Get Social:

Jim Bachor Patches Potholes With Colorful Mosaics Of Ice Cream

Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic

Surprising, colorful patches have been appearing on the scarred roadways in Chicago. In an effort to bring art and beauty where once there was neglect and deterioration, artist Jim Bachor embarked on a project to fill potholes with mosaics of ice cream. Named “Treats in the Streets,” each lighthearted piece blends seamlessly into the cracked asphalt. The best part is, as sturdy pieces deriving from an ancient (and enduring) art practice, the mosaics will likely stand up to the test of time. Bachor speaks on his passion for the medium:

Using the same materials, tools and methods of the archaic craftsmen, I create mosaics that speak of modern things in an ancient voice. My work locks into mortar unexpected concepts drawn from the present. By harnessing and exploiting the limitations of this indestructible technique, my work surprises the viewer while challenging long-held notions of what a mosaic should be. Like low-tech pixels, hundreds if not thousands of tiny, hand-cut pieces of Italian glass and marble comprise my work. (Source).

“Treats in the Streets” is also occurring in Finland. In a similar project, Bachor covered potholes with mosaics of flowers. To see me more of his clever and contemporary work, check out Bachor’s website, Facebook, and Instagram.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Treasure Frey

Born into a long bloodline of creatives, illustrator Treasure Frey’s work of collage/ drawings is certainly something to watch for. Her work reminds me a lot of the awesome animations from Monty Python, except with the intricate combination of beautiful mark-making with varying line weights, loops, and brightly colored shapes, she has made a killer style of her own.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Beautiful/Decay Book 1 Release Wrap-Up

artists

Thank you to everyone who came out to the book signing/release party of Book 1! We were lucky to have three of our featured artists, Ben Tegel, David Jien and Kyle Thomas customizing each and every cover of Beautiful/Decay with an original piece of artwork. There were even some collaborative, exquisite corpse style drawings between the three artists! It was great to meet all of the artists, designers and Beautiful/Decay fans that attended. Visit the Beautiful/Decay Flickr page to view photos from the event!

Currently Trending

Jen Mussari

jen03


Jen Mussari is a Pennsylvania native fine artist, illustrator, typographer, and maker of DIY handmade art. She is now at MICA in Baltimore working on her BFA. Check out her new series of hand printed poster series called Very Important Posters, which are a combination of  hand-drawn typography and minimal illustration to communicate varied messages.  These messages range from critical to welcoming, comical to concerned.  You can collect all eight on her ETSY store!

Currently Trending

Battle of the Brush in Bryant Park

Bryant Park, located about a block East of Times Square in Manhattan, has been home to a several fun contemporary/public art projects recently.  Right now, they’re hosting the “Battle of the Brush.”  Which happens to include alumni of the Beautiful/Decay Studio Visits: Alison Blickle and Tom Sanford.   It’s based around the idea of a civil war reenactment, except instead of the North and South, it’s between abstraction and figuration.  Bryant Park was a campground for soldiers during the Civil War, so that’s where the whole Civil War thing comes in.  Personally, I just like the paintings…  It’s coming down this Wednesday, Feb 2nd, so get over there asap.   The show was curated by Corporate Art Solutions.

Currently Trending

Dan Rocca

Love these drawings by Dan Rocca, they remind me of old photocopied punk zines.

Currently Trending

Things That Exist


The Things That Exist from Beautiful/Decay Magazine on Vimeo.

Currently Trending

The Electronic Installations of Alberto Tadiello

The work of Italian artist Alberto Tadiello peeks into the vagaries of technology, nature, and their relationships.  For example, the first five photos of this post depict the installation EPROM (an acronym for Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory).  The installation mounted on the wall consists of music boxes connected to small electric motors, which are in turn connected to transformers.  While the tinny notes of the music boxes may conjure  memories of childhood at first, the motors and music boxes are soon spinning faster than the mechanisms can withstand.  Eventually the motors wear out reducing the ‘music’ to a hardly noticeable noise.  Of this event, the gallery statement says:

“Once the pawls wear out the noise slowly becomes less noticeable and even indistinguishable. The high-speed movement is associated with a sort of cathartic event, which relieves the music box interface from bearing nostalgic feelings.” [via]

Currently Trending