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César Biojo Paints Portraits And Immediately Destroys Them

César Biojo defines his work as the controlled result of multiple accidents; the coexistence of two opposites: creation and destruction. Biojo starts with the figurative— constructing a character—and when he feels it is perfect he destroys it with the abstraction of extra paint and spatula rips and drags. The result is a perfect imperfection: a focus on the fragility and ephemerality of the human existence that asks if we were perfect for a moment? And then reassures you yes… but that moment has passed.

Biojo’s process is also outlined in this short video: César Biojo • His Work

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Best Of 2012: Robert Fontenot’s Bread Dough Sculptures

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Robert Fontenot’s sculptures, made out of bread dough, present the viewer with extremely humorous, yet severely violent worlds. He’s the author and designer of three books. Two of which are about the histories of ancient mythologies and the other of which is an illustrated history of performance art – that is, in my opinion, far more entertaining than Roselee Goldberg’s classic Performance Art: From Futurism to the Present. However, skillfully sculpting the human form’s most revealing gestures is not Robert Fontenot’s only mastered practice. He also has an ongoing series, where he embroiders textiles, as well as another project entitled Recycle LACMA – in which he buys deaccessioned items from the museum at auction and then turns them into items of use. For example, he transformed a Brocade evening dress into a fully functional fanny pack. If you have your wits about you, then it won’t take long to recognize the awesomeness of Robert Fontenot’s work.

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Do Ho Suh’s ‘Infinitely’ Repeating Sculpture

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Korean artist Do Ho Suh has often explored thoughts on collective strength (and perhaps weakness) in his work before.  However, his new sculpture Karma addresses a more personal collectivity.  This enormous sculpture seems to stretch on perpetually.  At the sculpture’s base a man stands with his eyes covered by another man crouching on his back.  That man’s eyes are also covered by another man crouching on his back and this pattern appears to repeat ad infinitum.  Perhaps a literal visual interpretation of the concept of karma or even the saying ‘history is doomed to repeat itself’.

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Victor Castillo’s Eerie Parable-Like Paintings Of Children In Masks

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The paintings of Victor Castillo have a unique eerie style.  He began drawing from a young age inspired by cartoons, comics, and album covers.  Castillo finally attended art school but found himself disillusioned with his time there.  After leaving school he spent some time working with an experimental art collective in his native country of Chile.  Next Castillo relocated to Barcelona, Spain.  It is in Barcelona that his signature style solidified.

His painted world are most noticeably populated by children wearing clown-like masks: a red nose protrudes from a white face and any eyes are conspicuously absent.  Though the masks smile, there is something disturbingly insincere about the expressions.  Castillo carefully sets up each scene of his paintings almost as a sort of visual parable.  A small narrative unfolds hinting at a larger message.  Political themes such as greed or abuse of power begin to emerge within the symbolism of each piece.  Castillo makes use of narrative tools often found not only in painting, but also comics.  A statement from a past solo exhibit at the Jonathan Levine Gallery further explains the symbolism behind his paintings:

“In this exhibition, Castillo’s allegorical visions of the current socio-economic world crisis come in the form of spooky children’s tales. Through acrylic works on canvas and drawings on paper, his cast of masked, hollow-eyed children serve as a vehicle to convey ominous narratives of survival, greed and indoctrination. Inspired by vintage animation, his paintings are like theatrical sketches of tragicomic situations. With cartoon-like figures in the foreground and lush, classical landscapes in the background, Castillo’s dramatic baroque lighting completes the effect of exposing corrupted innocence.”

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Bruce Catalano’s Figurative Sculptures That Vanish In Space

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For his “Travelers” series, French artist Bruno Catalano sculpts human figures that contain missing pieces. Many of his bronze sculptures are missing a good portion of their torsos, asking the viewer to visually complete the sculptures using the space that surrounds them. The effect of his work varies with the location – a viewer could fill in the figures’ gaps with a variety of images the depend on the sculptures’ surrounding space, from the gallery to the park. Catalano creates an optical illusion, confronting the viewer with an image of impossibility that turns into intrigue. As a former sailor, Catalano has always been interested in the figure of the traveler. He says,

“I have travelled a lot and I left Morocco when I was 12 years old. I felt that a part of me was gone and will never come back. From years of being a sailor, I was always leaving different countries and places each time and it’s a process that we all go through. I feel like this occurs several times during life and of course everyone has missing pieces in his or her life that he wont find again. So the meaning can be different for everyone, but to me the sculptures represent a world citizen.”

Ten of Catalano’s sculptures can be found at the Port of Marseilles. (via the daily mail)

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Maseman

beendownsolong4 Maseman is Mason McFee: an artist, illustrator and designer from Austin, Texas. He is the art director for The Screamer Company and an artist for Cyclopean Records. His work blends illsutration and design with vintage photos. While his work seems to include a lot of geometric shapes and abstract elements, it also has a very organic feel. Much of his work seems to include natural elements, such as a wood background or a landscape image. Check out more of his work after the jump, or go to his website.

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Art Basel Miami: Day 2

Highlights from Day 2: Art Miami & Pulse Art Fair

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The Largest Group Of Works By Hieronymus Bosch To Be Exhibited Together In The Netherlands

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A fairy tale, the garden of Eden and Hell. Hieronymus Bosch was a painter (ca. 1450 to 1516) from the Medieval era representing fantasy landscapes with imaginary and bizarre characters. In one of his most famous painting, ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’ he depicts in a triptych, a multitude of religious symbols blended with amusing dark isolated little scenes.

Hieronymus Bosch’s style is childlike and at the same time stern and serious. On the left side of the triptych, a religious scene. G.od is presenting Eve to Adam in the quiet and peaceful garden of Eden. What is looking like a traditional scene seems in fact to represent the beginning of life and its debauchery. The following part of the painting shows the consequences of a story we know too well nowadays. That is, the story of Adam eating the forbidden fruit and sent with Eve to another land. A land where nothing is in order. Birds and fruits are bigger than humans and seem to have dominated. The animals are feeding the humans. Which, from the look on their faces, are acting like zombies. We are looking at submissive and obedient individuals satisfying their primal needs, mating and eating. The last part of the triptych depicts macabre and violent scenes. The decline of corruption through the representation of hell. People are being tortured and murdered by the animals and other hybrid creatures. Knives, swords and arrows are completing the disastrous landscape.

The set of paintings is ultra-detailed and furthermore for an artist living in the Medieval era. This looks from afar like a tale for children. The naive colors and the rounded shapes makes the art piece easy to watch. That was probably the first intent. The second was to maybe address a message indirectly to the viewers. The story of Adam and Eve disobeying from their original paths and its inevitable deadly consequences is shown to the public. The context of the paintings are unsure but what is unquestionable is the talent, vision and beautiful imagination of Hieronymus Bosch.

The triptych, 20 paintings and 19 drawings, will be displayed at Noordbrabants Museum in the Netherlands as part of the ‘Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of a Genius’ exhibition from February 13th to May 8th 2016. (via Juxtapoz)

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