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Green Art: 10 Artists Working with Recycled Materials

David Edgar, "Green Fiesta Jellyfish Lamp"

David Edgar, "Green Fiesta Jellyfish Lamp"

The people of the United States alone toss out millions of plastic bottles every hour, and in a year, enough plastic film to shrink wrap Texas (which would be both a hilarious and horrifying feat.) Everyone knows it’s important to recycle, but it’s often hard to realize the consequences of forgetting about one little bottle; maybe we should consider not buying this stuff in the first place. (I drink out of the tap all the time, heck, I’d drink out of the hose.) Without getting on a soapbox, the following artists have made powerful statements about the ways in which we waste…. by re-using materials that would otherwise be thrown away, and removing paper and plastics completely from the recycling loop…. as even the act of recycling uses massive amounts of energy.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Fluid Dress

Sure Lady Gaga wears dresses with moving parts but does she have any that are made out of 600 feet of tubing with fluid flowing through them? Nope she doesn’t! Luckily Charlie Bucket created this bizarre fluid dress that will surely find its way into Lady G’s wardrobe. Watch the full video of the dress and another fluid sculpture after the jump.

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Nicolas Holiber’s Creates A Brilliant Goliath’s Head Made Out Of Colorful Trash

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Nicolas Holiber works in the middle of unwanted pieces of wood and thrown away shipping pallets. He also recycles feathers, nails and found objetcs. In his Brooklyn based studio, he creates instinctively from this magical chaos. The result is expressive, colorful mixed media sculptures representing portraits and busts of kings. One of the most emblematic ones, Goliath; from the famous tale David and Goliath is currently installed at Tribeca Park, in the heart of New York.

The sculptures come alive after being assembled, destructed and rebuilt. The process is the same each time, no exceptions. Nicolas Holiber creates from doing; with the intent of building beautiful things from a mess. Give him trash, reclaimed wood and a couple of nails and he will be able to come up with a bold, vibrant and stimulating piece of art. He will only be satisfied when he can look at the piece over and over without feeling the urge to retouch it.  But beware, beautiful and finished doesn’t mean perfect. He doesn’t want anything to look too figurative. His work has to feel new and exciting. Otherwise, It just doesn’t work for him.

Until recently, the artist used to create for his own pleasure. He still does but he now shares his work by teaching sculpting classes, attending residencies (the next one is scheduled for Spring 2016 at Governor’s Island) and showing his work to the art scene.

Nicolas Holiber’s Goliath is at Tribeca Park, New York City until July 2015.

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Illumination Ink

Illumination Ink

Illumination Ink hails from Newcastle, Australia, adding another international post to our Around The World Day here at BD (not really). Heath Killen contrasts his beige-y website with his sometimes bold, sometimes colorful, sometimes remixed images. I really like the use of typography with his illustrations, and the vintage look to his collage-like works.

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Shan Hur’s Excavated Sculptures

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Shan Hur‘s sculptures interact with the gallery space in a unique way.  He embeds his sculptural work inside walls and pillars throughout the space.  Each piece almost seems if it is in the middle of being excavated right out of the gallery wall.  In this way the sculpture brings the entire gallery into the work of art, and by extenstion its visitors.  Interestingly, Hur says of his work:

“One of the issues I have focused on is how to reduce the burden of the volume of sculpture.  I then connect this mass to its surroundings, but not just as part of the whole.  I think sculpture should communicate with its circumstances.”

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Kids Play Hard. Adults Play Harder.

The following series of photos are apart of an ad-campaign for Italian Based shoe firm, Luciano Carvari. Using these playfully surrealistic images, the photographer feeds off the wacky, bold, and daring styles of the shoes to create an intense visual. When viewing the photographs for the first time there is an obvious juxtaposition between child’s play and adult situations. The role reversal captures your attention and never lets it go.

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Ikea Style Instructions To Assemble Your Favorite Monsters

harrington- ikea illustration

harrington- ikea illustration

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Black and white line illustrations, no written instructions, umlauts scattered like rose petals, that smiley cartoon guy—this certainly looks familiar. Illustrator Ed Harrington has subverted the ubiquitous directions sheet for his “Ikea Instruction” series. In Harrington’s world, it’s not streamlined Swedish furniture that’s being assembled, but monsters, killers, and Edward Scissorhands.

The clever illustrations make use of all of Ikea’s standard elements: the illustrated pieces, the bold sans-serif font, the crossed-out warning images. The Vörhees requires a simple assembly of one very large knife, one hockey mask, and one Allen wrench, whereas the Edvard needs 14 units of two different types of scissors, a heart, and hand removal. So far the DIY instruction sheets include Brundlefly from The Fly, a Human Centipede, Jason Voorhees from Friday the 13th, Edward Scissorhands and Pinhead, the Cenobite leader from Hellraiser.

Merging two incredibly popular, and incredibly different, pop culture genres makes this series work. Who could be next in the flat pack? Perhaps a small striped shirt, overalls, and an axe. Who wants to build Chücky?

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Ryan Bradley’s Butterfly Effect


Ryan Bradley’s large, intricately composed pastel paintings of attractive female faces are seductive.  The delicate paintings are “unfixed,” which means the pastel is left loose.  This creates a surface similar to butterfly wings.  If you touched the paintings, some would rub off onto your hands.  I can’t help but think there is some relationship between the fragility of the surface and the portraits’ beauty.  Like the really ripe moment when someone is at the tops of their looks, you know it can’t last, but you can look away either.

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