Get Social:

Janne Lehtinen’s Sacred Bird

Telling the story of a young man – the author himself – and his attempts to fly with different kinds of self-made aeroplanes and wings, the photographic series “Sacred bird” by Finnish photographer Janne Lehtinen presents a fictional narrative based on autobiographical facts. Lehtinen – the son of a renowned glider pilot – tries to relive the experiences of his father while himself attempting to leave the ground behind. His numerous efforts to oppose the force of gravity never come to anything, however, and the giant leap into infinity never occurs. While the models he conceives are extravagant, surreal and impressive in their construction, they are nevertheless destined to fail, and remain purposeless, anachronistic reinventions of the human-powered prototypes which marked the pioneering days of aviation. –Dominique Somers

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

A Day In Decay: Chinatown & Jeremy Mora Studio

Jeremy Mora Sculpture

A few weeks back I headed over to Chinatown to visit Jeremy Mora‘s studio. You may know Jeremy from POVevolving gallery, but he also makes some great sculptures. Before we pop in on Jeremy’s studio, let’s check out some vintage signs down Chung King road.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Baroque Frames And Adornments Carved From Cardboard

Jillian Salik installation6 Jillian Salik installation3

Jillian Salik installation2

The artwork of Jillian Salik offers up understated surprises.  Her new exhibit DUEL TINT features frames, window dressing, and other wall fixtures adorned with baroque ornamentation.  However, the typically gilded and gaudy colors that typically accompany such adornments, the reflections and windows that should fit in such frames were no where to be seen.  Salik only offers the bare structure of the frames and ornamentation.  Also, Salik makes an interesting choice of material: cardboard.  She contrasts high-society trimmings and embellishments with a decidedly “low” material and digital production processes.

Currently Trending

Sashiko Yuen’s Technicolor Nightmare: A Psychedelic Bubblegum Take On Violent Female Emotions

Sashiko YuenSashiko Yuen

Sashiko Yuen

tiredofyourshit

Sashiko Yuen aka Wishcandy has created what she describes as “a sassy candy coated horror show”. Her series “Rise and Fall of the Sugar Brigade” places the female body at the junction of pulp violence and erotica which transports you through a technicolor nightmare. Her watercolor and graphite dreamscapes place girls of all different body types in candy filled landscapes, often displaying violent emotions accompanied by titles like “ Bring it”,“Tired of your shit” , and “ You don’t own me” brandishing butchers knives or baseball bats with tears running down their cheeks.

Rather than putting the female body on display, her work expresses angst, vengeance and rage through an unexpected use of color, the depiction of food not only as part of the background but also as a prop and the use of sex as a power over one’s womanhood. One of her pieces entitled “Escapism” features a girl with pink hair lounging on a giant pizza slice with an adamant look on her face. It is thought provoking in the sense that bright colors and girls are not often used associated with deeper, darker topics and emotions.

Upon first glance, Wishcandy’s work looks colorful and cute, but it runs much deeper. It is full of intricate details, colors, and shapes that create an edgy and unique depiction of female emotion. She confronts the viewer with blood, violence, and frustration while using the brightest colors reminiscent of early 1950s and does not shy away from the grotesque. You can really feel the female energy coursing through her work in a way that makes it seem like it should be cover art for an all girl rock band.

Currently Trending

Brandon Bird’s Subversive Pop Culture Paintings

Brandon Bird lives and works in Los Angeles. Utilizing an array of pop culture references he creates disarming paintings. The work is whimsical, dark, and subversive in equal measure. One piece depicts a child on Halloween dressed as Philip Seymore Hoffman’s nurse character from the film Magnolia. Despite being downright bizarre it is a hilarious reminder of the cheap Character Costumes of old that consisted of nothing more than a plastic mask and an image of the character on a sticky vinyl wardrobe. Another painting shows the eccentric actor Christopher Walken in the middle of creating a robot in his garage. A visual such as this embodies the joy that permeates through Bird’s hysterical pop culture laced paintings.

Currently Trending

Hiroyuki Shinozaki’s Open House

For anyone who grew up in the 80’s & 90’s, Hiroyasu Sakaguchi’s House T will look vaguely familiar, namely because House T is laid out like a level in Mario, or most other Nintendo games for that matter. All the spaces in a house that we have gotten used to as individual, semi-private rooms have been stripped of their walls and joined into one long inter-connected space. I love it because it reminds us of the tension between psychological and physical space, how we compartmentalize various aspects of our life into respective spaces. House T reminds me of Gordon Matta Clark’s work, albeit much cleaner, Japanese, and way less punk rock, but the altering of our perception of space is in them both. (via)

Currently Trending

Matt Lee

29_2912

From illustrator and photographer Matt Lee, here are some photos of film posters around South India. It’s interesting how foreign film industries so close follow American trends. I expected to see posters that are more in the style of traditional 70s Bollywood posters (basically nicely illustrated montages of multiple characters, each in an action pose, and a cool look treatment of the title), but it seems that just as Hollywood has moved on since its days of ornately illustrated movie posters, so has India. So instead of illustrations we have Photoshop jobs.

Currently Trending

Street Artist “Don’t Fret” Is Bringing Comedy Into The Streets

2014-03-19-brooklynstreetartdontfretjaimerojo0314web3-thumb

2014-03-19-brooklynstreetartdontfretjaimerojo0314web10-thumb
2014-03-19-brooklynstreetartdontfretjaimerojo0314web6-thumb 2014-03-19-brooklynstreetartdontfretjaimerojo0314web8-thumb

Chicago-based street artist Don’t Fret is plastering New York with his wit and wisdom. Producing relatively simple images and text posters, he uses wheat paste to adhere them to walls and mailboxes They live among the torn down flyers and spray-painted graffiti adn look inconspicuous until you really stop to look at them.

Don’t Fret’s humor is observational, and sometimes silly. “Live by the sword. Die by your peanut allergy,” and “Polly saw you commit adultery” are both easy to “get” and amusing for the passerby. All images copyright of Jaime Rojo. (Via Huffington Post)

Currently Trending