Get Social:

Cara DeAngelis Paints Roadkill in Satirical 17th Century Still Lifes

 

Cara DeAngelis paints found roadkill in “compositions that both pay homage to, and satirize 17th century Hunting Still Lifes”. “The still lifes and portraits of animals on aristocratic laps explore the long-standing confrontations between the domestic and the wild.” But DeAngelis’ black magic goes a little further than that. The artist, who takes care to incorporate the “Tragic and the Infantile” within her work, includes children’s toys and dolls in her compositions to create an “absurd union“- nostalgia vs. violent death, innocence vs. murder. These paintings are done in oil, which somehow seems appropriate for the heavy concept scale within DeAngelis’ work. Ms. DeAngelis received her MFA from the New York Academy of Art in 2011.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Elisa Insua Depicts Pop Culture Out Of Cheap Toys

pop culturepop culture

pop culture

elisa44

elisa3

Using toys, computer hardware, beading, and even money, Argentinian-based artist Elisa Insua assembles images of popular culture with the items that make up popular culture. The intricate works take similar textures, colors, and shapes to form iconic portraits of Darth Vader, a Playstation controller, and the lion from the 20th Century Fox logo. Sometimes, Insua also covers three dimensional objects, like Maneki-neko (fortune cat) and toy guns and dinosaurs.

Erika Rae on Core77 described these works as appealing to someone who used to thumb through the I Spy series, a set of books where the reader would find a specific object among many, many others to solve a puzzle or riddle. Looking at Insua’s works, this description feels very appropriate. The mosaic of bright and cheery objects is alluring to our eyes, and focusing on the innocence of all of the toys in every image is almost escapist. For a period of time, we can slowly look over every part of Insua’s and be mesmerized by past popular culture. (via Core77)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

RIP Nujabes

Musician Jun Seba, also known as Nujabes passed away late last month after a fatal car crash at age 36. Why it took almost a month later for everyone to catch wind of it, I’m not sure but, pest in peace. You were so young and so amazingly talented. This video above was circulating the web for a bit- “Luv (sic) pt. 2” Nujabes featuring Shing02 and directed by Sou Ootsuki. Doesn’t watching it makes you feel alive? In a really breathtakingly normal way?

Currently Trending

Craig Ward Typography

craigward1I am by no means a typography or design buff. I have heard at length discussions on Helvetica and whatnot- don’t ask me, I definitely used Comic Sans back in highschool to make my Pug Fans of the World website. Lol. Maybe I wasn’t that bad. Anyways, while perusing one of my favorite websites, FairSpot (an amazing directory for new creative talent) I came across Craig Ward. I really liked some of his takes on typography- like above, a weird silly string metal record looking layout that seems to vibrate. More creative solutions below. 

 

Currently Trending

Austin Lee Strips Away And Finds The Core Of His Subjects

austin lee paintingaustin lee paintingaustin lee paintingaustin lee painting

A portrait tries to capture the essence of a subject. By honing in on a solitary figure usually from the chest up, we’re able to delve into the eyes and see beneath the surface. There’s some seriousness involved because the traditional portrait is used to capture a visual record which can act as a long standing account of that subject. Taking this and flipping it, painter Austin Lee creates cartoon-like portraits of re-imagined people and animals. Bursting with neon color and loose line, his subjects have nothing to hide and let it all hang out. His work associates with characterture and gestural expression mostly ending up as vignette laden pictures.

With titles like Dunno, Mr. Worry, Facepalm, and Taboo the idea of community and friends surface as the subject for many of his pictures. In one, two figures appear in the front windshield of a car, the anticipation in their faces is that of a destination thay are unfamiliar with. In another, “Crush” a Mona Lisa type portrait peers out from a cabinet frame portraying someone the artist has a crush on?

Using a similar approach Lee creates heads out of 3D prints and acrylic paint. These look like self-portraits and capture certain aspects of his personality with the least amount of rendering.  To some degree both his painting and prints reference minimalism in their quest to strip away and find the core of its subject.

Currently Trending

Chiharu Shiota

Chiharu Shiota, Installation

Chiharu Shiota‘s installations have the power to generate a surreal and almost dreamlike environment. Using a combination of items, the artist has created works that range from floating beds and a window tower to objects prisoners in a nest of thread.

Currently Trending

Raw, Emotional Photographs Of Shelter Dogs Are Unlike Any You’ve Ever Seen

rescue-me-8-650x433rescue-me-3-650x974rescue-me-4-650x974rescue-me-9

Recently, we have featured the work of artists like Douglas Sonders and Fred Levy, who photograph dogs as a means of advocating for the voiceless and promoting awareness about animal rescue. With the “Rescue Me” project, the photographer Brian Moss occupies a unique space in this dialogue; in contrast with the polished, slightly commercial aesthetic of other animal portraits, his photographs of shelter dogs are emotionally raw and candid, delving more deeply into the psychology of his canine subjects.

Moss’s photographic setting is the Bergen County Protect & Rescue Foundation shelter, where he arranges a poignantly modest and “tiny ‘studio tableaux’ […] in between a sink and a leaky washing machine.” Shot under a relatively shallow depth of field, this magical little corner becomes all the more intimate; as well-worn towels and tender, raggedy blankets blur into the distance, the dog subject is fixed with stunning sharpness, revealing the touching imperfections of the face: eye gunk, snouts rubbed raw, noses flushed with pink.

Moss’s project was born from necessity; he felt for the animals left homeless, and yet it was too painful for him to volunteer at a kill shelter. This shoot, which takes place at a no-kill facility, is his tribute to the creatures he longs to help. The honest gaze of the artist’s images are reminiscent of his earlier project with body builders; here too, he seeks out a genuine connection with his subjects. The dogs aren’t posed to appease to viewer or to elicit less emotion, but instead they are free to express their inner fears with darting eyes, unsteady legs, and perked ears. Rich with empathy, Moss’s lens offers rare and invaluable insight into the hearts of our fellow creatures. Take a look. (via Lost at E Minor)

Currently Trending