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Bus Stop Made From 100,000 LEGO Bricks Pops Up In London To Celebrate The Year Of The Bus

bus bus street art brick bus street art bus stop

With Britain celebrating the Year Of The Bus (#YOTB), three major companies teamed up to build an amazing life-sized LEGO bus stop on the Regent Street in London. Constructed from over 100,000 LEGO bricks, it features even the most intricate details and has a personal hashtag (#LEGOBusStop).

Opened to public just a few days ago, this bus stop already received huge attention from city’s visitors and locals. On Sunday, it served as a checkpoint for vintage bus parade and showcased models from the 1820’s up to the most modern Routemasters. According to the TfL spokesman, the bus stop was meant to stay in place until July 15th but the term may be prolonged.

“Many thousands of people pass along Regent Street each day and we hope the new shelter will bring a smile to the face of even a hardened commuter”,–Leon Daniels, TfL’s Managing Director of Surface Transport.

The LEGO bus stop project was initiated by Transport for London and developed together with LEGO and Trueform, a company that specializes in public transport hardware. It took around two weeks to build and appears on the outside of a legendary toy store Hamley’s.

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Burritos Are The Gateway Drug To Fame

sol-poster1Everyones favorite burrito chain is having a video contest for the best homage to the Chipotle menu. Pick your favorite item (I personally love the Veggie Burrito with Corn Salsa) and make a creative short. The crazier the better! Read more about the contest at the I Love Foil  website.

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Cezar Berger AKA Berje

Cezar Berger  AKA Berje is a brazilian illustrator who has a soft side for the dark side. His stippled drawings of demon skulls, goat men, and goblins borrow from traditional tattoo flash but take a left turn towards epic black metal graphics.

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Kenneth Burris’ 21st Century Decadence and Decay

 

Influenced by 21st. century technology like video games, Google earth, Internet, and You-tube, Kenneth Burris drawings become an expression of isolation and sporadic: envisioning apocalyptic tableaux with a future of decadence and decay.

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Indian book cover designs from 1964 to 1984

Book cover, 1972 (front)

Book cover, 1972 (front)

Found these awesome Indian book cover designs from a couple decades ago on A Journey Round My Skull, my go-to blog for all vintage graphic design. Unfortunately, the designers for each of the book covers weren’t listed. You can see the fronts and backs of each book (I only posted either front or back here) and it’s really amazing to see how well integrated the whole of the design is and how designers during that time were just mainly illustrators.

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Benjamin Oliver – In Search of Our Senses

Benjamin Oliver, a recent graduate of the Royal College of Art’s Design Interactions program explores the space between our everyday experiences, inventing prototypes that can give participants a way to experience all new senses. I love the approach Benjamin took in framing his experiments – By creating photographs with such rich narrative, the artist leaves behind a series of bizzarre rooms in which these sensory objects supposedly underwent a round of testing.

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Michal Macku’s Manipulated Gellage Self Portraits

Since the end of 1989, Michal Macku has used his own creative technique which he has named “Gellage” (the ligature of collage and gelatin). The technique consists of transfer the exposed and fixed photographic emulsion from its original base on paper. This transparent and plastic gelatin substance makes it possible to reshape and reform the original images, changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer.

“I use the nude human body (mostly my own) in my pictures. Through the photographic process [of Gellage], this concrete human body is compelled to meet with abstract surroundings and distortions. This connection is most exciting for me and helps me to find new levels of humanness in the resulting work.
I am always seeking new means of expression and, step by step, I am discovering almost unlimited possibilities through my work with loosened gelatin. Photographic pictures mean specific touch with concrete reality for me, one captured level of real time. The technique of Gellage which I am using helps me to take one of these “time sheets” and release a figure, a human body, from it, causing it to depend on time again. Its charm is similar to that of cartoon animation, but it is not a trick. It is very important for me to be aware of the history of a picture and to have a sense of direct contact with its reality. My work places “body pictures” in new situations, new contexts, new realities, causing their “authentic” reality to become relative. I am interested in questions of moral and inner freedom. I do what I feel, and only then do I begin to meditate on what the result is. I am often surprised by the new connections I find in it. Naturally, I start out with a concrete intention, but the result is often very different. And there, I believe, lies a hitch. One creates to communicate what can not be expressed in any other way. Then comes the need to describe, to define.” (via)

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Laura Bird

Laura Bird

Laura Bird, out of London, makes beautiful Norse-Children’s Book Illustration hybrids by illustrating with pen and ink and paint and even papier-mâché. Her illustrations evoke a bit of whimsy with such toothy faces and happy colors, crossing over from paper in the the three-dimensional world.

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