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The Warm And Quirky Narrative Sculptures of Matt Jacobs

Matt Jacobs is an artist living and working in Kansas City, Missouri. The thing that I really enjoy about his work is his sense of play that comes through not only in the titles but the actual materials used to create his pieces such as inflatable toys, tic tacs, buckets, and brightly colored enamels.  In many pieces Jacobs uses juxtaposing materials almost as a means to test the limits of the materials itself.  An example of this is in his “Don’t Worry. I Won’t Hurt You. I Only Want You to Have Some Fun” in which he balanced cinder blocks 9 feet high and stuffed pool toys through the openings implying gregarious ornamental decoration of a fun day at the pool. Jacobs is the master of balancing objects by shape, form, and color. He has a great archive of studio photos on his website which is worth a look through, as well as his past installations and drawings.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Strawberry Swing

Not sure how old this is but it’s still a good one. This is an alternative video for Coldplay’s Strawberry Swing, directed by Ross Neil and Matt Clark, with thanks to HSI London.

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Future Perfect- Get Featured In The Next Issue Of Beautiful/Decay!

CREATE YOUR VISION FOR A BETTER TOMORROW AND GET FEATURED IN BEAUTIFUL/DECAY BOOK 6


We want to see the world you want to live in, your Future Perfect. Submit your work of art based on the Future Perfect theme; you are free to use any medium and interpret the theme as you see fit. On March 15th we will pick one lucky person from the submissions who will get a package of Beautiful/Decay goods valued at $300 and a 10-15 page interview in Beautiful/Decay book 6! Up to 70 additional future perfect submissions will also be selected and published.

Share your vision, plan a better tomorrow and join Beautiful/Decay to create a Future Perfect.

Visit The Future Perfect Site for more info

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Richard Sweeney’s Intricate Paper Sculptures Are Incredibly Made Without Glue

Richard Sweeney - paper sculptureRichard Sweeney - paper sculptureRichard Sweeney - paper sculpture  Richard Sweeney - paper sculpture

Looking like a set of architecture models for a Gaudi building, Richard Sweeney‘s paper sculptures are organic, poetic, intricate, and mostly made without the aid of glue or tape. Taking his inspiration from the shapes and forms that occur in nature – like clouds, mounds of snow, he folds paper into beautiful geometric pieces. Not confined to working on a small scale, Sweeney also constructs wonderfully complex forms that hang from the ceiling to the floor.

He was recently part of a show called Above The Fold, and is a part of a group of talented modern day origami masters. Taking the ancient art of paper folding to a new level, Sweeney and his contemporaries are redefining the limits of what can be done with paper. Biological structures, and the essence of form and function are Sweeney’s inspirations. He talks to Design Museum more about what motivates and inspires him:

As I have mentioned, architecture is a great inspiration to me, but aside from the man-made, I am also inspired by natural forms. It is not so much the organic shapes, but the means by which they are generated that interests me. It makes great sense to borrow from elements from biological structures, as these forms demonstrate the pinnacle of material, structural and functional efficiency. (Source)

Like a true designer, Sweeney is giving the humble piece of paper new life and function. You can even attempt his paper folding technique at home by watching this short tutorial here. (Via Exhibition-ism)

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Pauline Hisbacq’s This Side Of Paradise

Pauline Hisbacq’s This Side Of Paradise documents Rallyes, parties for teenagers from upper-class in France where well dressed young people dance, drink, and try to seduce one another in a world where they are free to be young and live a careless existence.

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Hundreds Of Copies Of The Wizard Of Oz Create Hypnotic Waves Of Color

Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube

The Wizard of Oz experiment from Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube on Vimeo.

When creating his reinterpretations of Technicolor masterpiece The Wizard Of Oz, German artist Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube didn’t limit himself to a singular medium. Dabbling in video manipulation, installation and printed ephemera, his “experiment” exists as a deep dive into what happens when the artist points the focus away from narrative, and instead zeroes in on visual velocity. He chooses to takes a step back, and re-imagines the film as a series of frames—laid side-by-side in a technique he refers to as “stilling film.”

In this 2-minute preview of Neuschaefer-Rube’s video piece, you can see hundreds of copies of the film, playing simultaneously in a hypnotic wave of color fluctuation. In the exhibited form, this work is accompanied by a printed version of the investigation, a singular film still, and a large (somewhat ominous) black box designed for viewing. Neuschaefer-Rube’s ability to steer the viewer’s attention from piece to piece is masterful, with each element of the experiment hitting just the right notes—perhaps making a slight nod to the Great and Powerful himself.

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Stephen Cheetham’s Iconic Laugh

This  Stephen Cheetham character sure knows how to pack a lot of laughs into his illustrations. Nothing says cancer like a a lung with a dozen hands and a butt head!

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Masha Rumyantseva

A nice selection of collages from russian illustrator Masha Rumyantseva that will simultaneously take you back in time and bring you to a new future.

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