards became more than just advertisements. They were physical embodiments of a vibrant scene populated by colorful rock stars and tantalizing music idols. 

In an interview with Collectors Weekly, Landau says, “There was a whole scene going on along the Strip, but it was really focused on rock ’n’ roll. The billboards captured all that energy, and also some of the excess of money and drugs.” The billboards themselves were anything but flat; at the time, they were hand painted using specific techniques to ensure they could be read from a distance.
Around the time billboards roamed the streets was also the height of some true album art artistry. “It was a joint process,” Landau says of the intersection of the two, “… in most cases, the musicians had already commissioned amazing artwork for their albums.” The tricky part was then translating the album art from a square sleeve to the more traditional rectangular frame of a billboard. The solution was to add an extra dimension to it, enabling figures and objects to burst out of the picture and become almost 3D in effect. Billboard artists got creative, lighting up 3D lampshades and creating silhouettes that seemed to loom like titans.
“It wasn’t about getting somebody to a cash register to buy something,” Landau says, commenting on the uniqueness of these everyday artworks. “It was about creating an image, and about a trust between the artist and the record companies.”
Even as people bemoan the death of the album, at least there are photos like Landau’s that remind us of a time when music was larger than life.
Landau’s work will be on exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles starting on March 24th. (via Collectors Weekly)

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Robert Palacios

dale_la_manoThis past weekend I walked into Venice Beach’s Universal Art Gallery and found myself instantly captivated by the paintings of Robert Palacios, which are currently there on display. Robert is a Los Angeles native, and his work spans the mediums of paint, linocuts, paper mache and even avocado pits. His work is marked by vivid colors and everyday narratives, played out by some very unordinary, playful characters. Although not represented in the images here, Robert seems to take great care in selecting the frames for his paintings – thick, gold and gaudy – a choice I couldn’t  have imagined would work so well to complement and complete his paintings.

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Guy Denning, and the power of the human figure

 

Guy Denning of Bristol, UK has been putting out emotive, figurative paintings for almost two decades. He works mostly in oil, perhaps the perfect medium for working with the human figure due to its unique luminous qualities, and he takes the guesswork out of using art as a mirror for the human condition by directly rendering our anguish and strife in muted, stylized tones. He also maintains a pretty awesome daily drawing blog.

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Klara Kristalova’s Ceramic Sculptures Explore The Darker Side of Childhood

Klara Kristalova - Sculpture Klara Kristalova - Sculpture Klara Kristalova - Sculpture

Of her work, Kristalova states, “My ideas are about how it is to live a life; love and fear and what’s in between. I think and draw, looking back on past works, then gather the images together, gauging my own reaction to them, and start to build. I do everything in my studio in my yard, in my kilns. I mainly work alone because even painting a tree trunk has to be done my way, to be the right ugly.”

To view more photos of Kristalova’s work, check out Russ Crest’s 2011 post and/or click below to continue.

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