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Kyle James Dunn’s Patterened Steel Sculptures

Kyle James Dunn’s intricate patterned sculptures are created using a plasma cutter and lots of patience. The imagery revolves around the American idea of vacation and the island get away. A pervasive cultural myth that presents itself in literature, art, Hollywood film, and more, this fantasy is projected onto real places regardless of local cultures or economies. As such, its tropes–the desert isle, the Aloha shirt–exist in a fantasy realm outside of a specific time or place. They create a seductive language of artifice and leisure that is both costly and escapist to uphold.

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Mind Blowing Real-Time CGI Transforms A Models Face Into A Futuristic Canvas

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Nobumichi-Asai-Video-1  Nobumichi-Asai-Video-3

In his latest project OMOTE, Japanese producer Nobumichi Asai combines explicit real-time face tracking and projection mapping to create unbelievable transformations of a human face. While projecting computer generated imagery (CGI) onto buildings, room walls or cars isn’t new, using a live model as a dynamic canvas demonstrates an advances use of technology.

To accomplish such realistic and mesmerizing effect, Asai gathered a team of digital designers, CGI experts, and make-up artists. Together they created a set of digital “masks”, or, as Slash Gear referred to it, “electronic equivalent of makeup”. As shown in the video, model’s face should be scanned and mapped so the graphics can be projected and manipulated in real-time, even when the face moves around.

Despite that lots of technical details about OMOTE are left unsaid, Internet users have already started speculating on the possible use of such technology. Most suggestions include testing of products such as make-up, clothing, or even tattoos. Some state that advanced versions could be employed for medical purposes, like projecting X-Rays or creating “instant previews” of plastic surgery. Not to mention the game industry. (via Gizmodo)

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Elisa Johns

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Elisa Johns has a new selection of oil paintings up at Mike Weiss Gallery. Within the exhibition, entitled “Huntress,” Johns draws from mythology, in particular the female goddess/heroine, for her subject matter. Her fragile, waifish women reference today’s “revered” paradigm of female beauty, the high fashion model, while her delicately dripping washes set within soft, sparse canvases call to mind the minimal compositions of Japanese scroll art. The exhibition will be on view until May 9th.

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Australia’s Alpine Ready Their US Debut, A Is For Alpine

Alpine performing at Bardot (School Night) on March 4, 2013

As I write this, Alpine just wrote on Facebook that while on tour in the US, their video for Villages went past two million views. With solid reports coming out of SXSW about their many performances and KCRW picking their songs Lovers 1 and 2 as a recent double header Top Tune, it won’t be long before this Aussie six-piece finds their way into your ears.

I was lucky enough to catch them live at both Bardot in Hollywood and at Brooklyn’s Glasslands and both shows had me dancing from the first beat. Filled with energy, singers Phoebe Baker and Lou James get the crowd moving with their catchy tunes and lovely harmonies. I guarantee that once their album is released in the US, you’ll be hearing a lot more of them.

Alpine’s debut album, A is for Alpine will be released in the US on May 21st on Votiv Records. Check out the video for one of my favorites, Gasoline directed by Kris Moyes and be sure to catch them when they’re stateside again.

 

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Intimate Photos of Young Teens Moshing

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The kids in Emily Stein’s photographs of mosh pits at concerts are totally free. It’s fascinating that teens – who we all know are notoriously self-conscious – are able to let go to such a wild extent. At the same time, it is not at all surprising, as when are you wilder than in your teenage years? Stein captures the gamut of experiences: intense energy, happiness, rapture, contentedness, trance and goofiness.

If you’ve ever moshed, you know it’s a one of a kind experience. The energy can become very aggressive, but people are almost always responsible and friendly. You can be shoved violently by the same person who lends you a hand to pull you back up off the floor. It’s a great release of energy and opportunity for expression without judgment. You can flail and hurl yourself any way you want, and no one will call you on insanity, because they’re all in it with you. It’s beautiful to see the teenagers so enrapt in the experience. Stein’s photocomposition is candid and not overly calculated, probably because of the nature of the project. It’s exciting when you find the half-hidden expression of some head-banging preteen thoroughly enjoying their epic Saturday night.

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Hanksy: The Puntastic Street Fartist

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Just when you thought Banksy was the real trickster of the art world, along comes . . . Hanksy, the puntastic street fartist. His use of satire not only challenges the smug, but playfully subverts the current street art standard with a necessary dose of light antagonism.

Check out the video after the jump to see a short documentary about Hanksy’s mysterious persona: his meager “greeting card” beginnings and current mission statement, which centers on a dream of meeting Tom Hanks.

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Artists As Designers

Designers Frank Gehry Chair

Frank Gehry Chair

Michael Beitz Dining Table

Michael Beitz Dining Table

Yoshitomo Nara Speakers Designers

Yoshitomo Nara Doggy Radio

There is a long-standing tradition of artists blurring the boundary between art and design.  With institutions such as MOMA featuring an entire department devoted to architecture and design, it is considered an important part of art history and culture.

I recently heard New York Times art critic Roberta Smith lecture and she mentioned that it’s a shame our society doesn’t place more emphasis on visual literacy education.  If we did she believes that everything in our world, from buildings to city layouts, to objects, would be more aesthetically pleasing.  Here are some instances of artists who emphasized the concept or appearance of an object rather than simply its function, bridging the gap between art and design:

Donald Judd, one of the leaders of Minimalism, has an amazing legacy in design.  Another well-known architect who creates highly designed furniture is Frank Gehry.  Roy McMakin is a Seattle-based artist who usually incorporates an element of verbal pun.  McMakin’s designs feature an overarching investigation of how perception influences meaning.  Hannes Van Severen and Michael Beitz both create captivating, surreal furniture.  Artists like David Shrigley and Adam McEwen work humor into their design-work.  Even artist Yves Klein has a table, created under the direction of his widow, that features his famous blue.  Damien Hirst designed a chair replete with his signature butterflies and Yoshitomo Nara designed “doggy radio,” a fully functional radio in the form of a dog.

It’s not uncommon for artists to create functional objects, but those objects do often stand out for their elevated level of design and conceptual consideration.  If indeed everyone put as much thought into form as they did function the world would probably be a much better looking, or at least a more visually interesting, place.

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Michelle Muzyka’s Memories In Decay

Check out Michelle Muzyka’s Memories In Decay installation consisting of ultra detailed cut paper sculptures.

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