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Awesome Video Of The Day: Flux

Not much to it. Just amazing eye candy for 4.40 minutes.

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Diary of a Madman: Part 4

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Kyle Thomas is still crankin’ out covers for our new book, check out some of the more newer ones after the jump. I’m sure we’ll have a trash can full of dried up Sharpies by the end of this…

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Julian Schnabel, Judy Chicago And Other Artists Who Use Dinnerware As Art

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party

Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel

Molly Hatch

Molly Hatch

Drawn to the material for aesthetic or symbolic reasons, many artists have incorporated glass or dinnerware into their work.  Julian Schnabel is probably the most prominent artist who has incorporated dinnerware into his practice.  He created his famous “plate paintings” in the 1970s/80s and they became some of his best-known work.  Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party is another famous instance, but with a feminist theme.  Chicago depicted place settings for 39 mythical and historical well-known women.  Each setting features symbols relating to a specific woman’s accomplishments.  Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he uses to make museological displays depicting one’s attempts to learn about historical peoples from their household possessions and objects.  Molly Hatch is an artist and designer who grew up on a dairy farm in Vermont.  She studied ceramics alongside painting, drawing and printmaking and incorporates all of them into her work.  Jason Kraus uses glasses and flatware to generate reiterations of the same setup.  For instance, for his installation at Redling Fine Art Kraus served a nearly identical meal for the first seven nights of his exhibition.  After the meal he would clean the dishes and stack them inside a plywood cabinet, creating remnants of an ephemeral performance. Esther Horchner is an illustrator whose clever teacups depict bathing figures.  Cheryl Pope incorporates dinnerware and other objects in unexpected ways.  Her Balancing Stacks, for instance, was a performance where a woman stacked dishes on a precariously balanced table.  Like the feminization of a ritual like clearing or setting the table, Pope uses her stacks as a symbol for something destined to collapse.

Each of these artists finds symbolic or artistic value in the typically utilitarian objects.  Using these almost universally recognizable items for art and performance enables a kind of storytelling or metaphor that is unique to each artist.

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Amazing Hallucinogenic Drawings Made Intricately With Color Pens



It may be an understatement to say that the artist that simply goes by the name of Mossi is interested in lines and line-making.  His drawings are incredibly intricate, containing innumerable lines.  Mossi uses typical color pens to create his a typical work.  Each piece is a sort of portrait.  However, more than faces, the drawings are just as much investigations of lines, pattern, and facial composition.  The portraits are meditative, perhaps as much for the viewer as they were in creating for the artist.  The bright colors, and extremely detailed pattern make for psychedelic-like work that’s easy to get lost in.

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!ND!V!DUALS’ Playful And Larger Than Life Scrap Wood Sculptures

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Using salvaged materials Boston based artist collective !ND!V!DUALS  create sculptural installations occupied by large-scale or life-size characters and creatures that are influenced by 1990’s cartoons, animations, and film set designs. Creatures and anthropomorphic beasts have been the focus of work as well as an interest in creating environments and transformative art experiences. The narratives are fairly open, but encourage viewers to be transported into the world of there humorous and playful sculptures. (via)

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Unbelievably Realistic ‘Painted’ Fish By Keng Lye

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Keng Lye painting5

It may surprise you to know that these are not real animals – they’re probably most accurately called paintings.  Artist Keng Lye brings these aquatic creatures to life by creating layers of resin and alternating them with acrylic paint.  Coupled with his expert play of perspective, the fish (and other creatures) seem ultra realistic.  Keng Lye has since added three dimensional portions to his ‘paintings’ as can be seen in these first four images, making them seem even more unbelievably alive and real.   [via]

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Ángela Burón Creates Optically Perplexing Photographs Of Distorted Bodies

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Using herself as a model, Spanish photographer Ángela Burón creates surreal and often optically perplexing photographs. With askew imagery and mysterious compositions, Burón seeks to disorient the viewer and prompts them to question the reality of what they are seeing.

While Burón boasts a diverse body of work, a common motif in her photographs is a focus on hybridity. Feet replaced by hands, breasts conjoined with thighs, and legs sporting two sets of knees are just a few examples of these peculiar pieces, which make up a large portion of her celebrated portfolio.

In addition to her surreal photographs, Burón also dabbles in more conventional portraiture. Spanning coy self-portraits, sensual nudes, shots of amorous couples, and even a close-up of a bright-eyed cat, these works—though seemingly realistic—still convey the artist’s unique and curious style. Characterized by unnatural poses and disconcerting expressions, this side of Burón’s oeuvre still captures her inherent tendency toward the surreal and, thus, portrays her unique and unusual style. (Via Inkult)

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Madrid’s Op-Art Christmas Lights

We all love the lights that pop up during the holiday season. Most of the time individuals and local city planners hang the standard lights that we’ve come accustom to or the occasional Santa Silhouette climbing down a chimney. However this holiday season the good folks of Madrids’ Barrio De Salamanca had the smarts to hire Architect Teresa Sapey to push the envelope of cheerful holiday lights. Instead of using the traditional holiday symbols that we’re used to seeing Sapey designed a series of concentric circles that overlap creating the trippiest holiday light display you’ve ever seen. The patterns overlap and become more intense the further you are with colors, patterns and shapes overlapping one another to create a spectacular and optically dazzling new take on a tradition that has been taking place for many decades. Happy holidays to all indeed! (via)

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