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Pakayla Biehn’s Double Exposure Paintings

Pakayla Biehn is a San Franciso-based artist who collaborates with photographers in her Double Exposure series, by taking inspiration from double exposure photography and painting the images using oil on canvas. The end result is an incredibly beautiful and detailed series with an oneiric quality.

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Photographer Uses Sugar, Cotton, Feathers and Chocolate to Construct Stunning Landscapes

 

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Matthew Albanese.

“DIY Paradise” was constructed from cotton, salt, cooked sugar, tin foil, feathers & canvas.

 

My work involves the construction of small-scale meticulously detailed models using various materials and objects to create emotive landscapes. Every aspect from the construction to the lighting of the final model is painstakingly pre-planned using methods which force the viewers perspective when photographed from a specific angle. Using a mixture of photographic techniques such as scale, depth of field, white balance and lighting I am able to drastically alter the appearance of my materials.—Matthew Albanese

 

Matthew Albanese is a fine art photographer from New Jersey who specializes in creating and photographing miniatures from common household objects and materials. “New Life I”    (pictured above)  was constructed using painted parchment paper, thread, hand dyed ostrich feathers, carved chocolate, wire, raffia, masking tape, coffee, synthetic potting moss and cotton.

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Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson at FFDG in San Francisco

Tom Betthauser:

Both artist’s work share an obtuse unearthly charm as a common language, and their work promises to have an energetic and productive conversation in their upcoming exhibition.

Great show up at FFDG in San Francisco right now. Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson spent a couple weeks on the beast coast cooking up some vibey abstractions for us and now they’re ready to be seen! Both artist’s works definitely play off each other really nicely, and if you’re out in SF, this one is not to be missed. See more from the show below.

Images courtesy of FFDG.

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HR Giger’s Skeletal Structure Bar Resembles An Ancient Castle From Your Deepest Nightmares

Welcome to the HR Giger bar located at the museum of the famous sci-fi artist in Gruyeres, Switzerland. Decked out with bone chairs, spinal chord ceilings, and dead baby  relief wallpaper this bar is surely to leave a lasting impression on while your awake as well as in your darkest dreams. (via)

The interior of the otherworldly environment that is the H.R. Giger Museum 
Bar is a cavernous, skeletal structure covered by double arches of vertebrae 
that crisscross the vaulted ceiling of an ancient castle. The sensation of being in this extraordinary setting recalls the tale of Jonah and the whale, lending the feel of being literally in the belly of a fossilized, prehistoric beast, or that 
you have been transported into the remains of a mutated future civilization.
Text excerpt from Secret Magazine No. 23, by Javier De Pison

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Black Friday TURKEY CULT Sale Starts…Now!

Welcome to the Beautiful/Decay Black Friday Extravaganza! Simply use the discount code “Turkeycult” during checkout to get 30 percent off of everything on the site including our on sale items. This sale ends Sunday the 28th at Midnight so get to the savings before your favorite book or tee sell out!

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The Last Days Of Christ Reanacted By An Entire Town In Mexico

On top of the Sierra Madre mountains of Mexico there is a town called Taxco where literally everyone participates in a massive reenactment of the  last days of Christ with elaborate costumes, processions, and scary hooded men that look more like klansmen than holy men. Photographer Paul Alexander Knox has documented this bizarre religious parade in all its glory complete with Roman soldiers, Judas, baby angels, and of course virgin girls.

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Made With Color Presents: Britton Tolliver’s Deconstructed Grid Paintings

Britton Tolliver painting

Britton Tolliver painting

Britton Tolliver painting

This week we’re bringing you another talented artist as part of our partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color. Each week we bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who are using Made With Color to create clean and sleek websites. Made With Color sites aren’t just easy on the eyes but feature powerful yet simple backend which allows anyone to create a professional site with just a few clicks.This week we are excited to share the layered paintings of Los Angeles based painter Britton Tolliver.

Where does abstraction and geometry meet? In what field do they cease to be independent systems and gel into one hybrid – something new altogether? Britton Tolliver’s idiosyncratic paintings are deeply rooted in this intersection. Neither solely abstract nor geometric, his paintings really entertain another idea, which is difficult to pin down. It is in the amalgamation of these different ideas and processes that Tolliver’s paintings find their own identity, somewhere in the middle of both.

See more of Britton’s works after the jump or in person on may 22nd at LAND’s group show “Painting In Place” in Los Angeles and in a three person show at Samuel Freeman Gallery in June.

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Do Ho Suh’s Cottage In The Sky

When Do Ho Suh first proposed “Fallen Star” to UC San Diego’s Stuart Collection, he “never thought it would be realized.” A cottage built from scratch and permanently joined to an existing campus building – several stories up in the air? Right, mm-hm.

“Fallen Star” is hard to miss. The 18th addition to the renowned collection of site-specific sculptures at UC San Diego is in a central campus location. It sits atop Jacobs Hall, also known as Engineering Building 1 – cantilevered at an angle from a corner of the seventh floor.

The house was built during the fall of 2011. On Nov. 15, it was gently hoisted 100 feet and then attached to Jacobs Hall.

It has since been furnished and accessorized. Its garden is growing: There’s a plum tree, a wisteria vine, tomatoes and more. Lights flicker on at night; a TV, too. And steam, simulating smoke, sometimes rises from the chimney.

To some, imagining Oz, it might look like a tornado-tossed interloper from Kansas. To others, more biologically minded, perhaps like a small blue creature living in symbiosis with its much larger host. Either way, it can be seen from multiple vantage points on campus and off. (Watch a video about the installation after the jump)

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