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Rejected Movie Posters For “The Shining” Designed By The Legendary Saul Bass

Saul Bass, The Shining - Illustration, Design Saul Bass, The Shining - Illustration, Design Saul Bass, The Shining - Illustration, Design Saul Bass, The Shining - Illustration, Design

Saul Bass (1920-1996) was a legendary American graphic designer and filmmaker. In 1980, twenty years after collaborating with Stanley Kubrick on storyboards for Spartacus, the two artists came together again to produce posters for The Shining. However, many drafts were needed before the recognizable, yellow one-sheet depicting a crazed, stippled face emerged into existence. Here, you will see four designs from Design Buddy and TOH, all of which Kubrick rejected, his reasons for each scrawled (somewhat harshly) in the margins. Bass’ cover letter and Kubrick’s response are also included.

Among the rejected designs are images of the maze and the hotel, which Kubrick deemed respectively as “too abstract” and “looks peculiar.” Bass also tried more interpretive approaches, such as a toppled tricycle lying eerily inside a hand, or the family of three crumbling into terrifying abstraction. Kubrick’s response was likewise as blunt: “too irrelevant,” “looks like science fiction film.” While Bass’ designs are skillfully done and represent genuine efforts to capture the essence of the groundbreaking psychological horror, most of us would probably agree that the final product — the face disintegrating into madness — suits the film best. (Via The Film Stage).

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Chromosomal visualization

DNA Radio (German experts on biotech) converts the entire human genome to images and audio that will be streaming on the internet 24/7. Isn’t it crazy that figuratively, all we are made up of are these dots? Here’s a little science lesson for you…

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Rafael Gómezbarros’ Giant Ant Installations Shed Light on the Plight Of Migrant Workers

Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
Rafael Gómezbarros
 Rafael Gómezbarros

Casa Tomada is a project of traveling installations started in 2007 by Colombian artist Rafael Gómezbarros in which giant sculptures of ants are fixed in swarms on buildings and structures. Self-described as “urban intervention” by Gómezbarros, the ants have been showcased in locations varying from London to Cuba with a very specific goal in mind: shedding light on immigration, forced displacement, and uprooting through historical points of departure for travelers and immigrants. The 2-foot ants themselves are crafted out of tree branches for legs and two joined skull casts made of fiberglass resin and fabric to make up the torso, making for a particularly morbid, visceral depiction of migrant workers in Latin America who are looked at as nothing more than vermin.

When placed on the facades of government buildings and blank gallery walls alike, the ants give off a chilling sense of foreboding and encroachment. By placing them in swarms, Gómezbarros makes the insects even more strikingly representative of the peasants displaced by war and strife in Gómezbarros’ native Colombia. The giant insects that make up Casa Tomada, which translates to Seized House, are certainly works that are bound to linger with viewers, whether in nightmares or otherwise.

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Manal Al Dowayan’s installation illustrates Saudi women’s struggle for freedom

Manal Al Dowayan- Sculpture

Manal Al Dowayan- Sculpture

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Manal Al Dowayan is a Saudi Arabian contemporary art photographer based in London, Dubai and her native land of Saudi. The basis of her work is black-and-white photography, however she recently introduced more layers to her work by working on sculpture and installations .

Suspended Together, first displayed on the 54th Venice Biennale’s The Future of Promise exhibition is comprised of 200 fiberglass doves that hang from the ceiling by transparent nylon thread. Each of these doves are imprinted with images of written postcards and stamps.

The piece is visually striking and it evokes an interesting set of complex emotions and ideas that challenge the spectator’s view on Saudi women and their initiatives and downfalls to find freedom. At first glance, Suspended Together gives the impression of movement and freedom, however, a closer look, leaves the spectator looking at doves that are static in movement, suspended in flight. Manal tells Nafas Magazine that the written text and images imprinted in the doves are real “permission documents issued by an appointed guardian when they [women, in this case successful professionals] have to travel [get surgery, or any type of important procedure]” ; women in Saudi are not able to conduct themselves freely, and although reforms to improve the visibility and freedom of women look promising, they don’t seem to pass through King Abdullah, Saudi Arabia’s leader. This struggle is visually present in Manal’s work, as she successfully implements imagery that illustrates the contradiction of many important women that found success in their profession [the dove], yet find themselves suspended in flight, as they try to find their way to do the small tasks of everyday life with volition and freedom from their ‘guardians’.

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Hilarious Letterpress Notes

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These letterpress cards are the product of a collaboration between Sapling Press and the Dear Blank, Please Blank project.  Dear Blank, Please Blank is a site which asks visitors to write short “letters” written in a  dear…, please…, sincerely, … style.  The letters on site range from humorous to sarcastic to bitter.  Several of the succinct witty letters have been put to letterpress Sapling Press resembling notes typed on vintage typewriters.  Here is a selection of some of Sapling’s and DBPB’s hilarious offerings.

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Zines & Books Galore!

 

It’s always fun getting zines, books, and artist editions in the mail. Recently we got a cornucopia of goodies in the mail so we thought we’d share.

1. Jammer SlammerMakeout Creek Books

R. Nicholas Kuszyk and his gang of robots have been part of the B/D family since the beginning. You’re probably used to his massive murals painted all over the world but from time to time Mr. Kusyzk puts down the spray paint and paint brushes to do a bit of publishing.  His new book Jammer Slammer is part robot comic book part epic futuristic philosophical musings.

2. The Rattling WallNarrow Books

Our good buddies at Narrow Books have teamed up with PEN Center USA to bring you this ongoing literary journal featuring sophisticated short fiction, travel essays, and poetry alongside cutting edge illustrations by  Albert Reyes and B/D’s very own Lyndsey Lesh. Get both of their current releases here.

3. Esther Pearl Watson & Mark Todd ZinesFun Chicken

Illustration guru couple Easther Pearl Watson & Mark Todd recently handed over a small mountain of their zines, books, and stickers over to me. They have too many titles to list here so just head over to their shop and stock up now!

 

 

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Tom Feiler’s Cinema

Tom Feiler’s photographs look like stills from your next favorite movie. Who doesn’t like a romantic comedy starring a giant food as the male lead?

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Interview: Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha is not unlike a medieval alchemist, transmuting discarded materials into works of art—morphing civilization’s dusty detritus into works of stunning beauty. They freely collapse ideological mores, the annals of history, contemporary art, yet transcend concretized fact or fiction. Instead, they resurrect their charred faces, standing as relics from a near distant future, or war-ravaged effigies to a post-apocalyptic past. This practice of temporal and physical shape-shifting seems to be both esoteric and playful at once—Bhabha notes that “turning lead into gold, or at least trying…is more interesting than just using gold.” Her visceral effigies are perhaps best described as “anti-monuments;” her works, in their materiality, do not desire permanence—rather, Bhabha formalizes their very transience through her use of ephemeral, corruptible and humble materials. 

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