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Michael Zimmerer’s Disappearing Horizon

Photographer Michael Zimmerer‘s series White Horizon captures a Midwest white-out.  Zimmerer’s stark images capture a landscape shortly after a snow storm in which the horizon seems to disappear.  Even the sun is lost in the sky.  The expansive fields of white are interrupted by the dark shapes of buffalo, river, rock, or trees.  A nearly abstract quality is lent to the photographs more often seen on the canvas.  However, the subject matter – the untouched snow, clear rivers, wild animals – also seems to emphasize the absence of the human hand and its loneliness.

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Made With Color Presents: Garrett Haye’s Odd Altars To Everything And Nothing

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Garrett Hayes sculpture

Beautiful/Decay has partnered with premiere website building platform Made With Color  to bring you some of the most exciting contemporary art work today. Made With Color allows you to build a website that is professional and easy to use with just a few clicks and no coding. It’s so easy, you can start a website and finish it in one afternoon. So if you’re thinking about a website redesign or building a new website, get started on your free trial today. This week we bring you the mixed media sculptures of LA artist Garrett Hayes.

No material is safe when it comes to the dynamic and inventive sculptures of Garrett Hayes. Trained originally as a ceramist, Hayes takes the technical know-how of the world of ceramics and combines it with both found and hand made objects to create shrine like sculptures that are full of disparate materials, surfaces, and textures. His work is a collage of the odd and the ordinary, becoming totemic shrines to anything and nothing in particular.

About his use of materials Hayes states:

These things have all become relics: remnants from time, nature and life, now united in sculpture.  They are collected specifically for my desire to see that artifact live on in the new context of my choosing.  I consider myself the savior of these things.  Without me, they would sit hidden on shelves, end up in the dump, rot away completely, or some other variation on the fate of discarded objects.  So, I collect; cut, burn, suspend, stain, paint, sand, wax and sometimes I do nothing.  I stack, attach, drape, stretch and alter.  I make the pieces that blend in and stick out.  Putting on display things that never were intended to be displayed the way they now exist. 

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Pamela Council’s Sculptures Made Of Fake Acrylic Nails

Pamela Council - Acrylic Nails, Paint Pamela Council - Acrylic Nails, Paint

Pamela Council - Acrylic Nails, Paint

Pamela Council - Acrylic Nails, Paint

New York-based artist and product developer Pamela Council creates sculptures using hundreds of fake acrylic nails. Putting together these tiny, mundane objects, she builds extraordinary busts, lanterns, and sculptures about Olympic athletes. Her socially-conscious work focuses on the deeper meaning of these objects. What kind of associations do we have with them? Council writes about her thought process, stating:

I take everyday objects and re-figure them as I consider their associations and power. The process begins with research and includes a dissection of the cultural implications of the product, from why it was created, to how and where it is made, sold, and used. This enables me to extricate the object from its commercial value and present it in sculpture. Through this process, the object becomes re-possessed.

Mass-produced objects that are used on the body interest me the most; recently, my focus has been almost exclusively on beauty products. As I continue to investigate these cultural artifacts, my goal is to create a new dialogue and awareness about the things that we collect, consume, and discard. Hopefully, it will encourage an analysis that eulogizes the significance of these objects even as it allows for a more critical view of their value. If it works, my art will serve as a proxy for the objects and psyches we decide we can live without.

Council created a sculpture titled, Flo Jo World Record Nails, which used 200 sets of the manicured nails that Florence Griffith-Joyner wore during the 1988 Olympics, when she set the 200 meter world record. Council painted each set and had them for sale. You too could harness the same power as Flo Jo – being young, extremely talented, all while remaining stylish.

You can visit Council’s Tumblr, Blaxidermy, for her photos, work in progress, and things she comes across in her day-to-day life.

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André Tempel

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André Tempel‘s alien sculptures look like they belong in the lair of an evil mastermind bent on destroying the planet. His works look like colorful WWII underwater mines, or rotors fitted with revolving saw blades. I feel like Frankenstein’s creature is about to emerge from this orange capsule.

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Lincoln Clarkes’ Female Heroin Addicts

female heroin addicts

female heroin addicts

female heroin addicts

female heroin addicts

Photographer Lincoln Clarkes examines the street corners of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside to expose moments in the lives of over 400 female heroin addicts over the course of five years.

It began when Clarkes took a photograph of his long-time friend, Leah, “shooting up” against the backdrop of a Calvin Klein billboard starring Kate Moss- and interesting juxtaposition indeed.

“Heroines” captures the bleak realities of female addicts within the city. Clarkes exposes the physical and emotional scars of women whom inhabited a space were death was always nearby. Although the images are disturbing in many levels, it is hard to ignore Clarkes’ attempt to make the women shine through a different kind of light, perhaps a positive one, where their vulnerability brings forth an unusual kind of beauty. The photos serves as a kind of a tableau vivant of unwitnessed experiences in the social history of the Vancouver city life. (via Huff Post Exposure)

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Emily-Jane Robinson

Emily-Jane Robinson’s photography portfolio is filled with interesting and well taken images documenting Emily’s life and friends. Some of the photos walk the thin line of looking like the standard “look what me and all my sexy drunk friends did last weekend” but there are a handful of very strong photographs that capture all the youthful energy of Emily’s life without the usual cliche trappings. I’ve selected 10 of my favorite photos from her  work below.

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Tania Dibbs’ Timeless Sculptures Of Barnacle Infested Waste

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Aspen Valley based multimedia artist Tania Dibbs has created an epic series of barnacle infested sculptures. Her work, generated with various materials such as resin, paint and found objects, acts as a timeless collection of discovered underwater treasures. The beauty of her pieces lay in the simultaneous precision and playfulness within the materiality. Each sculpture demands a second look, an investigation, a questioning of origin and time. Dibbs‘ work, which ranges well beyond sculpture, also touching media such as oil and encaustic, holds a constant theme of questioning nature and man’s relationship to it. With pieces such as her denatured alcohol containers, rusted waste cans, and bottles being infested by, if not entirely submerged, in tentacle-barnacle-algea reminiscent formations, she forces perspectives on how and why. Where it is the made man objects that take on the action of being disturbed and manipulated, it is, in fact, the object that does not belong. Dibbs transforms every day garbage into fragile and precious works of art, concurrently creating an environmental debate. Her work, she describes, portrays an “unstoppable nature, creeping along and encrusting and covering” (via Hi Fructose).

Tania Dibbs has a show coming up @ De RE Gallery in Los Angeles. 

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Jun Kitagawa’s Giant Zippers Open Up Large Public Spaces

Jun KitagawaJun KitagawaJun KitagawaJun Kitagawa

For the last few years, Japanese artist Jun Kitagawa has installed large zippers in public spaces. Sometimes they are painted on the wall, but more often and impressively, they are placed as sculptures in the middle of rooms and in public ponds. There, the ground looks as though it’s opening up and going to swallow you whole. Kitagawa has fashioned larger-than-life zippers, complete with his name on it (akin to the popular manufacturer YKK). Between the giant zipper’s teeth you can see what’s below, like wooden beams or most of the time, a dark void.

Kitagawa’s work plays into the wonder we have of what lies beneath the surface, and is a metaphor for making light of the unknown. The giant zipper reveals what can’t easily be seen, and what we often wish that we could. Even if the zipper is “open,” many times the artist fills it with nothing, saying that the truth or reality isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  (Via Colossal)

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