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Carey Fruth’s American Beauty Inspired Series Challenges Notions Of Ideal Body Types

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Lying on a bed of lilacs, here are a dozen of women being themselves and embracing it. A statement a lot of women have trouble owning, according to Carey Fruth who has made the decision to show that there is only blond tall thin American standards in movies. By making these series, she speaks to women and gives them the powerful message of acceptance and freedom of their own bodies.

Inspired by one of the scenes in the movie American Beauty where a middle aged man is fantasizing about a teenage girl, she decides to take the power back from this perfect girl and to give it to women out there, that are as beautiful but not perceived as such by society.
The models posing sensually are all volunteers, acquaintances to the photographer. They come from different backgrounds, ethnicities, have different body shapes, ages. The girls are not directed during the shoot, they are just told to be themselves. The result are these beautiful women revealing their femininity, authenticity and vulnerability.

Through her work, Cary Fruth wants to fight positive image by having women accepting their bodies: “by stepping into a fantasy dream girl world and by letting go of that fear, they free themselves up to direct that energy they once wasted on telling themselves that they weren’t good enough to elsewhere in their life”.
She also wants to prove her peers that there is no failure when it comes to telling the truth in photography. Apparently most photographers are “scared that if they do something all inclusive and different from the current ideal of beauty that people will not come to their business”. The success of the ‘American beauty’ series is the living proof that good things come to those who believe.
In every aspect, Cary Fruth’s concept and photographs are feeding us with positivity and hope.

See more of the ‘American Beauty’s series on Cary Fruth’s personal website and discover how she empowers women within the San Franscico studio Shameless Photo.

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Dirty Projectors’ Brought Major Excitement To A Small Club

Dirty Projectors’ David Longstreth performing at the Troubadour February 5, 2013.

Dirty Projectors‘ recent sold out show at the Troubadour in Los Angeles was filled with hardcore fans that even surprised singer David Longstreth, “You don’t see a lot of moshing at a Dirty Projectors show”, but that was exactly what was happening about mid-way through their set. The band who usually performs in much larger venues were definitely in high spirits for the hour and a half show that included many songs from their latest release, Swing Lo Magellan as well as songs from their lengthy discography.

“This is the most reluctant catwalk I’ve ever seen”, Longstreth shouted out referring to the Troubadour’s very small center stage extension as he began to do a little rock star posing of his own. They really shined during their three song encore playing one of their most popular singles, Stillness Is The Move that had everyone in the crowd wildly dancing. They finished with their song, Impregnable Question from their latest which was the perfect ending to one of the best shows I’ve seen them perform.

No other dates have been announced, but last year Longstreth wrote and directed a short film produced by Pitchfork.tv and YouTube called Hi Custodian which stars the band and features the music from Swing Lo Magellan, it’s just over twenty minutes long and is a must see.

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Chris Burnside

Chris Burnside

 

Feast your eyes on Chris Burnside‘s exquisite cut/panel pieces. At first glance, his lines seem to be painted with black acrylic. However, upon closer inspection, you will find that these lines are actually tiny cracks formed via Burnside’s unique breaking-apart-and-reassembling process. It’s like piecing together an aesthetically pleasing, super abstract puzzle with colors highly reminiscent of graffiti. 

 

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A 92 Year Old Grandmother Creates Incredible Embroidered Temari Balls

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At the best of times, embroidery can be impressive and time consuming, but this project shows us just how much of an art form it can be. Flickr user NanaAkua has been uploading pictures of her grandmother’s embroidered balls for a while now, educating us all about an ancient art form popular in Japan. Called Temari balls, they are folk art that originated in China, but were quickly adopted by Japan. And this very talented Japanese grandmother in particular has been embroidering Temari balls for over 30 years – building a collection of over 500 balls. Made from the threads from old kimono, the Temari balls are intricate, full of imaginative patterns and as diverse as they are colorful.

They are traditionally cherished as objects of friendship and loyalty. The bright colors symbolize luck and happiness for the recipient of the gift. And it isn’t only considered an honor to receive a Temari ball, but also to produce them. To qualify as a Temari ball artist, the individual has to display a high level of skill and technique.

Here’s a little bit of more information on the amazing art form that are Temari balls:

Traditionally, temari were often given to children from their parents on New Year’s Day. Inside the tightly wrapped layers of each ball, the mother would have placed a small piece of paper with a goodwill wish for her child. The child would never be told what wish his or her mother had made while making the ball. (Source)

You can see the full collection here. (Via Juxtapoz)

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Satoshi Araki Obsessive Dioramas Of Destruction And Decay

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Following on from the trend of “Ruin Porn” or “Ruin Photography“, Japanese artist Satoshi Araki intricately creates miniature dioramas of bombed out cities or urban landscapes. He is attracted to anything that is in a state of decay. He is especially adept at reconstructing tiny details he finds through using Google Image Search. For example he searches for particular phrases (“Iraq war” or “Iraq ruins”) and meticulously recreates what he finds.

Obviously Araki has a sharp eye for details. Using knives and blades to scrape off paint and to add rust, he achieves realistic imperfections, turning a normal miniature scooter into a thing of amazement. He even adds cans with miniscule Arabic writing on them, tucked inside a box in one of his destroyed scenes of Baghdad. He makes sure to carefully smash the tiny windshield of a car, denting it in all the right places, and even adding a bent license plate all to create a believable environment. For such scenes full of violence and horror, he surely makes them a thing of beauty and wonder.

There is a strong sense of poetry in Araki’s work. He focuses on the destruction of man made buildings and objects – mainly being overtaken by nature. Trees grow over old rusted cars; grass forces it’s way through rotting rubber tires. And this is the fascination that other Ruin Porn artists have as well. They all capture the beauty of the world we have created around us crumbling to the ground. And just like Araki, they find joy in that chaos. They celebrate the beauty of the piles of rubble we live in.

You can marvel at more of his amazing work here and here.
(Via Spoon Tamago)

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Yoshimasa Tsuchiya’s Unknown Creatures

Yoshimasa Tsuchiya’s beautifully delicate creatures are painstakingly carved out of wood and hand painted. Check out the Making page on his site to see the process.

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Christina Bothwell’s Fantastical Glass Creatures Will Inspire You

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Christina Bothwell

Christina Bothwell

Christina Bothwell

Christina Bothwell, an American artist, is creator of all things weird. These fantastic yet strange beings (Bothwell’s sculptures) are both creepy but inevitably inspiring. Bothwell’s intriguing sculptures invite the viewer to imagine fantastical worlds; ones where these weird creatures could potentially exist in.

Most often made from cast glass and clay, her made-up creatures are sometimes fitted out with found objects that serve as limbs and other body parts. The glass allows for a more ethereal, surreal feel; it also allows for a soft light to radiate through the figure, simultaneously revealing beauty yet the imperfections found within the glass. This aspect of the work is representative of Bothwell’s interest in notions of vulnerability and childhood innocence. Christina states that her ideas are in many ways autobiographical; the pieces certainly arise from what is going on in her current adult life, or what has gone on in her early childhood. (via Feather of Me)

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Ellen Jewett Sculpts Flowing Creatures Woven With Tiny Plants, Animals, And Objects

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Ellen Jewett is a Canadian artist who creates flowing sculptural fusions of plants, animals and objects. Among her mystical menagerie is a wild boar with shrubs growing from its mane, foxes with tails sprouting into grass, and a deer whose body resembles a tree-shrouded grove. As singular beasts, Jewett’s creatures are beautiful and dynamic, but look closer and you will see that each one is composed of tinier parts, microcosms of flora, fauna, and objects that weave seamlessly together. These layered components infuse each sculpture with multiple narratives, from celebrations of life and growth, to stories of death, decay, and burden in the form of manmade debris. As Jewett explains:

At first glance my work explores the more modern prosaic concept of nature: a source of serene nostalgia balanced with the more visceral experience of ‘wildness’ as remarkably alien and indifferent. Upon closer inspection of each ‘creature’ the viewer may discover a frieze on which themes as familiar as domestication and as abrasive as domination fall into sharp relief.  (Source)

Jewett makes the sculptures from the inside out, layering materials and utilizing negative space to create hollowed works that flow into the air around them: dense frames unravel into breezy foliage and empty space, creating habitats for fluttering, sculpted birds. The results of these disentangled bodies are creatures that speak their strengths via expressions of lightness, vulnerability, and emotion. Jewett describes this effect:

Over time I find my sculptures are evolving to be of greater emotional presence by using less physical substance: I subtract more and more to increase the negative space. The element of weight, which has always seemed so fundamentally tied to the medium of sculpture, is stripped away and the laws of gravity are no longer in full effect. In reading the stories contained in each piece we are forced to acknowledge their emotional gravity cloaked as it is in the light, the feminine, the fragile, and the unknowable.  (Source)

As part of her creative and flowing artistic practice, Jewett strives to free her work from materials with toxic properties, such as glazes, paints, and finishes. This greatly limits what she can use, but at the same time, incites her imagination and makes her work even more unique. “Where possible I source the natural, the local, the low impact and, always, the authentic,” she writes (Source). Check out Jewett’s website for more beautiful and holistic creations. (Via Lost at E Minor)

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