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Ben Frost

Ben Frost

Australian artist Ben Frost’s Lost in the Supermarket (now showing at Bout, a reference to The Clash song, remarks on the over stimulation, confusion and daily hypnosis we are trapped by, as we struggle to stand still on a buzzing psychedelic landscape of brands, identities and social demands.

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Nest Made from 10,000 Reclaimed Wood Boards By Mark Reigelman

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Artist Mark Reigelman‘s new site-specific installation is aptly titled Reading Nest.  The structure was created just outside the Cleveland Public Library using thousands of reclaimed wood boards.  Reading Nest acts as an alternative setting for learning and growth.  In his statement Reigleman says of the installation’s symbolism:

“For centuries objects in nature have been associated with knowledge and wisdom. Trees of enlightenment and scholarly owls have been particularly prominent in this history of mythological objects of knowledge. The Reading Nest is a visual intermediary between forest and fowl. It symbolizes growth, community and knowledge while continuing to embody mythical roots.”   [via]

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Heart-wrenching Burial Photos Of Dead Animals Abandoned On The Road

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For her series Natura Morta, the Russian photographer Maria Ionova-Gribina gives burials to dead animals. Much like fellow artist Emma Kiesel, she finds her deceased subjects abandoned on roadsides. Biking to the sea in summer, she was confronted with roadkill and creatures who had died of natural causes.

Where most might avert their eyes, she examined the called bodies, adorning them with fresh blossoms tenderly picked from her own garden or nearby flower beds. Yet she does not remove or bury the remains; instead, she allows the process of photographing them to stand in for funerary rites, poignantly preserving them in her lens instead of in the earth.

After having these powerful post-mortem portraits taken, the animals are once again vulnerable to the decay and ravages of death, but in this single magnificent instant, their humble yet miraculous existences are celebrated and revered. Juxtaposed against bloodied muzzles, open wounds and limbed stiffened by death are ripe, vibrant flowers symbolizing life and rebirth. On these breathtaking beds of pink, blue, and deep red hues, the creatures appear to be simply sleeping.

Over these dead bodies, we are invited to mourn the individual as well as the fact of our own lost innocence. The series itself is inspired by Ionova-Gribina’s childhood, when she and her brother would bury dead animals they discovered in their paths. Where the adult gaze scans over reminders of death, perhaps the child’s engages with them, and grieves the inevitable hold of mortality. Take a look. (via Feature Shoot)

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Bruno Kurru

Bruno Kurru

Bruno Kurru, of Brazil, uses drawing, painting, photography and collage, mixing them together to create a singular kind of artwork. I think it’s safe to call him a “mixed media artist!”

 

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Aaron Noble & Greg Lamarche @ Guerrero Gallery

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Tomorrow night Guerrero Gallery opens their 7th show with a solo presentation of long time BD favorite Aaron Noble, and a project space offering from  tinkerer of texts, Greg Lamarche. More images and proper info below.

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Klaus Pinchler’s Macro Photos Of Dust Transform Your Mess Into Beautiful Images

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Pet Shop

Pet Shop

Police Station

Police Station

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Tailor

When photographer Klaus Pichler was moving out of his old apartment in Vienna, he noticed something peculiar about the dust on the floor. In the living room, dust bunnies were red while the mitesin his bedroom were light blue. This led to something of an epiphany for Pichler, and he realized that dust isn’t always gray like we so often see – there are varieties. Inspired by that experience, the photographer started a years-long series that chronicles the accumulation of different dust particles. Aptly titled Dust, it recently culminated into a book of the same name.

Pinchler’s dust gathering was similar to collecting specimens to study. He retrieved them with tweezers, placed each in their own Petri dish, numbered,  and inventoried them. Photographing the dust proved trickier, and it required Pinchler renting an expensive 120mm macro lense and capturing them all within 24 hours. They were left unaltered and their tiny, exquisite beauty shines in these up-close images.

From police stations to subway stations and pet stores, each gathering of dust has its own idiosyncrasies. The pet shop, for instance, has tiny, brightly-colored feathers and wood chips for the animals. There’s less hair in it than the police station, which has threads, metal, and leaves swirling around in a matted ball.

Dust was published by Anzenberger Edition. It’s available for purchase on Pinchler’s website or through Anzenberger Gallery Bookshop. (Via Slate)

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Victor Timofeev

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Victor Timofeev literally fell into drawing a few years ago after a horrid skateboarding accident and began using art to pour out frustrations that were simmering inside. Since then he has developed an amazing vocabulary incorporating perspectival, architectural and geometric patterns that engulf a space with sharp precision and confounding visual illusions. Where his earlier work incorporated obsessive and repetitive text as the base for color and form, he now builds a platform where physical and architectural objects plunge into geometric abstraction and the two forces coerce into infinite and poetic narrative.

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Taylor Baldwin’s Assembled Madness

Taylor Baldwin’s highly crafted sculptures are filled with hundreds pieces that come together to create a complex explosion of texture, color, material, and sculptural techniques. From representational wood carvings to computer assisted laser etched drawings, Taylor combines anything and everything to bring to life his rich pieces that will have you staring at them for hours.

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