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Just In Time For Winter, Tony Tasset And Three Other Artists Who Create Snowmen Not Out Of Snow

Tony Tasset

Tony Tasset

Todd Hebert

Todd Hebert

Hume_Gary_Back-of-Snowman_KingAu_MG_11792

Gary Hume, Back of a Snoman

Kristina Solomoukha, Discoba

Kristina Solomoukha, Discoba

Winter is coming!  Well, not so much in Los Angeles (although it did get down into the 40s last week), but across the country it seems to be looking a lot like Christmas.  One of any creative-minded individual’s favorite winter pastimes is making snowmen.  The four artists listed below take the art form to another level, incorporating the usually ephemeral figures into their art oeuvre in unique and intriguing ways.

Tony Tasset’s snowmen are partly funny, partly sad and partly just amazing sculptures.  Made from glass, resin, brass, enamel paint, poly-styrene, stainless steel and bronze the snow replicas are surprisingly convincing.  Catching a viewer off guard in a gallery setting, the snowmen freeze (pun intended) in time a phenomenon that is never the same—unlike in real life, Tasset’s snow personalities might last forever.

Kristina Solomoukha lives and works in Paris, France.  Her process is a reflection on urban space.  She pulls from codes and vocabulary from urban environments, combining them with her personal ideological view to create individual works and installations.  Playing with words and the absurd, her works, such as Discobaba, magnify and exaggerate existing aberrations.

Identified as a Young British Artist, Gary Hume, now 51, creates his snowmen images and sculptures by reducing them to their simplest forms.  Stacked spheres, the shapes are mere implications of a snowman, allowing a viewer’s mind to complete the association.   Titling the series “Back of a Snowman,” Hume’s works take on a melancholic mood.  We suddenly picture the snowman contemplating his own mortality, which in turn, might make us reflect upon our own.

Described as a pseudo Pop artist Todd Hebert’s meditative paintings apply airbrushed acrylic and super-realistic renderings to common holiday imagery.  The effects are narrative in a way that allows a viewer to be reflective about life at the various points of the year marked by the holidays.

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World’s Smallest 3D Pen Lets You Write And Draw In The Air

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The latest in handheld 3D printing, Lix is the smallest 3D printing pen in the world. This device allows you to write and draw in the air, without using paper. Lightweight (around 1.5 ounces) and easy to use, the pen fits the hand more comfortably than other, larger handheld 3D printers, allowing for more intricate details and designs. Even better, the tool can be powered by a wall charger or a USB port. The biggest challenge for the designers has been the reduction of the mechanical parts to fit into the 12mm diameter aluminum tube.

Though it was exceeded the amount of requested funding, Lix still has a Kickstarter campaign in the works, and you can check out even more information on their website. The pen is currently available for $155, including 5 bags of mixed colored plastic. (via colossal)

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Pari Ehsan Thoughtfully Pairs Chic Outfits With Contemporary Art

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New York based interior designer Pari Ehsan marries high fashion and high art by posing in outfits that thoughtfully complement artworks, installations, and architecture, posting the results to Instagram and her website. Ehsan’s project began when she was taking a personal portrait in front of an art piece and noticed that her fur coat created an interesting juxtaposition. Ehsan then decided to begin this fashion-art project in order to explore a creative outlet outside of her job as an interior designer. Her background in architecture – she studied it at both USC and UCLA before moving to NYC – helps inform her approach to the project, with some of her fashion looks complementing building and interior designs. Every Saturday, Ehsan hops around New York City’s galleries, looking for inspiration. “It’s very intuitive when I see something I like and get a good feeling about,” Ehsan says. “At that point, if I’m really compelled to do an outfit pairing, I find the look and do the styling.”

Ehsan’s Instagram account was recently nominated by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) for a Fashion Instagrammer of the Year Award, alongside other stand-out fashion-related accounts. Though she didn’t win, Ehsan’s account is still impressive, especially considering that fact that most of the other nominees – including the winner – work in fashion or media. Clearly, Ehsan’s lack of insider status has not hurt her project’s success.  (via blanton museum of art)

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Shi Jindian Wire Mesh Motorcyles

Chinese artist Shi Jindian work at first glance may look like an xray of your favorite motorcycle or car but it in fact is creating out of a complex woven wire mesh. Shi Jindian process involves wrapping the wires around every square inch of the object and then carefully removing or destroying the object, leaving only its wire mesh skeleton. (via toxel)

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The Expeditions And Secret Underground Homes Of Urban Explorers

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Since 2011, Raptor Blood (Blackie Burns) has been following a group of urban explorers (going by the name of Cave Clan) around the tunnel and cave networks underneath Sydney in Australia and photographing what they see, where they dwell and how they live. Connecting with the group through their shared interest in urban decay and abandoned architecture, Burns is able to access areas that are usually closed off to outsiders. He says of his first  encounters with some members of the group:

The two dudes I met with seemed pretty cool and were informative about the group and had a strong appreciation for the architecture of the tunnels we visited. Although, our expedition was a little worrying when I was walking between the two going down a drain that was barely my shoulders width. We were walking for about 10 minutes, [and] as the tunnel got deeper, hotter and more humid, our conversation started to get a little strange. The guy walking behind me started to talk about masturbation and how he liked to watch himself through a mirror… I asked to leave and luckily enough nothing too strange ended up happening.

Cave Clan thoroughly live their passion of exploring underutilized and forgotten spaces. They turn the most understated corners into homes, personalized with objects of meaning and importance. Burns talks about his surprise of how comfortable some of the dwellings he visited were:

The first, which is located under a huge castle looking sandstone bridge was equipped with electricity, bbq and bar. The area was dusty though, to the point where anybody would feel sick from being in there too long. The second was in a connecting chamber in a network of tunnels running underneath one of Sydney’s secondary CBDs. The drains were surprisingly dry with no bugs. Any Storm water was directed from the living areas and during summer it was surprisingly cold down there, really not a bad place to live!

See more footage of his explorations here on his tumblr and here on instagram.

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Derek Paul Boyle Creates Paintings By Dragging Canvases On His Vespa Scooter

Alameda Street

Alameda Street

Beverly Blvd

Beverly Blvd

Franklin Ave

Franklin Ave

These images are probably not what you think. Derek Paul Boyle‘s latest project is called “Drag Paintings”, and are a result of the artist weaving through traffic, holding a stretched canvas under-foot and allowing the different textures and surfaces of the roads to create the image. What results is a very visceral, tangible account of a temporary action that has been frozen in time. Boyle says about them:

The drags are performance that result in a painting – the physical becomes an imprint of the gestural.
The drag paintings are events as objects – abstracts of the physical grittiness and intensity of Los Angeles’s traffic infrastructure.

These paintings have an ominous feel, a beauty that emerges despite first appearances. They are a violent action made light and somewhat graceful. Boyle’s work always contains a sense of playfulness and humor. He enjoys challenging the expected state of something. Either by juxtaposing the use of an object, or the context in which it is used. The Drag Series is definitely a challenge to the tradition of mark making and action painting. He surprises us by producing something elegant through the act of destruction. Boyle goes on to say:

I am interested in the power of contradiction, objects as events, and incompatible states of the self – what was once bound is made free, the known made unknown.

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Jonathan Allen

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Tommy Angel is Jonathan Allen’s bible-thumping alter ego, whose cheezy 70’s kitsch performances blend “miracles” culled from Christendom, Joke-shop magic and art’s own hall of mirrors alike. Drawing parallels between faith and illusion, conceit and deception, religion and slight of hand, Allen raises complex issues surrounding the nature of spectacle and its myriad applications across history.

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Tattooed Seniors Show Off Their Inked Bodies

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When we get tattooed, our flesh becomes an elastic canvas, and it’s only a matter of time before we start hearing, “but what will it look like when you’re old and wrinkled?” As we age, our skin stretches, sags, and becomes marked by time and gravity; our ink moves in unpredictable ways as black fades to blue and linear shapes begin to blur. Part of the magic of the tattoo medium lies in this accidental metamorphosis or art and body, and reddit user “clevknife” hopes to challenge the idea that time breeds unsavory, attractive ink. His project, titled “What about when you get old?” showcases elderly individuals embracing their well-worn tattoos and proving that there truly is no expiration date on good art.

Clevknife’s shots maintain a casual, offhand aesthetic that might seem amateurish but is somehow allied with anti-conformist tattoo culture. The curated images lack a ready coherence, jumping from black and white to color, from professionally lit to unpracticed and unfocused. While some appear to be the result of standard portrait sessions, some are reminiscent of the from-the-hip style of early street art.

An otherwise unassuming older man stands in a grocery store, fists raised and forearms emboldened by ink; the limited depth of field serves only to heighten the drama of his pose. Another subject is cast in nostalgic blacks and whites as he mimes, slicks his hair back. No two subjects are alike, but one thing’s for sure: these human canvases don’t regret a thing. Our bodies may age and morph, but our art will adapt to the changing landscape of our flesh. (via Lost at E Minor and My Modern Met)

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