Get Social:

Placer Deshacer


Not really sure what Placer Deshacer (it seems they are a musical group with an alter-presence) is about but these pictures remind me of educational videos from the 70s and 80s, or the vague way that conceptual art is photographed. I love how the absence of color makes the human body look so mysterious and full of knowledge…

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy’s Haunting Photoseries Erases Buildings, Leaving Only Their Facades

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

tumblr_n28eh8hi8E1qbkx0lo2_500

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy is a French photographer whose Facades series is a personal exercise in land and city-scape photography, with one major difference. In each photo, the Lyon-based Gaudrillot-Roy digitally edits each image so that building itself is erased, leaving only the structure’s front, or facade, present. Now on his third iteration of the series, each village or city building carries ominous, almost surreal connotations of civilizations being abandoned, wrecked by recession, or left to slowly disintegrate. However, the images retain a still, quiet beauty, and are haunting in their simplicity.

Says the photographer, “The façade is the first thing we see, it’s the surface of a building. It can be impressive, superficial or safe. Just like during a wandering through a foreign city, I walk through the streets with these questions: what will happen if we stick to that first vision? If the daily life of “The Other” was only a scenery? This series thus offers a vision of an unknown world that would only be a picture, without intimate space, with looks as the only refuge.” (via skumar’s)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Dongwook Lee’s New Human Species

The human figure is at the forefront of the research and production of the young Korean artist Dongwook Lee. His remodelling of the body is an obsession that had led him over the last few years to breathe life into a new human species, an army of figures characterised by two leitmotifs: Dongwook’s man is always to be found naked and in miniature. On one hand, working on a microscopic level links him up to a long tradition of interest in the skilful rendering of minute details in a small-scale reality; on the other, it reflects a desire to cover up, camouflage or conceal these “figurines” in the backwaters of the most banal normality to which they might instinctively belong. One pokes his head out from the shell of a snail; another cries out desperately from behind a dry twig like a malignant wood spirit; yet another is to be found squashed inside a syringe, as if ready to be injected to another body along with all his dramatic charge. Their nudity seems to reflect the will to do away with the mystification of the human body, to show it without frills, without any indication of social status. It is here that Dongwook would appear to denote a break with the cultural traditions of his origins.

Currently Trending

Lara Schnitger at Modern Art

lara.schnicter.shave.5.15.10-012470_cropped

Lara Schnitger’s show, Damned Woman, at Modern Art in London (July 9th to August 7th) seems to hail from another time has it explores the idea of women from every angle. Schnitger uses methods and media associated with the domestic realm–textiles and stitching–to further explore the female role.

Currently Trending

Studio Visit: Marci Washington’s Paintings Tell Gothic-Romantic Tales

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Marci Washington. See the full studio visit and interview with Marci and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

We visited Marci in her backyard studio in Berkeley. It sits just behind her home, a kind of garage/storage space that got converted into a cottage. It’s comfortable and functional, with an open feel to it. Marci is full of gusto— she talks with her hands, takes on all kinds of facial expressions, and she’s funny as hell. She enthusiastically moved through our conversations, at turns awkward and eloquent, but always unguarded and real. We talked about a lot of things, but her affinity for the landscape of the English moorlands, particularly within the context of Romantic Literature, really struck me. Those rolling, uncultivated hills covered in low-growing grass, shrouded under heavy fog and moody skies have wholly captured Marci’s imagination. And it makes sense that they have— much of what interests Marci is mirrored in that rugged, desolate scenery. In various Romantic and Gothic works of literature, the moorlands often represent mystery, mysticism, liberation, turmoil, and passion; they frequently echo the psychological state of the characters, and reveal their greatest desires and fears. Marci’s current work references not just the physical landscape of the moors, but also speaks to themes found in a lot of this kind of literature, and the universal emotions that are evoked—all those feelings and ideas that run wild with mystery, awe, darkness, terror and beauty. I think Marci is after a particular kind of mood that toes the line between terrifying and thrilling, creating a response that’s simultaneously overwhelming and invigorating. All of this plays into her sensibilities as an artist, but also as a person: her love of Edward Gorey and his eerie illustrated books, her unflinching need to feel everything very deeply, her leanings towards the bizarre and unique, and her fondness for the not-entirely-explained. It’s pretty damn amazing that come November Marci will be showing work in England, not far from the wild and lonely moors that have taken up so much of her imagination.

Currently Trending

Jake Watling

jake Watling paintings

Oakland based painter Jake Watling creates paintings that are both festive and frightening at the same time. For some reason they remind me of a circus gone mad!

Currently Trending

Dynamic works Of Kinetic Art

Anthony Howe kinetic art

Anthony Howe

Laurent Debraux  kinetic art

Laurent Debraux

kinetic-2

Bob Potts

Benjamin Muzzin

Benjamin Muzzin

Kinetic art features movement that is dependent on motion for its effect.  It comes in multiple mediums including mobiles, machines and virtual movement or canvases that extend the viewer’s perspective.  Wind, a motor or the viewer generally drive moving parts or dynamic perception.

Kinetic Art has origins dating back to the late 1800s where Impressionist artists such as Claude Monet, Edgar Degas and Edouard Manet were the first to experiment with emphasizing the movement of the human figure on canvas.  In the early to mid 1900s artists began to create mobiles and other new forms of variable sculpture.  Individuals such as Max Bill, Alexander Rodchenko and Alexander Calder solidified and defined the style.

Today artists all over the world create kinetic art and sculpture.  Latin American artists Jesus Rafael Soto and Luis Tomasello both explore illusion, space and perception.  French artist Laurent Debraux experiments with magnets, metallic objects and other elements to create works dealing with surreal imagery.  South Korean artist U-Ram Choe likes to make kinetic works that mimic forms and motions found in nature.  Bob Potts creates sculptures that gracefully recreate the movement of flight or boats.  Anthony Howe employs wind to bring life to his massive sculptures.

Whether independently mobile, or reliant on a viewer’s perception to create an optical illusion, each of these artists and their works are inspired by a unique fascination with perception, movement and dynamism.

Currently Trending

Jorge Mascarenhas’s Dream World

Jorge Mascarenhas’s illustrations mix fluid brushwork and epic dreamlike narratives.

Currently Trending