Get Social:

Baptiste Debombourg

Baptiste Debombourg

Baptiste Debombourg’s unique approach to medium and spacial presentation includes spending 75 hours pushing staples into a wall to create a “wall painting”, and UV-glueing shards of glass around an urban bus stop, with intention to “provoke some emotion or empathy”. He turns the scenario of each of his installation/sculptures from violent destruction to that of aesthetic appreciation.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Maximo Riera Bold Chairs And Couches Made In The Shape Of Wild Animals

maximo riera - Design 5_565x376 maximo riera - Design 7_565x569 maximo riera - Design 9_565x372 maximo riera - Design 4_565x424

Bringing nature and humankind together is the purpose of artist Maximo Riera. The Spanish artist is making chairs from wild animals such as elephants, octopus, rhinos, hippos and whales. An homage to the extraordinary creatures we too often take for granted.

It takes the artist approximately 11 weeks to manufacture one piece. With an average of 480 hours spent on the entire process. The process is complex. First, the 3D modeling and then the production achieved with the help of about 30 engineers grouped from five different companies. The animal-shaped chairs are made out of high dense polyurethane and held by a metallic frame. One piece weighs 350lbs.

Maximo Riera is highlighting through the making of these chairs the importance of nature. It’s a subtle metaphor for anyone who wants to hear it, that animals are a innocent presence and that it is human kind’s role to find tame. Like children looking at toys, we are delighted by the idea of perhaps owning one these chairs, or at least try them out.
‘this collection gives us an option of admiring what nature is capable of; this is the main reason why from the beginning I wanted to be faithful to the animal’s physique. this series is an homage to these animals and the whole animal kingdom which inhabits our planet, as an attempt to reflect and capture the beauty of nature in each living thing.’
What about the real ones? The question underlined here is, how can we come closer to nature and respect and live with it? (via Design Boom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

James Ulmer’s Organic Flood of Humanity

Diggin’ on these illustrative ink and watercolor works by James Ulmer. His repetitious, almost vintage-looking characters roll on and on across the page in a flood of really earnest, straight-up human appeal.

According to the artist’s website, we can look forward to seeing his work in a group exhibition at Grass Hut in Portland very soon.

Currently Trending

Photographs Of Transitory Spaces

Leah Oates - Photography Leah Oates - Photography Leah Oates - Photography

Boston born and Brooklyn based, Leah Oates, examines how wires cross between elapsed worlds, over time, abstracting the most mundane views into beautifully muddled masses of illuminated energy.

Comparable to dust settling, each seemingly frenetic thread of line and light eventually condenses and glides into an artful circadian rhythm, conceptually, awaking a reaction or need to absorb the shock of our own projected velocities.

Of her work, Oates states, “Transitory spaces have a messy human energy that is always in the present yet constantly changing. I find them endlessly interesting, alive places where there is a great deal of beauty and fragility. They are temporary monuments to the ephemeral nature of existence.”

 

Currently Trending

Helle Mardahl

The_Maid-A4-585

Helle Mardahl holds nothing back in her work both in subject and materials. Her background in fashion is evident, but her collections are not made for any runway. Start with her show A Royal Orgy Of Consumption which was on display at WAS gallery in Copenhagen, August 2008. Keep exploring; there’s a world of  intricacies and complexities wanting to be seen.

Currently Trending

Andy Diaz Hope

SF super-artist and all-around cool dude, Andy Diaz Hope, just opened up his most recent endeavor, Infinite Immortal @ Catherine Clark Gallery. Here’s a look at some of the works…..

Currently Trending

Vintage Ceramics Cleverly Covered With Dozens Of Tiny Ants

laphilie4 laphilie2 laphilie3 laphilie9From far away, you might not realize what’s on these porcelain pieces by Evelyn Bracklow for LA philia. But, upon closer inspection, you’ll notice that there are tiny painted ants that look like they’re travelling across plates, cups, saucers, and more. The German artist has permanently implanted this pest onto the very places that we don’t want them to be.

Despite someone’s potential aversion to the ants, these pieces are clever, unique, and beautifully crafted. The playful works are handmade in her studio, signed, numbered, and fired between 160 and 180 degrees. Glossy, gold rimmed, and vintage, the addition of these critters marrs the glossy white porcelain. But, that seems to be the point. Bracklow wants them to be unusual and catch the eyes of passer by, and she certainly does it. While some designs only feature the ants, other pieces have food on the plate and the ants hovering around it. Sounds appetizing, huh?

The pieces featuring food are part of a partnership between Bracklow, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy.

Currently Trending

Jason Thielke’s Laser-Cut Figures Contain Dissecting Lines Like Blueprints Of The Body

Jason Thielke - Laser etch, acrylic, aerosol, ink on wood panelJason Thielke - Transfer and acrylic on wood panelJason Thielke - Undusted and sealed laser etch on panel

The dissecting cuts and lines shooting across the work of artist Jason Thielke create incredible images of figures full of expression. His incredible, illustrative art is made by laser cutting wood panels, with acrylic paint and ink to add color and highlight details. Many of his pieces have so many lines etched into the work; it is difficult to tell the negative space from the positive. Thielke makes great use of negative space in his etchings, forming intricate and dynamic shape and composition. Each figure contains so many marks streaking across their body, adding shapes and patterns that form constellations within them.

Thielke’s lines seem organic, swirling around the figures hair and face, forming expression. However, the etched lines are also highly geometric and architectural, building a blue print for the body. Such drastic, harsh angles create a dramatic atmosphere with striking faces filled with piercing eyes. These intersecting lines express,

“conflict between one’s ability to implement self control and compulsion to manipulate and constantly self-gratify.”

Thielke’s fragmented bodies cut through you with a powerful emotion as they keep pulling you deep under their spell, inviting you to examine every cut in the composition. The artist does not only uses the technique of laser etching to create his figures, but has also inked his cut wood panels like a woodblock and then used them to make prints. Thielke has exhibited all across the U.S. from Boston to San Francisco. His work can be found at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver, Colorado, where Thielke currently lives.

Currently Trending