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Rebecca Reeve’s Photographs Of The Everglades Recall Holland Funerary Traditions

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In photographer Rebecca Reeve’s series Marjory’s World I, she captures Floridian landscapes that reference a late 19th century Holland tradition. The idyllic scenes depict the swampy Everglades of long grasses, lily pads, and a lot of standing water. Framing each image is a set of curtains that blow in the wind.  This is inspired by an old practice where during the wake of the deceased, it was customary to cover all of the mirrors, landscape paintings, and portraits in the home with clothes.  Doing so makes it easier for the soul to depart the body and subdues any temptations to stay in this world.

Marjory’s World I is Reeve’s own interpretation of this act. To her, the ritual was confirmation of the deep connections and experiences we have with the natural environment. It also gave her a way to contextualize her fleeting time spent in the Everglades; All of these images were produced during her Airie Artist in Residence Program. Since she couldn’t take with her when she leaves, this symbolic act made it easier to depart.

In addition to the personal connection the artist draws from the work, to us it recalls the distance that many of us have to this untouched landscape. As we continue to develop an increasingly urban existence, these thrift-store fabrics create a window to the unfamiliar. (Via Artsy Forager)

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The Vegetable Orchestra Carves Remarkable Instruments From Fresh Produce

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Imagine a recorder made of a hollowed-out carrot, a guitar carved from celery. Using knives and drilling machines, the one-of-a-kind Vegetable Orchestra constructs their instruments entirely from fresh and dried vegetables, mimicking the sounds of everything from bass drums to airy flutes. Because the Vienna-based band works with organic materials that perish or dry out after a single performance or recording session, they must continually create and reinvent the tools of the medium.

The group currently has thirteen members. Since its inception in 1998, The Vegetable Orchestra has been dedicated to incorporating the talents of musicians, visual artists, writers, and designers, all of whom have equal say and contribute to a unique multimedia experience. The aesthetic figures prominently into the work, and the rich colors of the fresh instruments is given much thought. With their unusual instruments, orchestra hopes to draw out and make visible the vitality and potential of the natural world.

The Vegetable Orchestra travels around the world, creating immersive artistic spaces; at concerts, they play music, screen video performances, and offer audience members a fresh bowl of tasty vegetable soup that they charmingly refer to as the edible “encore.” The orchestra’s sound is certainly unlike anything we have ever heard. Though many instruments—like the pepper horn and the pumpkin drum— nearly replicate the sounds of familiar instruments, others sound entirely foreign. Inspired by seemingly discordant styles like house music, dub, electronic, and free jazz, the orchestra draws inspiration from diverse sources, composing syncopated pieces that are both chaotic and restrained. (via Juxtapoz and Lost at E Minor)

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Robert Palacios

dale_la_manoThis past weekend I walked into Venice Beach’s Universal Art Gallery and found myself instantly captivated by the paintings of Robert Palacios, which are currently there on display. Robert is a Los Angeles native, and his work spans the mediums of paint, linocuts, paper mache and even avocado pits. His work is marked by vivid colors and everyday narratives, played out by some very unordinary, playful characters. Although not represented in the images here, Robert seems to take great care in selecting the frames for his paintings – thick, gold and gaudy – a choice I couldn’t  have imagined would work so well to complement and complete his paintings.

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Till Gerhard

Hamburg Germany based painter Till Gerhard’s images are psychedelic narratives with dark undertones filled with unsettling atmospheres.

“The scenes he chooses to memorialize—dimly felt moments from that tumultuous decade in 20th Century American history when counter-culture briefly flourished—are rendered with a discreet maleficence that belies their offbeat humor and whimsical color-scatterings. Thus, an otherwise banal preoccupation with “hippy bullshit” is transformed into effectual social commentary.”- David Marcus

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Tara Tucker’s Wild Animals

Tara Tucker’s meticulously rendered drawings portray bizarre yet realistic hybrid creatures from a future animal kingdom, free from the fetters of human intervention.

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Artist Creates Incredible Tools And Machines Powered With Your Mouth

Mouth Factory-5 Sequences from Cheng Guo on Vimeo.

London based artist  and designer Guo Cheng’s “Mouth Factory” is a series of functional machines specifically designed to be operated by the mouth of the user, Which includes Chewing drill, teeth lathe, tongue extruder, blowing rotomolding machine and vacuum form machines.

The project explores the capabilities and versatility of this wondrous organ and correlating facial expressions, re-contextualised within the realm of production. As a comment on human enhancement, the project aims to explore the aesthetic of production through a series of performative devices. By focusing on the mouth, the production devices acquire a fantastic quality that amplifies and render visible the reciprocal relationship and effects between our body and our tools. (via)

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Andrew Clark

Andrew Clark’s illustrations have a beautiful vintage feel to them. I’m not positive about this but I believe most are made with colored pencils which give them a slightly faded quality that is brilliant in a world of neon colors and digital pixels.

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Loris Cecchini’s Relief Sculptures Replicate Sound Waves

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Loris Cecchini explores the nature of structure. His amorphous forms resemble the most basic element of life which is a cell, and with that basic shape the artist comments on human experience. His interdisciplinary installations have appeared worldwide garnering him praise and interest. They have been called visual poetics because his work prefers to be seen and experienced opposed to talked about.

Some of Cecchini’s grander projects have included a series called Intro. Environments. In this work the artist created large, site specific installations with forms that look similar to broken tree branches, natural sponges and cell structures. He placed these organic items randomly throughout a space and attached them to electric power lines, on trees or connected to flying wires. The impression here is that life is all around us. Even if we cannot see it we should always be conscious that something is growing and living nearby.

Another piece called Extruding Bodies created wall relief structures studying sound waves. These visual vibrations appeared to be moving and in some cases ear forms could be seen within the structure. Putting the pieces directly in the wall allowed for an optical illusion to occur which turned cinematic. Since sound waves are invisible the attempt to give the viewer an idea what they might look like is the type of question Cecchini answers and why his work is significant.

The artist was recently commissioned to design a class one watch for Chaumet. Only 300 of the special edition were made and the exclusive jewelry company used one of his wall wave structures on its face covered partially in diamonds. (via fubiz.net)

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