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iQ Font

I know what you’re all thinking. Enough with this serious art stuff, right? It IS summer after all. Well here’s something exciting for all of you: the Netherlands division of Toyota recently commissioned a couple lucky typographers, Pierre Smeets & Damien Aresta of Please Let Me Design, to create a typeface made entirely from the movements of a car. The car, driven by professional driver Stef van Campenhoudt was equipped with large colored dots on the roof, which were then tracked with a camera and some software custom written by media artist Zach Lieberman. The result, entitled iQ font, is up for download here.

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Made With Color Presents: Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s Digitally Carved Paintings

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Premier website builder Made With Color and Beautiful/Decay have teamed up again to bring you exclusive artist features. We show you exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create a clean and modern website. But it doesn’t just help artists create a minimal, mobile-responsive website; Made With Color also allows them to do it in only a few minutes without have to know any coding.This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Francisco Alarcon Ruiz.

In Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s work one finds a surprising harmony between nature and technology. Ruiz brings digital techniques such as routers, 3D printers, CAD and animation software and seamlessly blends them with wood and other natural materials to create abstractions that look like a futuristic archeological dig. The surface of each piece is carved and scraped by machines exposing a hyper spectrum of color that was once hidden. Using chance and randomness to his advantage he intentionally adds a method that can potentially add errors. These elements of chance don’t hold his work back. In fact they add a playful element to the work that brings about unique elements that might not otherwise appear. The artist states

‘My work oscillates between contingency and control, visualized through material experiments resulting from new techniques that I develop to negotiate with the representation of abstraction.’

Discover more of Francisco Alarcon Ruiz’s work on his Instagram Account.

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Junk Food Reimagined And Plated As High End Cuisine By “Fake Chef” Jacques La Merde

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Let’s face it no matter how much we learn about the benefits of good nutrition junk food will always remain part of our diet. Even if we’re not eating high calorie high processed food everyday there are times when you ‘just need it’. Nothing beats the crispy crunch of French Fries or a delectably cheesy quesadilla after an exhausting day at work. It makes for a nice comfy meal when you’re just too tired to make something healthy. Then there are those who would rather eat junk food over everything else. Who hasn’t heard a friend say they went to a fancy restaurant and afterwards thought the local diner was better? My mom used to say she liked hamburgers better than steak and I’m sure she still does.

Poking fun at this idea is a project by “fake chef” Jacques La Merde. Under this fictional name, La Merde creates junk food dishes reimagined and plated as high end nouveau cuisine. Through his intepretations we see a Coney Island corn dog broken down into fancy morsels metaphorically selling for $30 a plate. The food is almost unrecognizable from its original state and one has to look very closely to see which junk food staple the artist is recreating. Some of the barely familiar items on view are hostess cupcakes, cheese and crackers, hard boiled eggs, creamsicles, hot pockets, tv dinners, dunkin munchkins and the list goes on.

La Merde displays new creations on an instagram account which currently has 60k followers. Just another testament to the public’s love of all things bad for you disguised as something else. (via escapekit)

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Sara Cwynar’s Photographs Still Lifes Made of Junk

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The exact color of that Ginger Ale can is important to artist Sara Cwynar. Her work revolves around the careful curation of both fantastic and banal objects. She arranges and later photographs these assemblages, which range from color studies to chaotic interpretations of old works of art.

You might be familiar with 16th and 17th century Dutch Flower paintings. If not, then they are exactly as they sound; Still life paintings of flower arrangements. They are colorful and realistically rendered pictures. Their realism is almost boring, until you find out that these paintings were meant to brighten up the interior of homes during the winter months when real flowers were dead. In her Flat Death series, Cwynar took old reproduced pictures of these flowers and overtop placed it with the likes of cheap plastic toys, fake leaves, rolls of tape, and dish gloves.  A sophisticated painting is recreated out of junk, creating a cognitive dissonance.

Color Studies is another still life series. Instead of parodying of an already existing work, Cwynar gathers objects of a similar color. They include old marching band uniforms, encyclopedias, lemons, old slide film, cigarettes, and so much more. Photographs feel really dated, like a teenager’s room in the 1970’s. This is Cwynar’s intention. In an interview with Lavalette, she states:

I thought a lot about the aesthetic patterns you see in these pictures – a particular lighting, a slickness, a high level of detail. I’m also trying to recycle and subvert conventions of product and commercial photography by using elements that aren’t normally associated with these genres – objects that are now discarded or forgotten, intentional scuffing, not glossy at all.

It’s easy to be intrigued by Cwynar’s work. She utilizes conventional objects and through assemblage, allows us to experience them in a new way.

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A 10 Story Adult’s Playground Made From Rubbish Invades Downtown St. Louis

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If you’ve ever been to a children’s playground and wondered why there isn’t anything for adults to enjoy? There’s no doubt that sculptor Bob Cassilly thought this at some stage too. He has built many inventions, installations, art works, statues and public attractions that kids of all ages can play on. His most ambitious project has been in development since 1983, and constantly draws thousands of visitors. The space – called City Museum, in downtown St Louis, Missouri is an “eclectic mixture of children’s playground, funhouse, surrealistic pavilion, and architectural marvel.” (Source) All components of Cassilly’s wonder-world is repurposed and made from reclaimed industrial objects.

Cassilly and his wife at the time, Gail Cassilly purchased a 250,000-square-foot (23,000 m2) complex in downtown St Louis, Missouri. The couple started construction on the area in the mid 90s and opened it up to the public in 1997. Within the complex is a 10 story shoe manufacturing warehouse, which now houses a long list of attractions. It contains 2 airplanes, a firetruck, enchanted caves filled with sculptural stalagmites, a fully functional bar made from marble, an aquarium filled with sharks, rays, sea turtles, snakes and alligators, a skatepark, a circus area, and even a Ferris Wheel on the roof. It is also home to the largest continuous mosaic in America. The complex has even put on music gigs and events.

After the City Museum was deemed a success (it has attracted more than 700,000 visitors since it opened in 1997), Cassilly moved on to another project and started construction on Cementland – in what was an old cement factory. Tragically, Cassilly died in a bulldozer accident while under going work on Cementland in 2011. His vision is continued by a team of 20 or so sculptors affectionately called the Cassilly Crew who manage and add to his existing projects.

Make sure you indulge your inner child at City Museum soon, or at least build your very own playground to enjoy. (Via This Is Colossal)

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Vlad Tenu’s Sculptures Inspired By Patterns In Nature

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Vlad Tenu is an architect and designer based in London whose work is inspired by complex (yet minimal) naturally occurring patterns and spontaneous creation. In his structural series, Synthetic Nature, the Romanian-born artist explore how “the molecular behavior of soap bubbles informs the research method, which involves nature inspired algorithms and geometric constraints.” By utilizing organically-influenced repeating surfaces, which can be reshaped and added onto, his sculptural works could theoretically expand endlessly.

Resembling soap bubbles, honeycombs, seed pods, and other innumerable repeating and interconnecting shapes found in nature, the additive qualities of the work makes their shape completely adaptable, a final form which is limitless. The paradox of Synthetic Nature is that the process, materials and design is all aided or done entirely by computerized systems, thus removing the connection between the influence of organic happenstance and automatic construction. At the same time, the geometries and algorithms that create the work are repeating systems, obeying laws similar to those seen in nature itself.

Synthetic Nature (which is currently on display at London’s Surface_Gallery, through October 18th, 2013) fully explores this connection, parallel and paradox. Tenu, who often replies to the work as a ‘species’ (insinuating a type or categorization) uses more artistic methods, which he combines with his design and architecture background. The artist explains “Synthetic Nature is an instance of my explorative research into spatiality, scale and materiality; all with deep roots in my architectural background. The work has transcended those levels by creating artifacts that are interpretable and adaptable to anything from jewellery, fashion, product design and interiors, architecture to fine art. Algorithmic and geometrical concepts generate surface to volume morphologies that are blurring the boundaries between ‘inside’ and ‘outside’, between ‘solid’ and ‘transparent’ or between ‘natural’ and ‘synthetic’ – blended into abstract hybrid species.” (via design boom)

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Shauna Richardson’s Life-Size Animal Sculptures Created Using Crochet

Shauna Richardson lives and works in the UK. She has coined the term Crochetdermy to describe her process of hand crocheting large animal sculptures. A 19th century art form is employed and specimens are created from scratch rather than being stuffed and mounted. The work puts a handcrafted spin on the art of taxidermy and comments on our relationship with the natural world. Recently she participated in the Lionheart Project in which: “…three giant lions, crocheted by hand by the artist…travelled the UK  in a custom-built, mobile, glass case. These powerful sculptures reflect the region in both symbol and materials.”

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Cris Bruch at Elizabeth Leach Gallery

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Cris Bruch’s work might be found on a more tasteful version of planet Pandora. His shapes have this mysterious, organic quality that I imagine existing on an alien planet populated by giant blue people who are really into saving the environment and stuff. His exhibition at Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Gather and Wait, from July 1st – August 28th explores the artist’s creative process through a series of drawings, photographs of works in progress, and completed sculptures.

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