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Ed Fairburn Draws Delicately Detailed Portraits On Vintage Maps And Star Charts

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Artist Ed Fairburn is using maps and star charts as a base to draw detailed portraits. Inlaid in the weave of the roads, signs and lines, the faces appear textured and emotional.

Ed Fairburn draws dashes or fills up a specific area on the map. Playing with the existing colors symbolizing lands, water or housings. It takes him a couple of days to a month to complete a drawing. The artist draws on vintage road maps looking forward to discovering uncommon names or places he once visited in the past. The star charts drawings confer a different atmosphere, a poetic mood to the faces trapped in the constellation. He chooses his ‘canvas’ himself. The patterns and orientations are key for him to start drawing. In terms of details, lines, names printed on the maps; the more cluttered, the better outcome. 

The more contrast exists between the lines, shapes and shadows on the portraits, the more depth it creates on the overall drawing. Not two inches are ever the same, and yet the accumulation of dashes and small lines create a pattern inherent to a part of the face. For either the road or star maps; the association of a land, a space with a human face resonates with evasion and travel. The possibility for the viewer to escape from reality and dive into a foreign land, a dream destination. ( via Booooooom)

Ed Fariburn’s drawings will be displayed at the Mike Wright Gallery in Denver, Colorado until December 19th 2015.

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Unbelievable Photographs Of The Human Eye

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The subject of Suren Manvelyan is so basic to photography it seems to hardly ever be captured individually.  While typically considered as “windows to the soul” in art, Manvelyan’s series considers the beauty of the human eye simply as a biological structure.  Eye colors are especially vivid in his images.  However, it is the texture of the eye that is especially arresting.  The iris seems like an alien terrain or some or some sort of cosmic object contrasting with the black void of the pupil.

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Surprising Reactions To George Ferrandi Falling Asleep On Strangers In Subway

George Ferrandi - Performance

Personal space, something that’s cherished in the United States, is put to the test in Brooklyn-based artist George Ferrandi’s series, I Felt Like I Knew You. This site-specific performance features Ferrandi on the crowded New York City subway. In her words, she transforms the space between two people from being stiff and guarded to something that resembles a space friends would share. Essentially, she sits in a packed subway car, rests her head on a stranger’s shoulders, and documents what happens through iPhone videos shot by Angela Gilland.

Not surprisingly, not everyone is receptive to Ferrandi’s invasion of their “personal bubble.” Some people wake her up or passive aggressively move their shoulder. Some, however, just let her rest. In an interview with Katherine Brooks of the Huffington Post, Ferrandi was asked if she learned anything from the project. Her response:

For me, this piece taps into the mystery and fragility of how we relate and communicate to each other as human animals, full of signs secret even to ourselves. It’s given me a deeper understanding of the way New Yorkers evolve to maintain their privacy in public spaces. We carry our energy so closely. We’re often pressed up against each other on the train with a kind of “I wish I wasn’t touching you” energy that is invisible but respected. This is part of why so many people are touched by a photo of one man resting his head on the shoulder of another; it challenges a preconception about tenderness between strangers, especially in New York. And it offers a tiny counterpoint to the Culture of Fear being cultivated in America.

All images are stills from iPhone videos. They make you ponder how you would act if Ferrandi put her head on your shoulder. Would you engage her or move your shoulder? (Via Huffington Post)

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British artist Matt Williams A.K.A Uberkraaft  should be renamed Uberkool! He’s got a beautiful portfolio full of ultra detailed black and white illustrations as well as perfectly colored pieces that are bold but not too pushy. More visual eye candy after the jump!

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Kara Walker’s Gigantic Sugar-Coated Female Sphinx Makes A Powerful Statement

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Kara Walker’s new sculpture “A Subtlety” is pure white, coated in 160,000 pounds of bleached sugar; with this modern take on the ancient sphinx, the legendary artist crafts a towering black face in honor of the slave laborers who worked in sugar cane fields. The powerful work is meant to address racial and sexual exploitation; like the sugar that coats her polystyrene core, this black female figure has been pressured, against nature, into succumbing to whiteness.

The work is now on display at the old Williamsburg, Brooklyn Domino sugar factory shed, where it reaches to the ceiling and extends for a magnificent 75 feet. The mythical creature is a powerful assertion of the black female self; the face quite resembles the artists’ own, and a carefully wrought bandana subtly references the stereotypical (and often offensive) symbol of the mammy, a slave woman who nurtured and brought up white children. Walker has been the subject of debate in the past for her use of contested imagery, and despite the controversy surrounding the “mammy” figure, she is presented here as powerful and divine.

Like the ancient sphinxes of Egypt and Greece, Walker’s monolithic creation is godly, simultaneously fearsome and comforting. The sphinx, known for protecting the tombs of royalty, becomes the guardian of history, interrupting a white-washed historical narrative to make visible the labor of the men and women who were kept enslaved. Her face is serene, assured, and unyielding. The sphinx character, in addition to being a protector, is also dangerous, renowned for devouring those who cannot answer her riddle; Walker’s sphinx is similarly confrontational in her overwhelming size, forcing viewers to confront the complex and painful history of American industry. (via The New York Times)

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Alexandra Zaharova & Ilya Plotnikov

Alexandra Zaharova & Ilya Plotnikov
Amazing amazing creative direction by Russian artists Alexandra Zaharova & Ilya Plotnikov for Doberman Studio of which they are founders. I can’t enough of it (women in fashion photography involving paper)!

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Video Watch: Acid Drops Featuring Jason Dill

Acid Drops is a breathtakingly exquisite yet simple ongoing animation series by Matt Box that psychedelically captures the individual styles of influential skateboarders.First up is one of my favorite skaters, Jason Dill. Watch the full video in all its technicolor glory after the jump.

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Elaine Reicheck Abandons Painting To Create Embroidery Art

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Elaine Reicheck is a New York-based artist who uses embroidery to explore conceptual and aesthetic ideas in art.  Though she has a background in painting, actually receiving an MFA from Yale in the subject, she began to question her training and wonder what kind of statement she wanted to make with her art.  Though she experimented with knitting wool, hand-paining found photographs and other techniques, embroidery emerged as Reicheck’s material of choice.  She creates beautiful works on linen using needle and thread.

Though she does quite a bit of her work by hand, Reichek  also experiments with computerized sewing.  She doesn’t feel this is a shortcut in anyway, as her work is as much about the concept as it is the end result.

There is also an undoubtedly feminist aspect to Reicheck’s work.  She attributes it to working with so many male painters during her training.  Embroidery, a historically feminine pastime, allows Reichek to explore the same ideas as her male painter counterparts, but, as she says, “if I make them that way, of course their meaning changes, since the meaning of an artwork is always bound with its media and processes and their history.”

Usually selecting a theme to base a series around, Reichek’s latest embroiders consider the myth of Ariadne.  Ariadne gave Theseus a ball of thread with which to retrace his steps allowing him to escape the Minotaur’s labyrinth.  Reichek created art-historical portraits, many of which contain Araidne’s image, and paired them with quotes from literary sources such as Nietzsche or Catullus.

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