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Joao Oliviera

Joao OlivieraThese transcendentally intergalactic images are like cryptic icons from the future. I’m pretty sure this is what it would look like if an alien landed on earth and created a transmission from his ship that beamed down a chronological history of time cascading into future mankind straight into your dreams.

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Nude Bodies Transform From Flattering To Unflattering With Slight Shift In Pose (NSFW)

Nude Bodies

gracie hagen Nude Bodies

gracie hagen Nude Bodies

Chicago-based artist Gracie Hagen has created a photography series titled “Illusions of the Body” that captures nude bodies in contrasting poses. In the “attractive” image on the left, the models represent their bodies with straight backs, pulled-back shoulders, and demure expressions – many of them stand posed in positions that reflect classical sculpture. In the “unattractive” image on the right, the bodies are turned and the models push out their stomachs, hunch their backs, and evoke expressions of indifference.


From Hagen’s Tumblr:

“‘Illusions of the Body'” was made to tackle the supposed norms of what we think our bodies are supposed to look like. Most of us realize that the media displays only the prettiest photos of people, yet we compare ourselves to those images. We never get to see those photos juxtaposed against a picture of that same person looking unflattering. That contrast would help a lot of body image issues we as a culture have.


Within the series I tried get a range of body types, ethnicities & genders to show how everyone is a different shape & size; there is no “normal”. Each photo was taken with the same lighting & the same angle.

Celebrate your shapes, sizes & the odd contortions your body can get itself into. The human body is a weird & beautiful thing.”



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James Moore Does It All

In today’s environment, it’s often hard to get noticed if you only do one thing. Even if you do it very well. It seems, sometimes, you just gotta do it all. NYC resident James Moore seems to have his fingers in almost every mode of expression imaginable. And he’s not afraid to get them dirty. Really nice to see a guy who’s bringing as much raditude to his graphic art as he is to mind-blowing sculpture and installation work. Moore is fresh off a great group show at Kunsthalle Galapagos in Brooklyn, and my eyes can’t get enough of his new work.

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Pepper Design A.K.A Andrea Berretta

Freelance illustrative designer Andrea Berretta has a great collection of posters and designs with creative hand drawn typography.

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Rachel Caldwell

Philadelphia illustrator Rachel Caldwell creates charming illustrations with a good sense of humor.

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Urban Explorer Matt Emmett Captures The Desolate Elegance Of Abandoned Places

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For the last three years, urban explorer and photographer Matt Emmett has taken pictures of hidden locations across Northern Europe. He finds it thrilling to enter a previously-forgotten world and discover its new idiosyncrasies firsthand. Emmett is particularly fascinated in industrial remnants and ex-military sites, and he’s documented it in a series titled Forgotten Heritage.

Having a camera with me allows me to prolong that thrill long after the building is gone,” Emmett writes on his website.“It’s an often quoted cliché but there really is a strong sense of palpable history present in abandoned buildings, the items left behind like paperwork in a drawer or plaques or signs in an industrial plant, allow you a glimpse into the past. I consider experiencing these places to be a great privilege.

The landscape images feature hulking machines now obsolete. Rust, dirt, and grime covers control panels and infrastructure as the earth reclaims the land. Emmett is interested in capturing the aesthetics, character, and history of the buildings. He describes this process:

From the point of view of a photographer there is a total lack of distraction in the stillness of a derelict building; the sound and movement associated with people or workers has been removed, for me this makes them far more sensory than when they are occupied. Your mind can easily focus on what is around you and takes in so much more. The building’s voice is clear and a character and visual aesthetic emerges that was much harder to define than if it was a busy, populated environment. (Via designboom)

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Vintage Portraiture Without An App

 Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography Kathryn Mayo Winter and Douglas Winter - Photography

Kathryn Mayo and Doug Winter, a husband and wife photography team based in Sacramento, collaborate with their models to create vintage portraits, seemingly of the past, using the traditional wet plate collodion process. This type of photography was born in the 1850s, but soon faded from the foreground, due to the proliferation of more practical, less time consuming processes involving dry gelatin emulsion.

However, in today’s fast-paced iPhone app culture, where formatting is clean, easy, and instantaneous, ironically, the slow painstaking process is exactly what this artistic pair prefer about collodion. Mayo elaborates, “Each image takes about 15-20 minutes to complete from focusing the camera, coating and sensitizing the plate, exposing, and processing. So, models need to have patience as not each image comes out perfect, and it takes a few to get one we like–sometimes, there are times when the chemistry isn’t working up to par and we don’t get anything at all.” Regardless of outcome, their passion is not just about product, but discovery and investigation. Mayo continues, “I love the idea of using a process steeped in history and with the ghosts of photographers who have come before me.  It is a process that is wholly addicting.”

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Nicholas Hanna’s Marvelous Bubble Machine Is A Work Of Wonder

Nicholas Hanna - Installation Nicholas Hanna - Installation Nicholas Hanna - Installation

At first glance, media artist Nicholas Hanna‘s installation looks like some kind of DIY gallows. It’s sparsely constructed: just wood and string set before a simple $20 table fan. Below the string, a tray filled with liquid soap — death by Mr. Clean, perhaps?

Then the machine kicks into gear, dipping the string into the soap, drawing it up slowly, and suddenly an iridescent bubble blooms out of nothing. Magic.

Hanna works seem to incorporate one part engineering and two parts childhood wonder. One of his other pieces is a Beijing tricycle that, as the rider pedals, uses water droplets to write Chinese calligraphy in Courier New. Another piece utilizes motion sensors to cause a cascade of light depending on how a candle flame is shielded by a hand. And another still is a long gunmetal trumpet mounted on a toy truck, labeled simply as “Fire Truck #1.” What does the fire truck do? It starts sounding the alarms at 7:30 p.m., of course.

The bubble machine — “Bubble Device #1,” naturally — is another one of these curiosities. It’s unusual to see beautiful bubbles created by something as sterile as Hanna’s spare framed machine, in an environment as austere as a plain white-walled room. But the wonder is still there.

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