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Nate Page

Nate Page

I’m loving these carved magazines by artist Nate Page . Page uses methods of drawing and assemblage to create these paper landscapes. It’s such a simple and powerful idea! I’m a big fan of this series, but some here at Beautiful/Decay think it looks like “bad sand art…” but I’d have to disagree, at the very least it’s ‘cool’ sand art.

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Ed Fairburn Draws Delicately Detailed Portraits On Vintage Maps And Star Charts

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Artist Ed Fairburn is using maps and star charts as a base to draw detailed portraits. Inlaid in the weave of the roads, signs and lines, the faces appear textured and emotional.

Ed Fairburn draws dashes or fills up a specific area on the map. Playing with the existing colors symbolizing lands, water or housings. It takes him a couple of days to a month to complete a drawing. The artist draws on vintage road maps looking forward to discovering uncommon names or places he once visited in the past. The star charts drawings confer a different atmosphere, a poetic mood to the faces trapped in the constellation. He chooses his ‘canvas’ himself. The patterns and orientations are key for him to start drawing. In terms of details, lines, names printed on the maps; the more cluttered, the better outcome. 

The more contrast exists between the lines, shapes and shadows on the portraits, the more depth it creates on the overall drawing. Not two inches are ever the same, and yet the accumulation of dashes and small lines create a pattern inherent to a part of the face. For either the road or star maps; the association of a land, a space with a human face resonates with evasion and travel. The possibility for the viewer to escape from reality and dive into a foreign land, a dream destination. ( via Booooooom)

Ed Fariburn’s drawings will be displayed at the Mike Wright Gallery in Denver, Colorado until December 19th 2015.

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Dr. Seuss’s “Unorthodox Taxidermy” Brings Magical Creatures To Life

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In the late 1930s, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) brought his imaginary creatures to life, sculpting them out of wood, mounting them on the wall, and imbuing them with a haunting realism by incorporating real animal parts. The remains of deceased animals came from his father’s workplace, the Forest Park Zoo.

After their construction, the creatures, bearing delightful names like the “Andulovian Grackler” and the “Two Horned Drouberhannis,” were sold as a collection under the title “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy.” After living in a child’s bedroom, the pieces were retired to an old barn and resold in 2004. The Chase Group later made resin copies of many of the works. Some of these pieces are available for sale on eBay.

Each sculpture stays true to Seuss’s touchingly earnest connection with the imaginative realm of childhood. The animals, though mounted on a wall, maintain a poignant emotive ability; the marriage of raised brows and mellow smiles with the antlers of genuine beasts makes the works magically vital, communicative— and somehow— real.

The profound soulfulness of the work is only enhanced by its hints of morbidity. In what is perhaps a critique of taxidermy practices, the prolific artist chose to present these fantastical creatures within the context of human domination, forcing viewers to reconcile our desire to believe in magic with the knowledge of environmental destruction. In this way, the aging of the works has not detracted from their potency but has serendipitously heightened it; years after the prolific author’s death, we are asked to search these faded faces for indicators of bestial personalities and traces of the beloved artist’s hand. Take a look. (via This is Colossal and the world’s best ever)

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Anti-Graffiti Work Crew Got Collaged In The Street Art He Wanted To Erase

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Combo is protective if his street art. In response to an anti-graffiti brigade repainting one of his piece, the artist took a picture of this man and turned him into a collage a few days later. The part the man was covering was the tagged area and the part representing Donald Duck’s nephews Huey, Louie, and Dewey was left undamaged. 

Based in Paris, France; Combo depicts mischievous and entertaining street art. He feeds his obsession with interaction by opening a conversation with the walkers and his followers. He usually starts out by tagging the beginning of a sentence and seeking the end on his Facebook page. He asks his fans to finish it. The ending that has the most likes gets to be tagged.

The artist focuses on diverting visual images from their original meaning by adding foreign elements. These elements are usually familiar, coming straight from pop culture, cartoons and video games. By using popular symbols he speaks to the mass and can therefore vehicle his messages. Most of the time the topics covered are injustices within our society. Combo engages with its viewer in a disruptive manner but he always makes sure he does not cross the line of judgment. (via Lost At E Minor).

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Karen Knorr’s Photographs of Sacred Indian Interiors Consider Caste, Femininity, And it’s Relationship To The Animal World

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen knorr india song

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the “other” through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men’s space (mardana) and women’s space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography. Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century. (via)

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Jana Maré in Ruins of a Home

The new work from Australian photographer Jana Maré in a way presents different relationships.   Maré’s nude body is found throughout a deteriorating house, interacting with various rooms and structures.  The physical relationship expressed in the photos at once recalls the structure’s past incarnation as a home and emphasizes its current dilapidation.  At the same time, though, Maré, in using her own body and refusing to use digital manipulation seems to have a nearly uneasy relationship with the camera and viewer – her posing a kind of performance that has been frozen.

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Dina Goldstein’s “Gods of Suburbia” Places Religious Figures Among Modern Society

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Last Supper

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Photographer and pop surrealist Dina Goldstein’s large-scale project titled Gods of Suburbia features a collection of deities and religious figures set within the context of modernity. Buddha, Mohammed, Satan, and others exist alongside technology, science, and secularism as it relates to living in the (anywhere) suburbs. Goldstein explains:

The series plays with narrative and religious iconography in order to communicate how organized belief has become twisted within a global framework driven by consumerism and greed.  The project challenges the viewer — religious or secular — to embark on a journey of self-reflection as they contemplate the relevance of dogma in modernity.

Goldstein’s moody images highlight some less-than-stellar facets of our modern culture. Lack of compassion, unwillingness to learn/accept other beliefs, and bullying are just some of the themes that the photographer touches on. The series, while strange, is poignant and relatable as we read more and more bad news everyday.

Each photo in Gods of Suburbia features thoughtful and interesting explanations of how every figure relates to contemporary society. Read it on Goldstein’s website.

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Design Watch: Moustache

The French really do design the heck out of home goods! Moustache is another French design firm designing some of the most exciting new chairs and home items around. And like any new artist they reference the important works that came before them enough to seem familiar, while adding their own touch to make it feel brand new. And using a Versaille’s-like setting for their campaign? Pretty brilliant.

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