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Laid Back Surf And Skateboarding Illustration

Stevie Gee Skateboarding

Stevie Gee Skateboarding

Stevie Gee Skateboarding

Artist Stevie Gee seems to be as laid back as his art work. Skateboards, surfboards, fins, and posters all bear his unique styling.  Gee’s illustration work feels as if it’s pulled from an endless sunset in the middle of an endless summer.  At once retro and fresh, the images seem to be culled from a collective memory of skateboarding/surf culture and its heritage.  His endearing style has won him high-profile clients such as Vans, Nike, and Lacoste.
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Christina Mrozik’s Animal Instincts

Michigan based artist Christina Mrozik’s sculptures and drawings focus on  stories of migration, self awareness, shelter, and mating.

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Classic Paintings Re-Imagined As Photographs

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Generic Art Solutions Classic Paintings

Generic Art Solutions is a duo made up of artists Matt Vis and Tony Campbell.  The two artists comment on present day anxiety by re-imagining classic paintings.  Their photographs are carefully staged, often to resemble classic works of art.  Their images are clearly populated with subjects, clothing, and settings that are all modern.  However, the compositions immediately bring to mind the paintings of Caravaggio, Goya, and Marat.  Perhaps a reason the images of the classic artwork and re-imagined in the duo’s photographs are still relevant is because people have never moved beyond the anxieties and problems that plagued us centuries ago.  The gallery statement for their upcoming exhibit at Miami’s Mindy Solomon Gallery expounds on that point:

“The work of Generic Art Solutions (whether it be a photograph, performance, video, or print) begins with a thoughtful re-examination of the human condition, and the effect of recurring cycles of technological advancements and cultural awakenings. But, how much has mankind really evolved? Aren’t we essentially still making the same mistakes? According to the artists, it would certainly seem so. Compare Gericault’s famed painting ‘The Raft of the Medusa,’ 1819, to the G.A.S. representation of Deepwater Horizon’s oil spill in April 2010, as depicted in their photographic work ‘The Raft’ (2010): these two artworks portray shockingly similar tales of human suffering brought on by corporate greed. Or, take Delacroix’s ‘Liberty Leading the People’ commemorating the French Revolution in 1830, and the perpetual revolutionary uprisings of the Arab Spring as seen in G.A.S.’s ‘Liberty,’ 2011. The artists state: “However evolved we may think we are, the folly of human behavior is still the root of all societal (dis)functions. This is a sobering thought that demands attention. But there is a message of hope in these contemporary homages: through thoughtful reexamination and a commitment to change, we can break the cycle of repeating our mistakes.”

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Someone Released 1.5 Million Balloons Into The Sky And Ruined Everything

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If you’ve ever loosed a balloon into the sky, by accident or on purpose, you have probably had that uncanny feeling that you’ve done something simple but irreversible; no matter how high you jump, the balloon will forever be out of your grasp. Now multiply that sensation by 1.5 million; twenty-eight years ago, in a misguided attempt to break the record for most launched balloons in history, the United Way of Cleveland released one and a half million balloons into the sky for a fundraiser known as Balloonfest ’86. As the weather grew grim, the hasty event administrators freed the eager helium-filled balls of color into the sky, and it was all caught on film by the photographer Thom Sheridan.

The images are pretty remarkable; when shot at close range, the balloons look to be raining from above, coloring the skyline and bridges like jimmies over an ice cream sundae. Pink, red, blue, and yellow litter the frame like large-scale confetti. But viewed from further away, the balloons form something resembling an angry plague of locusts that ominously mushroom above the city. They puff up and away, and their colors blur, forming a bloody wound across the sky.

Given the historical context, these photographs are even more theatrical, grim and tragic. Two people died as a result of the event, and a horse was badly spooked and injured. The winds that day caused the balloons to flood together, forming a substantial cloud that obscured the view of aircrafts; helicopters were unable to rescue the victims of a boating accident. In one terrible anecdote, a coast guard member explained searching for the heads of the drowning people and being totally unable to differentiate them from balloons. The entire city remained littered for weeks.

This strange, tragic story reads like a bizarre little fable where excess, pride and even the most well-intentioned aspirations breed disaster and ruin. These photographs, these astounding relics of a city’s hopes and traumas, say it all.  (via Gizmodo and Viral Forest)

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AKA.CORLEONE

beat_800 Pedro Campiche  (AKA.CORLEONE) is a graphic designer and illustrator from Portugal. His work includes illustration and type play. He is also the founder of OK! Collective, a platform for creative and artistic projects. At just 24 years of age, it’s definately impressive. Stop by his page and give him some positive feedback because his work is awesome.

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Rebecca Manson’s ceramic sculptures have a life of their own

Rebecca Manson sent me a text message not too long ago with an image of a unicycle she had just sculpted and an accompanying message that read, “Here’s a sneak peek, his name is Peter.” It was adorable and part of an exhibit she had created at CSULB. But then moments later my phone rang, “Daniel” she said in horror, “the main sculpture in my exhibit just broke.”

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Vik Muniz And Three Other Artists Who Use Unusual Materials To Create Stunning Portraits

Vik Muniz

Vik Muniz

Andrew Myers

Andrew Myers

Ben Durham

Ben Durham

Christian Faur

Christian Faur

A highly traditional artistic activity, portraiture is given new perspective through the eyes of the four artists below.  Each of these artists seeks unconventional means to create a subject’s likeness.

Vik Muniz incorporates quotidian objects and materials, such as diamonds, sugar, thread, chocolate syrup and garbage into his works to create unique portraits.  Often the medium will imply something about the subject, as with his iconic portraits of catadores, self-designated pickers of recyclable materials.  Muniz photographed the catadores in Jardim Gramacho, which is the largest garbage dump in the world, located just outside Rio de Janerio.  He photographed them and then re-created their portraits out of garbage. This process is documented in the film Waste Land

Ben Durham creates portraits of alleged criminals, all of whom attended the same high school as him in Lexington, Kentucky.  Knowing none of the subjects personally, Durham ignites a viewer’s imagination by offering no clue as to their alleged crimes.  The images, sketched on paper Durham handmade, are composed of text and titled after the subject’s name.  Streams of gibberish, the text captures contours and texture impeccably.

Laguna Beach-based artist Andrew Myers creates distinct, expressive and tactile portraits made of mixed media, mainly screws.  In the displayed portrait, Andrew depicts filmmaker Benjamin Pitts using approximately 8,000 screws, oil paint, and phonebook pages. The piece was an experiment in expressing movement with static objects.

Christian Faur’s interest with art lies in the idea that the medium can become the message.  Intertwining form and function Faur’s more recent work incorporates crayons to create mesmerizing portraits.  Three-dimensional and abstract up close, the portraits flatten and emerge the further away from them a viewer gets.

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Amelia Bauer’s Illuminated Forest Scenes Inspired By The American Occult

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Photographer Amelia Bauer’s series Burned Over showcases brilliant spectacles of light with a supernatural twist. The images are inspired by the deeply-infused religious history of the New York region, and the dark forests have an eerie light or haze that is concentrated in a tree or covered clearing. Bauer explains her photographs  in an interview with Feature Shoot, stating:

My work is a series of discrete investigations into our cultural conceptions of the natural world. I examine my surroundings, specifically rural Central New York, through a lens of history and mythology. Aesthetic traditions are repositioned to create spaces that exist somewhere between our fears of the uncultivated wild and our romanticism of the ‘virgin’ landscape. In this way I explore the American experience of the frontier — the transitional landscapes at the boundaries of civilization.

In upstate New York, there’s an area called the “burned-over district,” where religious fervor tread through the landscape in the early 19th century. The territory was the birthplace of several early American religious and occult groups like the Shakers and Mormon, as well as the Spiritualists. It’s the Spiritualists who this series is really inspired by, and they believed that Mediums could interact with spirits via seances. They created photographic evidence of these meetings and used gauze, double exposure and darkroom techniques to produce their images. Bauer further explains:

Inspired by these photographs, I set out to make portraits of the landscape that hosted such religious and spiritual pursuits by those early settlers. Working with a pyrotechnics crew, custom fireworks were created specifically for the shoot, and hiked into the forests of rural upstate New York. The photographs that make up the Burned Over series reveal something felt but not seen about these forests, as though the land itself holds a presence we seek to uncover but fear revealing entirely. (Via Feature Shoot)

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