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Behind-the-Scenes with “Art Works Every Time” Artist: Harrison Roberts

Harrison Roberts' Studio

Harrison Roberts' Studio

Harrison Roberts’ work combines vertiginous, mandalic quality linework, texture and patterns with a pop color sensibility. Harrison is near and dear to our hearts as he actually was a fearless B/D intern earlier this year! We’re really excited he’ll be part of our upcoming “Art Works Every Time” exhibition! Just 4 days away now…

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Mike Dargas’ Lusciously Hyperrealistic Paintings Of People Dripping In Honey

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German artist Mike Dargas paints hyperrealistic works of women’s’ faces covered in honey. The luscious, visceral images are up-close, frontal portraits that show the gentle creases in skin as well as the viscous glare on the liquid as it travels down their face. It’s fascinating to see people dripping with thick substance – it’s as if they’re frozen in time.

Dargas finds the models for his painting in everyday life, and they aren’t limited to specific types. According to his website, “He portrays young and old, beautiful and dark, fragile and strong people. They are lost in thoughts, show inner conflicts or transmit a unique and sometimes even holy calmness.

Dargas isn’t the only one to douse his subjects in honey. Check out Blake Little’s photos of nude models covered in buckets and buckets of the stuff. (Via The Artful Desperado)

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Alex Cornell

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San Francisco based Alex Cornell has a track record of pursued professions that makes most feel like underachievers; he is a graphic designer, musician, and dabbles in photography.  These collection of posters are reminiscent of 40’s atomic bomb informational posters with a hint of contemporary influence.  His organization of graphic elements is very clean and eye pleasing.

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Robert Minervini

Robert Minervini’s paintings are an accurate representation of how the true Los Angeles appears to me. Polluted atmosphere, palm trees (not native to LA) implanted everywhere, crumbling and tired buildings, freeway ramps… this is what my home looks like.

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Jonathan Haggard

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I was tipped off by electroniccottage about Jonathan Haggard. He is a great graphic designer and illustrator with a defined style. I appreciate his poster’s strange facts, honesty, and humor, check him out!

 

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Last Day Of Our Massive Biannual Subscription Sale!

This is it! It’s the very last day of our Biannual Subscription sale extravaganza.  You have until tonight at midnight to reserve your copy of Beautiful/Decay Book: 7 by subscribing. Not only will you get 3 gorgeously designed books but you’ll get intimate access to hundreds of creatives from around the world via our indepth articles and interviews.

So drop what you’re doing, use discount code discountdecaysub and get a one year subscription for the discounted price of $34.00!

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Bruce Ingram

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Bruce Ingram’s sculptures feel both natural and fantastic. Like discovering a new cave system or a perfectly preserved dead hummingbird in your garage (which really happened to me; the bird thing not the cave thing). I’ve always felt like one of the signs of “good” art is that you kind of forget that someone had to make it. Ingram’s work feels like it manifested itself–like the world meant for it to be.

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Artist Zaps 15,000 Volts Of Electricity Into film To Create Beautiful Abstractions

Phillip Stearns - photographic image Phillip Stearns - photographic image  Phillip Stearns - photographic image

Brooklyn electronic media artist Phillip Stearns is exhibiting a new series of some pretty wild photography, and all produced without the use of a camera. Applying different household materials (bleach, vinegar, baking soda, hydrogen peroxide, salt, rubbing alcohol) before and after exposure to electrical currents, Stearns was able to produce some electrifying images. Applying 15,000 volts of alternating current directly to the surface of instant film, the electricity arced, ignited, and sparked, leaving beautiful patterns in the emulsion.

Stearns has been exploring his understanding of what a digital or photographic image is, through many different approaches. He sees images, sound and video not only as signals, or a way or producing something, but as raw materials to use and to exploit. In the Evident Material exhibition, he puts this theory into practice and explores the relationship between the human eye and the camera.

The sentiment that the camera is an extension of the eye is taken to an extreme. When looking through the Fujifilm FP-100c instant color film datasheets, the similarities between the layering of materials in the film and the layering of cells in the retinal is striking. Perhaps it is because the development of such film technologies parallels an evolving understanding of how the eye sees. (Source)

The similarities don’t end there. Stearns commented that the sparks he was experimenting with on the film stock, function in a similar way as the electric impulses in our eyes when processing images.

I find it curious and exhilarating that the impressions left behind after developing these extreme exposures so perfectly resemble networks of blood vessels in the retina. (Source)

Evident Material exhibition opened on November 15 at Transfer Gallery in New York and will continue until December 13. (Via The Creators Project)

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