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So we got an email from Mr. Matt Manos of B/D internship fame, regarding UCLA’s Design Media Arts Undergrad show on Jan 14th. In his words: “what is funny is that me, Kate Slovin, and Corinna Loo are the ones curating it. Also what is funny is that I designed the poster for it and Greg Ruben took the photo for the poster. Also, Cameron Charles will be in attendance. So the show is basically reigned upon by B/D alumni.” Well yay, B/D alumni! More official text after the jump….

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“Art Works Every Time” T-Shirt Teaser

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B/D head of security, Ziggy, models the “Art Works Every Time” t-shirt, which will be given away to the first 100 people to arrive at our opening tomorrow night, June 12 from 8-11!

The shirt features Colin Strandberg’s award-winning design (which you have seen on our exhibition flyer) and super-shiny metallic gold and silver ink! (Shiny!) I’m only exaggerating slightly when I say that this shirt is badder then fixed gears and cigarettes COMBINED. So come early! Details and more of Ziggy vogue-ing it after the cut.

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Robert Ryan Cory

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Robert Ryan Cory is an animation character designer currently working on Nickelodeon’s Spongebob Squarepants. Over at his flickr (linked to his name at the beginning of this post), Cory has posted some fantastic character sketches from the show. I haven’t watched Spongebob in a few years now but I don’t remember it being quite this violent and grotesque. His drawings are like Ren and Stimpy meets Ed “Big Daddy” Roth. Perhaps the show is taking a turn towards the weird(er)?

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Levon Biss’ Celebrity Photography

Celebrity photography is usually quite dull focusing on the popularity and power of the star. So it’s a breath of fresh air to pull up the portfolio of London based photographer Levon Biss and discover images of celebrities that are full of humor, quirky narrative, and unique sets.

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While Visiting Uganda, Photographer Stumbles Upon A Bizarre Set Of Faceless Portraits

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While visiting the town of Gulu in Northern Uganda, Italian photographer Martina Bacigalupo discovered a very unusual set of studio portraits. Despite being perfectly composed, none of them featured a subject’s face as they were all cut out leaving blank rectangles in the photograph. Oddly enough, it appeared to be a common practice in Gulu for taking ID photos.

Bacigalupo visited Uganda searching for ways to document this community, which was suffering from violent conflicts. The first faceless photograph she had stumbled upon lead her to meet Obal Denis, the owner of the oldest photography studio in town, the Gulu Real Art Studio (est. 1973).

“The portraits were well composed, with subjects seated on a chair or on a bench, with a blue, white or red curtain behind them, in various poses and modes of dress. Obal <…> told me the secret behind those pictures: he only had a machine that would make four ID photos at a time, and since most of his clients didn’t need four pictures, he therefore preferred to take an ordinary photograph and cut an ID photo out of it.”

For Bacigalupo, these ‘leftover’ images were the purest form of representation of Gulu’s society. She gathered the unused prints and interviewed clients of Obal’s studio. To most Ugandans, who suffered from more than two decades of war, taking new ID photos marked important changes in their lives: getting a driver’s license, starting a new job or applying for a loan. The value of such events is perfectly conveyed through the subject’s pose, gesture, clothing and other subtle details.

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Sweden’s Tree Hotels

Swedish designers and architects have taken the fad of adult tree house building and made it extraordinarily Swedish in the best way possible at the Tree Hotel. Mirror houses, UFOs with star-print sheets, giant bird nests; these exist in real life. What a wonderful world.( via )

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Bech Scher’s Mixed Media Paintings Explore Women in the Military

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Beth Scher‘s “Female Soldiers” series depicts women in the military adorned with embroidery and other decorative elements. Scher’s mixed media paintings explore ideas concerning femininity and strength. Her images feature women in a variety of military contexts – Scher’s embellishments of her female figures recalls the idea of a “decorated” soldier while also referring to the art of craft and embroidery, concepts normally found within in a domestic setting. In images that include a bulls eye or target image, Scher conceals the women’s faces with black thread, evoking a sense of expendability that must inhabit a conflict-heavy environment. Scher explains, “In my paintings, I portray them as young women who intentionally seek to display their sexuality and vulnerability, yet are trained killers, in a position of power and placed in serious conflicts. I wonder what the consequences are in a society that must deal with this dichotomy.” (via lustik)

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Brandon Muir’s Moving Collages Are What Nightmares Are Made Of

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Artist Brandon Muir creates dark, creepy, digital collages. With creatures such as a vintage pilot whose nose seems to have been burned off, a smiling blue child with red melting eyes, and a boy with a mutated head including a third eye complete with tentacle arms, Brandon Muir’s potential patrons of hell are truly what nightmares are made of. They are reminiscent of The Twilight Zone meets The Munsters meets Basket Case (1982). They are undoubtedly demonic, however, the work also has this sense of playfulness (perhaps solely because they are displayed using the lighthearted platform of the GIF). Muir’s work has an of aura of jest, perhaps taking notes from the type of kitsch found in 1950s horror films. In his own words “[My] one intention with these animations is to ride the line between a disgusted cringe and a smooth chunky chuckle” (source). His process begins as any collage artist’s would — he collects images taken from magazines such as National Geographic and LIFE magazine. After he creates his more traditional collages, he then uses programs such as Photoshop and AfterEffects to formulate the digital rendering. By placing the work into a digital format, Muir allows himself to explore more complex textures, colors, and juxtapositions, creating striking images you can’t seem to get off your mind. (Via The Creators Project)

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