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Katerina Plotnikova Photographs’ Show Intriguing And fantastical Connections Between Wild Animals And Humans

Katerina Plotnikova

Katerina Plotnikova

Katerina Plotnikova

Katerina Plotnikova

Russian photographer Katerina Plotnikova creates, what she calls ‘another tale about wonderland’. The various photographs bring forth a beautifully shot series that includes images of human/wild animal interactions and whimsical fashions.

Evoking a mythical, fairy-tale world, the images transport the viewer to a place outside of modern settings. The gentle and serene colored landscapes turn these images into something that, upon observation, takes the viewer to a world familiarized though childhood stories; the images can go both ways though;  it can remind them of the latter, or of a high-fashion, fantasy photo-shoot.

The subjects’ interaction with wild animals are what make these photographs more surreal than not; in one of the photographs we see an auburn-haired young woman hold out her hand to a grizzly bear, as though the majestic creature is asking her to dance. But, how can a a small figured girl be dancing around with a live, three-ton bear you ask?

Plotnikova was able to pull off these incredible shots with the help of two professional animal trainers.

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Faye Moorhouse’s Amusingly Weird Movie Poster Illustrations Are Better Than The Real Thing

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Faye Moorhouse is a Brighton-based freelance artist known for her raw and weird paintings. Messy lines, odd proportions, and smeared watercolors characterize her highly stylized work. Her subject matter is similarly strange — from violent animal attacks to eerie midnight gatherings to depressed-looking people loitering around rundown towns, everything she paints is a complex mix of childlike play and adult absurdity.

Featured here is Moorhouse’s new series called the Wonky Movie Poster Show, wherein she has illustrated twenty movie posters. As she wrote in an email to It’s Nice That last week, the paintings are intended to be “weird and ugly and hopefully funny” (Source). Her assessment is correct; the eros of the Nymphomania poster is reduced to a bedraggled woman who appears to be yawning, and the stately lion of The Lion King looks apathetically over the white void of his kingdom. By filtering these familiar images through her own bizarre lens, Moorhouse strips away the hype and seriousness surrounding these films and makes us laugh.

Moorhouse’s unique style has gotten her work recognized. In addition to her fun and bizarre self-initiated projects, her clients include The New York Times, Salt Hill Journal, and Epiphany Zine. Visit Moorhouse’s website, Instagram, and Twitter to follow her work. Prints, ceramics, and other goods can be purchased via her Etsy shop. (Via It’s Nice That)

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The Culture Of Thailand’s Ladyboys

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In Thailand, the term ladyboy is a nickname for transgender women, and they are a population often met with intolerance and prejudice. Their place in society is explored through photographer Soopakorn Srisakul’s series Mistress, in which he captures the daily life of his girlfriend and four other ladyboys. They all work at bars and as call girls in the infamous red-light Nana district in Bangkok.

Srisakul’s images are his journey in understanding his partner and the others experiences. There are few positions that are hiring transgendered women, so this community typically finds work in department stores, makeup counters, and cabaret venues. Those that are bargirls generally make better the better wages, which allows them to save up for gender reassignment surgeries.

Mistress presents us with poignant pictures of both work and home. There are moments of dark clubs, sure, but there are also quiet scenes in bright bedrooms. Srisakul writes:

They go out working, come back to their room, go relaxing outside, occasionally go back to visit family in the countryside, and then go to work. They, like anyone else, just try to get by. They laugh for joy, cry for sorrow, they work to earn a living, and they have an argument with their boyfriend, just like anyone else. In this sense, what makes them so different from us as to warrant a harsh treatment from the moral society, and do they deserve it at all? (Via Feature Shoot)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: LCD Soundsytem’s Party Robot

LCD Soundsystem reminds us that robots will one day take over the world. But don’t worry all the robots will want to do is party, dance, and make out. Phew! Crisis averted!

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Joe Kelly

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Joe Kelly is bringing some Rock n’ Roll with a Comic Book soul.  His work has a punk rock attitude served up in a crispy cutty illustration style.

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Lucas Simoes Cavernous Collaged Portraits

These cavernous collaged photographs by  Brazilian artists Lucas Simoes are the result of a series of interviews with his subjects. Read more about Lucas’ process after the jump.

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Lukasz Wierzbowski’s Playful Interactions

Lukasz Wierzbowski is a freelance photographer from Wroclaw, Poland. His photographs exude youthful energy and a sense of humor. With a keen eye for composition and a love for nature his work often features a figure playfully interacting with an environment. The result is a body of work that serves as pictorial allegories involving our relationship with the world around us.

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Judi Harvest Crafts Intricate And Delicate Glass Beehives

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Miami-born but aptly based in both New York City and Venice, artist Judi Harvest creates intricate and fanciful glass sculptures.   Ranging from gnarled bears to purple martians, her work varies in both subject matter and style. However, since 2013, Harvest has paid special attention to the natural realm, creating delicate and wispy glass beehives.

Comprised of Murano glass and wire, each hive sculpture is naturalistic in color and realistically rendered. Like the pieces themselves, the process behind the work is extremely intricate and requires a great deal of skill:

Each vessel begins with a hand-rolled cylinder of chicken wire, wire found in Venice and characterized by a finer module than that of the hive sculptures made in New York. Glass is blown into the cylinder, protrudes between the wires, and balloons delicately above the top. Some vessels retain wire embedded in their surfaces. Amber glass is the base color in which Harvest mixes gold or silver leaf and other additives that affect opacity, reflectivity, and hue. Sprinkling the hot surface with powdered glass pigment and reinserting the vessel into the furnace creates a rough yet dainty texture that resembles a dusting of pollen. (Denatured: Honeybees + Murano catalogue, Venice, 2013)

In addition to the exquisite aesthetic of the sculptures, a personal interest in honeybees also contributed to the creation of this series. On top of her artistic career, Harvest is a beekeeper, finding inspiration “in the form and behavior of the honeybee, the hexagonal wax cells of the honeycomb, and the rounded volume of hives in nature”—influences that are undeniably present in the ornate detail and beautiful composition present in her Bee Series. (Via Sweet Station)

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