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Nicole Tran Ba Vang’s NSFW Second Skin

Nicole Tran Ba Vang photography

I had to take a double take the first time I looked at Nicole Tran Ba Vang’s photos and installations. Gives a new meaning to the expression “second skin.” Intense!

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Studio Visit: Jacin Giordano

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I recently  had the chance to visit the studio of Jacin Giordano in sunny Miami Florida. Jacin and I went to college together in Baltimore where he received his BFA at Maryland Institute College of Art. He’s  been quite busy as of late with shows at Fredric Snitzer Gallery in Miami as well as Galerie Baumet Sultana in Paris. As you can see from the photo above Jacin’s work is incredibly labor intensive. He uses hundreds (if not thousands) of gallons of glue, paint and god knows what else to create paintings and sculptures filled with deep crevasses and caverns waiting to be explored. Here is a sneak peak at his process, studio and his next batch of work for his 2010 solo show at Frederic Snitzer.

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Yellena James

Allusion

Allusion

 

Yellena James uses pen and ink to create truly exquisite forms. What starts out as a single shape or line blossoms into magnificent mushroom-jellyfish hybrids, feeding my affinity for all things under the sea! Her artwork has been so perfectly described as “colorful arrangements of organic shapes and tangled lines (which) are at once floral and alien, organic and sci-fi, crafty and fantastic.” With each piece she tries to “create an intimate world that posesses its own ethos and its own emotional range.”

 

She’s done illustration work for clients such as Anthropologie and Nike, and her work has appeared in numerous art and design resources and publications like Vogue Australia and Giant Robot.

 

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Rune Olsen at Johansson Projects

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Rune Olsen has created an installation for Johansson Projects in Oakland, CA. The piece addresses the issue of children on leashes, with a nod to Duchamp’s Mile of String. Apparently, Olsen and myself have both become skeptical of this rather primitive method for controlling one’s child. I mean, this is 2010, Lindsay has a scram bracelet, Coco the Pomeranian is accosted with high-pitched buzzing from her collar every time she barks–where are the similar techie solutions to child rearing? Oh right, normally we reserve that sort of methodology for criminals and dogs.

Olsen approaches the issue with a similar sense of humor, while creating a highly confrontational space for the viewer to interact with. A playful installation, addressing a serious concern.

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Louis Cameron

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Very cool show from artist Louis Cameron at I-20 in New York. In my humble opinion, there are few subjects that have as much cultural significance as the American Flag, so it doesn’t surprise me that artists continue to try their hand at reinterpreting the ‘Stars and Stripes’. The paintings in this show depict flags that were created in the 1960’s as a response to the Pan-African Flag (designed by Marcus Garvey), and were meant to symbolically represent the African-American experience. So there, you get some art and a little history lesson on a wonderful sunday afternoon!

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Awesome Video Of The Day: CocoRosie- Lemonade

I have to say that I’ve never been a huge fan of CocoRosie but this video may have just changed my mind. It’s weird, has beautiful sets and costumes, and both aging old ladies and young little girls have beards. What’s there not to like? Kudos to Sub Pop Records and CocoRosie for not doing yet another video with a band playing on stage.

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Ben Rayner

Attention world I have found my new favorite photographer!  London based photographer Ben Rayner is the coolest.  I love his work.  His photographs possess a sort of child-like wonder and enthusiasm to them.  Check out some more of his work after the jump!

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Ted Lawson’s Eerie Sculptures Question The Meaning Of Identity

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Ted Lawson’s figurative work actualizes difficult concepts of physical identity. His work both strips individuality from his subjects while simultaneously forcing character through implications of the viewer, and therefore, complicating the very meaning of identity.

For example, in his piece titled, Eve, referring to the bible’s first woman, he depicts the cycle of a mutating female figure based on her weight. In this work, Lawson juxtaposes bodies with hanging flesh riddled with cellulite against ones simply constructed of skin and bone. The piece forces the viewer to formulate his or her own opinion of which body is the correct body. Or rather, which body correlates to which type of identity. When reflecting on this piece, the viewer is faced with his or her own interpretations of the same woman. It is then that a more interesting question is posed; does this piece prove that physical appearance identifies who we are, or, does it question the importance of the body— is our physical appearance, perhaps, arbitrary to who we are? Is this woman not the same woman in each representation?

The same questions are raised in his piece The Death of Narrative. There we find a naked woman laying, as if posing for a Renaissance painting, perhaps a Venus. However, instead of being surrounded in objects, hues, and sentiments that would then create allegory, this figure is encompassed with a pastiche of plastic objects. She is not grounded in space or time. She has no history, no narrative, and therefore, no implemented meaning. When observing a subjectless subject, one cannot help but to create purpose; it is human nature to understand through vehicles of narrative and history. Thus, by placing a being in a certain trajectory of non-meaning (the artist describes his work as existential), meaning is then inevitably created due to the human brain’s need for association.

Ted Lawson’s work constantly plays with identity not only through narrative, but also through the its relation to art history. His titles are always referential, if not playful. Even in the means by which he makes his work, sculpting through digital technology, is a manipulation of the tradition of his medium. Lawson’s work is a contemporary interpretation of classic quandaries, however, perhaps his work poses more questions, rather than attempting to answer. (via Empty Kingdom)

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