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Marc Sinaj’s Hyperrealistic Sculptures Are So Good, People Complain About Them

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Marc Sinaj has such an eye for detail and dedication to quality, that his sculptures have observers constantly mistaking them for actual people. Strangers often try to interact with the figures, talk with them and even complain when they don’t receive any response. Born and based in Milwaukee, Sinaj often spends anywhere from 6 months to a year on a single sculpture (although usually working on multiple ones at the same time), and the hours he invests definitely show in the finished piece. He chooses to replicate figures with stories; people and characters with many wrinkles, pimples, blemishes, pores, stretchmarks, ingrown toenails and grey hairs.

…the vast majority [of the sculptures] are of all shapes and forms, some scrawny, other obese, some old, some young, some weak, some burly, the gamut of humanity. Sijan is like a superb writer in that regard who writes not only about the rich and famous, but instead about all facets of life on earth. (Source)

Working for over 40 years, Sinaj has perfected his skill of realistically reproducing the human form. Carrying on from the traditions of Roman and Grecian marble sculptors, Sinaj is a true modern master of bodies. Painstakingly building up layers of paint, and placing every individual hair, goose bump and freckle exactly where they should be, he shows of the extent of his talent. He never replicates someone without their permission, and always asks before taking their photo, as he is, in a way, cloning them.

Sinaj not only creates unbelievably realistic sculptures, he is effectively turning a mirror back onto ourselves – showing us in such a blinding light, we can’t ignore that humanity (with all of our flaws) is a strange and wonderful thing. He is celebrating the ugliness of reality. (Via Ignant)

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Installation Five Scion Art Tour: Portland

Scion Installation Five

Opening Reception
Thursday, August 6th, 2009 | 6-10pm
Igloo Gallery | ON Gallery | Virtuoso Studios, 323-325 NW 6th St. Portland, OR 97209 [Between Everett and Flanders]

Painting: AJ Fosik, Alex Hornest, Andrew Schoultz, Asylm, Blek le Rat, Codak, David O’Brien, Edwin Ushiro, Francesco LoCastro, French, J. Shea, Jeff Soto, Kelsey Brookes, Kofie, Lisa Alisa, Mark Mothersbaugh, Nicholas Harper, Patrick Martinez, Rob Abeyta Jr., Ron English, Sage Vaughn, Skypage, Souther Salazar, Stormie Mills, Tessar Lo, Todd Tourso, Usugrow, Will Barras, Yoskay Yamamoto

Photography: Angela Boatwright, Christina M. Felice, Eriberto Oriol, Eye One, Jamel Shabazz, Logan Hicks, Peter Beste, RETNA, Rick Rodney, Saber, Too Tall Jahmal

Video Art: El Yem, Ian Lynam, Peter Glover, Something In The Universe, David Choe

Music Provided By :
DJ Rad! | Doctor Adam

www.scion.com/installation

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Yonder

When I sleep at night this is what my dreams look like. OKAY….. maybe they don’t look like this but I wish they did.

By Emilia Forstreuter

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Kip Omolade’s Hyper-realistic Paintings Of African Masks Highlights Our Own Immortality

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Multi-media artist Kip Omolade paints captivating portraits based on realistic African sculptures. His new series Diovadiova Chrome is a collection of hyper realistic, super saturated, luminous faces that are a result of a labor intensive process. Omolade first makes a mold of each model’s face out of plaster, casts it in resin, adds a layer of chrome and extravagant artificial eyelashes. This final version of the sculpture is then used as a model for the oil painting. Omolade says his paintings are:

historically connect[ed] to ancient, realistic African sculptures such as Benin ivory masks and Ife bronze heads. The oil paintings are psychological studies that investigate immortality, the universal masks we all wear and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury.

He goes on to say that his re-imagining of the masks are a conduit between the spiritual and natural world. He has exhibited the actual representations of the masks as well, as a kind of homage to the history of African culture being on display. His expertise in the African Art genre (gained from working at The Center for African Art in NYC) has fueled his passion for promoting awareness of the indigenous culture. To see more of his impressive images, see after the jump.

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Rhythm and Hues: Cloth and Culture of Mali

hm_banner_rightMali’s extraordinary legacy of textile arts, with its vibrant colors and complex graphic statements will be presented in an exhibition entitled “Rhythm and Hues: Cloth and Culture of Maliat the Museum of Craft and Folk Art in San Francisco from February 5-May 2, 2010.

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Aaron Noble, Interviewed!


Beautiful/Decay + By Osmosis TV Presents Interview with Aaron Noble from Beautiful/Decay Magazine on Vimeo.

Beautiful/Decay teamed up with By Osmosis TV to profile piece on painter Aaron Noble in this new video. Aaron is a longtime friend of B/D. You can find his work on B/D’s Caliph shirt among other places.

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Afghan Star

Just watched Afghan Star yesterday and was extremely impressed by this Sundance Award winning Documentary….

After 30 years of war and Taliban-rule, pop culture has returned to Afghanistan. Afghan Star – a Pop Idol-style TV series – is searching the country for the next generation of music stars. Over 2000 people are auditioning and even three women have come forward to try their luck. The organizers, Tolo TV, believe with this programme they can ‘move people from guns to music’.

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Library Of Colorful Decay- Canisters Filled With Unclaimed Insane Asylum Human Remains

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We’ve posted David Maisel’s work before. His aerial photographs of open mines depict the colorful transformation of polluted areas. His new project, Library of Dust, catalogues individual copper canisters containing the unclaimed remains of patients from the Oregon State Insane Asylum who died sometime between 1883 and the 1970s. Each canister’s chemical decay is uniquely colorful; the aesthetic resonates with transformation indicated in his aerial photography. “Among my concerns with Library of Dust are the crises of representation that derive from attempts to index or archive the evidence of trauma; the uncanny ability of objects to portray such trauma; and the revelatory possibilities inherent in images of such traumatic disturbances. While there are certainly physical and chemical explanations for the ways these canisters have transformed over time, the canisters also encourage us to consider what happens to our own bodies when we die, and to the souls that occupy them.”

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