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The Wayfarer’s Chapel

I will start this off by saying, I know it’s a bit cliche for a 25 year old woman to begin posting about wedding chapels on art blogs.  Regardless, I do have other things on the brain, like art!

Honestly, I feel like I never really appreciated the mighty, widely conferred “greatness” bestowed upon the behemoth architect Frank Lloyd Wright until seeing this 1948 Wayfarer’s Chapel. I know that’s like a musician “suddenly” getting the Beatles, but this is magestic and awe-inspiring! The setting itself looks like a wizard’s mighty abode; constructed entirely out of glass, towering redwoods act as the pilasters of the church itself. It’s like a living, breathing ancient relic from The Hobbit- can’t you just see the Elvin-Mortal weddings taking place here? Not to mention, it’s dedicated to Swedenborg,the mystic who wrote the canonical (later very influential on occultists, who blended the text with alchemy and divination) text “Heaven and Hell,” detailing all manner of demons and spirits that he purported to have witnessed himself. It’s quite a crystal ball, I feel the energy could channel some very supernatural thoughts indeed.

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Jennifer Celio’s Manipulated Landscapes

Jennifer Celio’s delicately rendered landscapes manipulate perception, creating fantastical iterations in which artificial and natural imagery fuse to become newly impossible sites. Working in graphite pencil on paper, she creates obsessively detailed scenes inspired by urban environment. Hinting at the contemporary threat of environmental degradation, Jennifer’s drawings depict seemingly mundane spaces that have been artificially altered or supercharged. The artificiality of our natural environment as well as our quest for it is questioned. See Jennifer’s work in person until April 21st in Los Angeles at Katherine Cone Gallery.

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Black Sheep: An unconventional look at good ol’ family values

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Black Sheep: An unconventional look at good ol’ family values is a compilation of  interesting photos and quotes from a plethora of underground icons… many of whom I grew up admiring, and some of whom I had never heard of (but was happy to be introduced to). Oh Did I mention I’m in it as well?

Essentially, Black Sheep is a collection of photographs, stories, and reflections on family from the perspective of individuals involved in underground scenes, aiming to challenge the presumption that people involved in subcultures—be it hardcore, punk, graffiti, skate, tattoo culture, or whatever else–come from unstable homes or have poor family values.

There are over 100 contributors: everyone from Darryl Jenifer of the Bad Brains to Melissa Auf der Maur of Hole; Ian MacKaye and Henry Rollins to brothers Dave One and A-Trak. In some cases I really felt like a peeping tom looking into a window at the lives of some of the icons who molded my youth. The book is about family values: how these people were shaped as kids, and what values they’d like to instill in their own children.

A big part of this book also seems to be helping people not familiar with underground scenes to break the negative stereotypes surrounding people who are in some way against the grain. Yes, you can be a tattooed hardcore frontman who takes his kids to the park every day and has Sunday brunch with his grandmother each week. This is really “The Osbournes” meets Chicken Soup for the Soul.

Not only is Black Sheep a great book but it was also compiled by Karyn Gray, one of my all time favorite B/D interns. Karyn moved to LA from Canada to work with us for a few months and it’s so great to see that she’s started a career in publishing. Congrats Karyn!

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Aaron Noble & Greg Lamarche @ Guerrero Gallery

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Tomorrow night Guerrero Gallery opens their 7th show with a solo presentation of long time BD favorite Aaron Noble, and a project space offering from  tinkerer of texts, Greg Lamarche. More images and proper info below.

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Mark McKeague – Twitter Radio


TwitterRadio from Mark McKeague on Vimeo.
 

I wish i had the knowledge to create something as beautiful as this. The project Mark created allows him to tune in to twitter posts in real-time using the analog radio. You can use the knob to scan “stations”, which are different twitter posts. Amazing, amazing, amazing.  He used an arduino board and lot of grey matter at SARc.

 

Also, here is an interesting programmatic response to Mark’s project which integrates twitter and youtube. TwiTV click on the top right black square to flip channels. Graphics are kinda shabby though.

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Video Watch: Ryan McGinness on Self-Promotion & the Future of the Gallery System

Check out this great interview with everyone’s favorite graphic designer turned artist Ryan McGinness discuss everything from his work process, the importance of art galleries, his disdain for social media, and all sorts of other things. Can’t say I agree with everything he says but it’s fascinating to hear his views on such a broad array of topics.

 

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Ramona Rosales’s Electric Photographs Of Women Below The Knees Explode With Color

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With her electric series Outside the Lines, photographer Ramona Rosales elevates the everyday to the realm of high drama by staging eye-catching moments saturated in color. Through the course this witty narrative, a woman, seen only below the knees, undergoes a series of domestic blunders that are both comical and tragic. Each photograph is shot after the fact, as if to chronicle not the accidents themselves but their psychical impact upon our protagonist and her home.

Through a masterful use of color, Rosales plays with our perception, imbuing each still image with a vibrating, buzzing afterglow. Opposite colors create a visual tension as a green wall is juxtaposed with magenta pumps, a blue curtain with orange stockings. At the same time, harmonizing colors seem pull across the frame toward one another.

The wonderfully hectic blocks of color allow the photographs to flatten into a more two-dimensional plane and veer into the aesthetic we normally associate with collage, recalling great works of mid-century pop art and advertising. Unlike those perfected— and sometimes ironical— works espousing the pleasures of modern home, Rosales’s endearing subject appears to inhabit an indoor landscape ripe with tension and anxiety.

For Rosales, color isn’t an objective means of triggering an optical response; instead, she hopes to tap into our subjective memories and associations. Some of the narratives are drawn from her own life experiences, remembered incidents from which she incorporates at least two colors. Both humorous and delightfully suspenseful, Outside the Lines invites us to perceive the dynamic vitality of even the most banal of life’s many moments. Outside the Lines opens July 10 and runs through August 24, 2014 at De Soto Gallery.

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Photographer Ahn Sun Mi Depicts Surrealist Metamorphic Emotions In Her Work

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Perhaps taking some influence from the Hindu god Shiva, Korean artist Ahn Sun Mi creates self portraits depicting herself as some type of all seeing entity. In a surreal sense the photographs Mi creates depict the many emotions and feelings one experiences throughout the day. It conveys the complexity of human behavior by showing multiple eyes or arms. These represent the many things we see and do throughout the course of our lives. The numerous changes we undergo each day become in Mi’s work another mark in our psyche which is visually or literally depicted in her work.
While studying in Paris Mi became interested in the concept of metamorphosis which resulted from her being away from home in a strange land. Some of her photographs resemble a moth about to turn into a butterfly. Others have her struggling out of a cocoon like a covering made out of her arms. It helped her deal with all the emotions which stemmed from her new surroundings and mirrored how growth is good even though somewhat painful. By using herself in the photos we not only experience the ideas she’s trying to communicate but also get to see the biographical side in a literal visual sense. Historically Mi’s work finds reference to artists such as Yayoi  Kusama and Rene Magritte. (Via faithistorment)

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