Get Social:

Odeith’s Amazing Anamorphic 3D Graffiti Appears To Miraculously Float In Space

Odeith-Graffiti

Odeith-Graffiti

3d graffiti

3d Graffiti

Lisbon based graffiti artist Odeith has a very specific talent – one he has refined since picking up his first spray can in the mid 1980s. He has a unique way of using only paint on flat walls to create amazing eye-popping 3D effects that seem to float in between surfaces, or jump out from corners. He earned his chops in the 90’s mostly bombing on train tracks and street walls, until he started noticing large scale murals around the place, and wanted to follow suit – to paint something with a message. Slowly his murals began growing more ambitious in size, and more detailed.

Early on, [Odeith] showed a special interest in perspective and shading, in an obscure style, which he later called “sombre 3D”, where the compositions, landscapes or portraits, messages or homages, stood out for their realism and technique. (Source)

After deciding to shut his tattoo parlor in 2008, he dedicated all of his time to graffiti art and eventually gained international recognition, in particular for his optical illusions and anamorphic graffiti. But that’s not to say Odeith is a one trick pony, or only limited to spraying his name with different effects. He also paints large homages and portraits of musicians, actors, politicians, as well as film scenes, commercial billboards, banners for football clubs and murals for Portuguese city halls. He has created artwork for London Shell, Kingsmill, the Coca-Cola Company, Estradas de Portugal, and Samsung.

Odeith talks about his success and having to have confidence in ideas that seem unsuccessful at first:

If [you] want to put your name on top, you need to work, no matter what people say, you need to believe [in] yourself. After years thinking [about] what I could do different[ly] I start[ed] with that crazy anamorphic idea, and it worked well. (Source)

See more of his crazy talent here and here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Movie Time this Wed: Basquiat!

urban_basquiat1

 

We continue our month long series of free outdoor screenings at Space 15 Twenty this Wednesday, May 13th, with “Basquiat.” The screenings are projected on the large outdoor screen located next to the Snack Bar. The movie examines the meteoric rise to art stardom of Basquiat, a young artist renowned for his loose and expressive style- and dating Madonna at the ripe old age of 24! If you’ve never seen this film, Basquiat is the classically Shakespearian figure of the romantic and mysterious tragic-fated artist. The film also continues to explore themes of trends and commodity.

 

Seating is limited so arrive early to secure a chair, but if you get there late, no worries you can always sit on the floor or bring your own chair! Last week we even had a couple of troopers stand and watch the film!

 

Drinks, Snacks and Popcorn are available at Snack Bar!

 

Basquiat- Wed, May 13
8:00pm
Space 15twenty 1520
N. Cahuenga Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90028

 

See more Beautiful/Decay Movie Times for the month of May after the jump!

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Emilio @ Year of the Ox @ GR2

Heres a chance to meet renowned artist (and B/D fave) Emilio this saturday at Giant Robot2 as well as other great artsts at Giant Robot2 on Sawtelle. He will be presenting his latest works as part of the Year of the Ox show. 

 

Currently Trending

The New Beauty: Aleah Chapin’s Unabashed Paintings Of Nude Women

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin‘s oil painting series The Aunties is an intimate, realistic, immodest look at a women’s world, as seen and experienced by a woman. The models featured are actually the artist’s mother’s friends, women who she has grown up with, and with whom she has a personal, unadulterated knowledge of. Chapin hasn’t spared any detail in her oversized portraits – we see the female figure in all of it’s beauty. Breasts are saggy, stomach rolls are bunched up, stretchmarks are on full display, pubic hair untamed and exposed, and thighs are dimpled with fatty cellulite.

Full of tender moments between mother and son, or groups of friends, her work is a strong counterpoint to the idealized and unrealistic female body images we are confronted with daily. She says about the subject:

Most women have issues and I’m not immune to that. We’re told that our bodies are supposed to be a ‘certain height, certain size, certain weight’. But the pictures we see are completely unrealistic; they’re very Photoshopped. We all know it when we look at them in magazines and yet, we still compare ourselves. That’s why we need images that show all sorts of bodies – so we can accept every size and shape. (Source)

Chapin paints women in a playful, relaxed, completely natural state. She tries to capture a childlike spirit, which is in all of us, no matter our age or gender. She says:

We generally care more what we look like – probably too much at times, me included. Young women are still trying to fit in. I think when you get older you care less –that’s not a negative thing at all. You’re just more accepting. When you get past a certain age you become invisible – and that’s a whole other problem. For me, it’s about finding beauty in every imperfection. (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

Currently Trending

Artist Raphael Hefti Turns Gallery Into A 19th Century Metal Factory

Raphael Herti- Sculpture/Performance

Raphael Hefti- Sculpture/Performance

Raphael Hefti- Sculpture/Performance

Raphael Hefti, an artist interested in the factory-like production and performative qualities of art making, puts a twist on ‘land/earth art’ by using sand, iron oxide, aluminum and a 19th century welding process on an enclosed gallery space in London.

His works blur the boundaries between natural/industrial, as he shows new ways of considering the artwork outside of already established narratives, in this case, setting up a foundry (a factory that produces metal castings) in a gallery space, and/or creating a natural process in an industrialized way/setting.

‘Quick Fix Remix’, a performance and exhibition, demonstrates the artist working with the process of ‘thermic welding’, a 19th century industrial process originally devised to weld steel train tracks together. The sand underneath the artist’s feet is composed of iron oxide and aluminum. With the help of both the portable casting vessel (located towards the back of the gallery space) and the artist’s physical labor, the sandy landscape is transformed into an improvised metal casting factory. (via mousse magazine)

“For me the idea of performance is related intimately to the idea of production. Often the situation I work in has its own sense of choreography – from the dunes of a beach to the machinery of a factory floor.”

 

Currently Trending

Allen Brewer

Beautiful drawings from the skillful hand of Minneapolis based illustrator Allen Brewer.

Those are some nice glands.

Currently Trending

“We Met On the Internet” Captures Portraits of Couples Who Found Love Through Online Dating

Sarah and Steve, met in a Yahoo chat room

Sarah and Steve, met in a Yahoo chat room

Linny and Pat, met on Craigslist ‘Missed Connections’

Linny and Pat, met on Craigslist ‘Missed Connections’

Mariela and Tiago, met on Tattoodatingsite.com

Mariela and Tiago, met on Tattoodatingsite.com

Cora and Will, met on Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’

Cora and Will, met on Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’

With so many ways of finding love online, it’s no surprise that nearly one-third of married couples in the United States were introduced this way.  In the series We Met On The Internet, photographer Jena Cumbo teams up with writer Gina Tron to document couples whose love stories started from an encounter on the web. Cumbo photographs the couples in their homes and occasionally out in public, while Tron records their story. You might think of Match.com, OKCupid, eHarmony as the way most people find their mate, but in reality, they meet in a bunch of different and sometimes strange ways. We get a glimpse inside of the lives of couples who took advantage of the matchmaking that the Internet has to offer.

Perhaps one of the more unconventional introductions was between Cora and Will (photo directly above), who met through Craigslist “Free Stuff”. Here’s their story:

Cora and Will met because of a Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’ listing. Will had free movie tickets and Cora was the taker. This was back before Craigslist anonymized responses. In the signature of Will’s email, Cora noticed his website. She clicked on it and discovered he was a talented graphic designer. She was intrigued by his work and they kept in touch, and their friendship turned romantic. They are now married and had a daughter in 2011 and a son earlier this year.

We Met On The Internet is an ongoing series, so if you or someone you know met their partner online, you can contact Cumbo. (Via FeatureShoot)

Currently Trending

Robert Buelteman Scalps, Electrocutes And Paints On Flowers To Create Exquisite Camera-Free Pictures

Robert Buelteman - Photography 9 Robert Buelteman - Photography 7 Robert Buelteman - Photography 3 Robert Buelteman - Photography 4

Flowers and plants glowing in the dark. These pictures are the result of a titanesque work performed on each nature based element by Robert Buelteman. The California based artist is not using anything else than flowers, photographic films, electricity and a fiber-optic probe to create his work. The result is captivating and intriguing.

Robert Buelteman starts his process by picking fresh flowers and plants from a field. He lays them onto a photographic film in darkness after scalping them until they are sheer. He then throws a 80,000 volts current with his car battery, illuminating their unique energy field and exposing the film to their ultraviolet corona.
The artist painstakingly applies the fiber-optic probe, which is the size of a human hair. By tracing over the shapes, some light is reflected, some absorbed, but the light that penetrates the subject exposes the film with the color and form of its’ source. This method requires, for a one successful picture at least 150 tries.

This camera-free, non-digital process only uses the natural and genuine energy of the plants. A statement dear to Robert Buelteman, a former classic photographer, who decided to counteract the growth of digitalized photography by going back to simplicity and craftsmanship. His is attempting to demonstrate that creativity is in the hands of everyone, for the ones that are willing to put the work. And that a piece or art doesn’t need to have a particular meaning. He prefers to let the electrocuted flowers speak for themselves.

Robert Bueltman’s pieces will be displayed at Adler & Co Gallery in San Fransisco until December 28th 2015

Currently Trending