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Dual Personalities Are Explored In Ismael Moumin’s Haunting Split Screen Photography

Ismael Moumin  photographyIsmael Moumin  photographyIsmael Moumin  photographyIsmael Moumin  photography

 According to photographer Ismael Moumin everyone has two sides to their personality. In his cleverly crafted collaged pictures he renders a kind of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde narrative. In portrait style pics he explores dual sensibilities.  Some are traditionally made with happy/angry faces while others are left more open to interpretation. The flawless models are aesthetically pleasing to view and in some Moumin cuts parts of their faces to fit perfectly into another, thus making comment about the interchangeable definition of beauty. In one an Asian model is split with a Caucasian lady. Again a subtle reference to what appears on the outside might not necessarily coincide with what is on the inside. Then there are some where he erases the face altogether except for the silhouette and fills it with cosmic looking substances. These become scientific planetary like images which recall mood rings and heat sensitive substances which change at the touch.

Moumin makes his living as a professional photographer. He has done shoots for Rue Blanche, Cacharel, Sage, LESinrocks and Hero Magazine. He is represented by Frenzy Picture in Paris.(via Ineedaguide)

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You Still Have Time For Last Minute Holiday Shopping!

Nothing says happy holidays like something Beautiful that has just the right amount of Decay. Use code: SECRETSHIP to get your entire order shipped for free!  So click the shop button above, support The Cult Of Decay, and get your shopping fix all in one spot!

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Jonathan Bergeron AKA Johnny Crap

Canadian illustrator Jonathan Bergeron who affectionately also goes by Johnny Crap has a portfolio full of my demon skulls, angry vikings, down and out hobos, and a plethora of other dark visions. His ultra detailed pen drawings are extremely well done but his paintings also show his power over the brush.

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Colorful, Glitchy Digital Feminine Figures from Floti

Interesting take on the female form from Floti. Grainy neon colors flow through the figures as though you were looking at them through an infrared camera (except with more interesting color variation). With a glitchy, electronic vibe, these digital works nicely illustrate some of the darker, more ambiguous aspects of the Digital Age. I don’t want to say too much about this project, which seems to be in its infancy, but the source images are altered so heavily that it’s hard to contextualize all of the pictures, which allows for a nice exercise in attaching one’s own narratives and ideas to the works. Hope to see more of these mysterious ladies in the future.  (via)

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Olek’s Massive Crocodile Wrapped in Crocheted Stitching for the SESC

 

Brazilian cultural organization SESC opens their massive  arts show today. As part of the event, Polish “crochet-bombing” artist Olek has added her characteristic textile treatment to a giant crocodile installation in Sao Paulo, where the event is based. The huge, attention-demanding piece was produced in close cooperation with local Brazilian artists. Olek has gained attention for her idiosyncratic hot pink camo-patterned designs, and her ruthless street and gallery installations involving miscellaneous objects wrapped completely in crocheted stitching. The artist has applied her technique to cars, people, Wall Street’s Charging Bull, and more. See images of the recent Sao Paulo piece and examples of various past projects after the jump. (via)

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Alex Wein

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Alex Wein is a 19 year old photographer in the BFA Photo program at Maryland College of Art. He seems to have a background in skateboarding, having already been published in mainstream skate magazines (Transworld, Thrasher, etc.), though a great deal of his work, much of which is black and white, has little to do with skating. He particularly excels at portraits.

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Mark Benson’s Flu Shot Art

Reservations are now being accepted for limited edition flu shots; each shot comes with corresponding certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

-That phrase is taken from the press release for Get the Flu, Mark Benson‘s current exhibition at Ever Gold Gallery in San Francisco. A registered nurse was on site during the opening to administer real flu shots as part of a symbolic gesture to accompany the show, which focuses on themes surrounding the human need for control. It’s too hot?- turn on the air conditioner. Don’t want to get sick?- here, have a flu shot. Benson’s ability to present his commentary in such a unique, but direct way is really impressive.

Find some images from Get the Flu (on view til the 27th), below. And if you’re hankering for a further dose from the artist, you can still pick up a copy of Beautiful/Decay Book 7 right here which features a spread by him.

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Meghan Smythe Sculpts The Fleshly Contortions Of Passion And Death

Young Unbecoming (2015). Ceramic, glaze, glass, resin, epoxy, and plasticine.

Young Unbecoming (2015). Ceramic, glaze, glass, resin, epoxy, and plasticine.

Young Unbecoming (detail view) (2015).

Young Unbecoming (detail view) (2015).

Lunacy (2015). Ceramic, glaze, glass, resin, epoxy, and plasticine.

Lunacy (2015). Ceramic, glaze, glass, resin, epoxy, and plasticine.

Coupling (2015). Ceramic and glaze.

Coupling (2015). Ceramic and glaze.

Meghan Smythe is a California-based (Canadian-born) artist who creates expressively disturbing sculptures of crushed flesh and glistening viscera. The muted, peaches-and-cream colors are initially deceiving in their innocence; emerging from the twisted monuments are dismembered and defleshed body parts, shaved down and mashed together. Like a theater of the grotesque, faces gasp from beneath piles of entrails and moldering skulls, and limbs reach and splay in dynamic expressions of violence, love, lust, and tenderness. Much like the contortions of passion and death, the energy rolls throughout the compositions, oscillating between states of vigor and exhaustion. Leah Ollman, having reviewed Smythe’s recent solo show at the Mark Moore Gallery, provided this spot-on description of “Young Becoming” for The Los Angeles Times:

“Limbs are entwined, tongues extended. Clay is rarely, if ever, this carnal. Some of the skin is mannequin-smooth but veined with cracks. Some seep a pink foam or a pale fecal flood. Erotic pleasure plays a part here, but is only one of many competing charges” (Source).

By displaying representations of body parts in surprising (and unsettling) reconfigurations, Smythe brings the charges of pleasure and agony, beauty and squalor to the operating table. Displayed for us are simultaneous births and deaths, made almost indecipherable by the material realities of the body: the fluids, the waste, the mess of living, and the will to survive. In “A Light Culture”, for example, a man with a severed arm and scarred flesh sits quietly, wounded but pensive, while a disembodied hand gropes at his erection. Elsewhere, in “Lunacy”, a decapitated subject grimaces in despair while reaching for his heart. More tenderly still, in “Coupling”, two hands lie adjacent to each other and touch lightly. In moments of both intimacy and horror, Smythe turns the possibilities and limitations of the flesh into sculptures and makes them strangely beautiful.

Visit Smythe’s website and the Mark Moore Gallery to learn about her work and see additional images. Check out Ollman’s article for a captivating description of the solo show.

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