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Matt Barton

Matt Barton
Artist Matt Barton graduated from Carnegie Mellon in 2006, spending his time there setting up mechanized taxidermy animals in strange and colorful situations. In “Time-O-Rama: Electric Infinity with Real Plastic,” made in 2006, there were 20 of those said motorized animals, two video projections, 5 sound cd’s, flowers blooming, leaves falling and changing colors, lightning and thunder, wine was dispensed from a nozzle sticking out of the deer’s ribs…and a partridge on a pear tree. That last one I added myself. Matt has also collaborated with Extreme Animals, hyper bitmosh-rock-band of artist Jacob Ciocci (Paper Rad).

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BEAUTIFUL/DECAY IS HIRING BLOG CONTRIBUTORS!

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Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserve exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world  reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then send a few short writing samples (or links) as well as a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay blog contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

We are looking for smart writers and contributors in all corners of the globe who have their hands on the pulse of the contemporary art and design world and want to join our independent group of writers, critics, and art enthusiasts. Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of five 300 word posts per week.  This is a paid part-time freelance position.

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Stephen Cheetham’s Iconic Laugh

This  Stephen Cheetham character sure knows how to pack a lot of laughs into his illustrations. Nothing says cancer like a a lung with a dozen hands and a butt head!

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Antonio Ladrillo

I’m loving these clunky illustrations by Barcelona based  graphic artist Antonio Ladrillo.

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Clarissa Bonet’s Somber Reconstructions Of The Urban Landscape

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet Photography

Clarissa Bonet Photography 1

Everyone has a different perception of the city, to some it might feel luxurious and culturally rich, to others it might appear to be dirty and smelly, and to many natives, including Chicago based artist Clarissa Bonet, the city is this somber, anonymous, and emotionally charged space.

Bonet’s acclaimed on-going series, City Space, captures her personal perception of the urban landscape and its relationship to the ones that inhabit it.

“The Urban space is striking. Its tall and mysterious building, crowds of anonymous people, and endless seas of concrete constantly intrigue me,” the artist says.  

Her images are reconstructions of her perceptions/past experiences in the cityscape. Some may seem overly dramatic- as her play with lights and darks and muted colors, as she mentions in her artist statement on her website, are both visual strategies she is interested in working with.

On her artist statement, she also mentions that she reconstructs “the city as a stage to transform the physical space into a psychological one. The images […] do not represent a commonality of experience but instead prove a personal interpretation of the urban landscape.”

One of the most interesting elements in this body of work is her ability to transfer what would seem to be a mundane act on the streets to a scene that speaks of the human psyche, and emotion in general. Her subjects, most with their head down or covered, seem to purposely appear anonymous, giving the viewer a sense of them not being there, as they blend with the rest of the composition. Could this be cultural commentary/criticism on behalf of the artist? That is not out of the question, as these powerful and somber, yet beautiful images do make the viewer question contemporary living in the cityscape.

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Nature Themed Graphite Drawings from Nicomi Nix Turner

 

Nicomi Nix Turner draws upon her upbringing in the Pacific Northwest in her Nature themed  graphite illustration works. The delicate graphite lines work nicely with some of Turner’s busy, full-of-life compositions. Beetles, insects, skulls, and girls that look like they’ve spent their whole lives in the forest come together as one. It’s fun to go over these works a couple times trying to uncover every element of their makeup. That quality of  “oneness”, when considered as equal parts subject matter and composition, comes off really strongly. Beautiful stuff. Check out her blog too.

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Matthias Männer

Mattias mannerMatthias Männer was born in 1976 in Mitterteich, Germany. His organic-like figures are based on simple geometrical forms and are mostly prototypes or models for hypothetical monumental sculptures. On account of their dimensions, true execution would be utopian.

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Taizo Yamamoto’s Drawings Of Homeless Shopping Carts

Taizo Yamamoto‘s shopping carts are familiar images we’ve all seen before. Crammed into  alleyways or left abandoned in the streets, these shopping carts are part of the scenery of a city. Yamamoto uses graphite and colored pencils to illustrate the carts in great detail, highlighting their contents and the strange collections contained within. By choosing to exclude the people who use these carts, Yamamato is bringing all the focus to the carts themselves. There’s a sense of an anthropological study here, like these carts and the collections they contain are specimen meant to be studied.

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