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Documentary Watch: Charles Krafft’s Human Bone China

 

Seattle based Charles Krafft has spent decades creating gorgeous porcelain sculptures referencing everything from war to pop culture. In this short documentary hear Charles describe his inspirations, process, and his use of human bone china to memorialize friends.

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Lisa NIlsson’s Internal Body Landscapes Made out of Paper

Lisa Nilsson’s works renders the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross sections. Her materials are Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time.

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The Dark Yet Luminous World Of Lauren Fensterstock And Her Enthralling Garden Installations

Lauren Fensterstock- Installation

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Lauren Fensterstock- Installation

garden installation

Sculptor Lauren Fensterstock crafts dark, supernatural worlds of monochromatic nature scenes, often fashioned in all black, that contain a deep sense of tranquility and serenity. Completed with paper and Plexiglass, these intricate scenes show flowers, grass and ponds. With thousands of flowers and blades of grass, all carefully placed, the work is dense and lush, taking over the room it inhabits. Fensterstock’s work breathes life into the space. Showing a landscape that is distilled into a single color illuminates the beauty and the texture of each individual component. Fensterstock’s work was recently published in a beautiful, hardcover book titled Radical Sentimentalism, with analytical essays and an in-depth catalogue of her installation work.

The details of her work as written on a representative gallery’s site:

“Fensterstock’s. site-specific installation work and wall pieces depict nature by incorporating meticulously cut and curled paper, charcoal, and Plexiglass to create floral and garden scenes. Fensterstock’s work and practice references French and English garden design of the 1500s to 1700s, the 18th century practice of ‘quilling’—sculpting paper by wrapping around a quill—along with a nod to, and reflection upon, 20th century American earth art and the work of Robert Smithson.”(Excerpt from Source)

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Art Thoughtz: How To Be A Successful Artist

Who knew that all you had to do was be a white male to be a successful artist. I spent 7 years in art school for nothing! Join us next time when we go over how to be a famous black artist.

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BEST OF 2011: Christina Mrozik’s Animal Instincts

Michigan based artist Christina Mrozik’s sculptures and drawings focus on  stories of migration, self awareness, shelter, and mating.

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Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert, of Denmark, has a colorful, otherworldly way of photography. It took us a split-second (or more..) to determine if the models above were Christmas mannequins from the 60’s or something else, awesomely contemporary. Her very posed images make for conversation, speaking about youth, beauty, situations and to be human.

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Muppet Puppet Queen

I’m sorry to do this. But……puppets and Queen rule.

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Phillip K. Smith III Transforms Abandoned Cabin In The Desert Into A Reflective Beacon

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American artist Phillip K. Smith III found inspiration from the most basic of places in his recent project, Lucid Stead. Taking a small cabin which had been slowly eroded by the harsh environments of the Joshua Tree Desert for seventy years, Smith III modified the existing structure, adding mirrors between aged wood slats and changing LED panels to the door and window frames. By day, the desert scenery is reflected upon the modified mirrored slats, while the piece illuminates the desert landscape by night. The artist explains Lucid Stead,  “This project is about tapping into the desert, into the pace of change, and is about responding to the quiet of the place. And ultimately, in that quite, the project begins to unfold.” 

While the piece has a decidedly aesthetic-first quality, Smith explains that there are four ideas at play in Lucid Stead – “Light and Shadow” (the interaction with the sun, and changes in the reflections of its light), “Reflected Light” (within the mirrors, using the desert as a medium placed on the shack), “Projected Light” (the LED lights within the shack, pure color illuminating the cracks and openings of the structure), and “Change” (the shifting colors of the lights, which change so slowly as to be almost unnoticed). Smith III continues, “The project really is about slowing down…stopping and being quite so you can truly see and listen.” (via from89 and designboom, additional images via Kevin Smith, archinect)

 

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