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Andrew Salgado

ecstasy

London based painter Andrew Salgado enjoys focusing on the language of emotion through the male body, and media usage. His paints are generously and passionately applied onto the canvas, as are his explorations through masculinity, identity, sexuality, etc.

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Andy Warhol And Four Other Artists Who Make Art With Balloons

Andy Warhol "Silver Clouds"

Andy Warhol “Silver Clouds”

Choi Jeong Hwa "Life/Life"

Choi Jeong Hwa “Life/Life”

William Forsythe "Scattered Crowd"

William Forsythe “Scattered Crowd”

SpY, "balloon boy"

SpY, “balloon boy”

Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds is probably one of the best-known balloon installations. Silver Clouds was first created with the help of engineer Billy Klüver and incorporated into other works, such as Merce Cunningham’s 1968 Rainforest.  Re-made many times since its first installment, the mercurial piece is a favorite of many.

German choreographer William Forsythe created an amazing installation called Scattered Crowd that consisted of thousands of white balloons.  Seeking to reflect the concept of human decision, Forsythe wanted visitors to consider how they chose to maneuver through the piece.

Madrid-based street artist, SpY has been creating urban interventions for over two decades.  His “balloon boy” is both humorous and surprising.

First created in 1998 and re-created several times Half the Air in a Given Space by Martin Creed is comprised of thousands of balloons.  Always the same color, the installation is mean to be clever, fun and interactive.

South Korean artist Choi Jeong Hwa created an installation called Life/Life, consisting of over 10,000 balloons at Gallery Central in Australia.  The beautiful installation was made all the more powerful for its ephemeral nature.

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Kara Joslyn’s Quietly Emotional Paintings

CCA grad Kara Joslyn is based in Oakland. Joslyn works mostly in black and white and mixed media to create stark, quietly emotional paintings. There’s a lot of hardened dignity in the artist’s work. The black and white depictions here of crumbling stone, ancient pottery, and dried parcels of wood can’t help but lend a resolute seriousness to each painting. This (and their stunning visual qualities) allows them to be taken in with purpose, as though something very special is captured and any time spent with the work is not wasted. By rendering material which was once strong and hard in a state of brokenness and neglect,  Joslyn brings us to considerations of the inevitable effects of neglect and time, and the realization that hardly anything remains prominent forever.

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Beautiful Chinese Landscapes Are Actually Photographs Of Landfills

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You might be asking yourself why Beautiful/Decay is posting images of traditional Chinese Landscapes but if you look just a bit closer you’ll see that in fact these images are highly sophisticated digital manipulations of mounds of garbage and landfills. Yao Lu, the Chinese artist responsible for this brilliantly deceiving body of work begins her process by  photographing mounds of garbage covered in green protective nets which he assembles and reworks by computer to create bucolic images of mountain landscapes shrouded in the mist inspired by traditional Chinese paintings. Lying somewhere between painting and photography, between the past and the present, Yao Lu’s work speaks of the radical mutations affecting nature in China as it is subjected to rampant urbanization and the ecological threats that endanger it. (via)

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Tova Mozard

TovaMozard

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Tova Mozard’s works elicit the uncanny feeling of cinematic conflation and collapse. They’re like stills straight out of dreams you can’t remember, surrealist, hallucinatory, at times slightly comedic in their implausability. They all, somehow, seem to deal with mortality, what lays behind the curtain, absence, death, the supernatural…there is a haunting Lynch-ian tendency that I like too. In particular I love her photo after the jump of Pappy and Harriet’s restaurant, in Joshua Tree…a cheery bbq joint with country bands I have been to many a time…though I almost didn’t recognize it as Mozard makes it look like an ominous place from a horror movie. Many look like lost out-takes from Twin Peaks (she did name her solo exhibition after the Giant’s message  to Agent Cooper….”the owls are not what they seem.”) I also like her ’cause she’s Swedish. Unsettling and seductive.

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Little People In A Big World

I usually wouldn’t describe street art as “sweet” but there is something delicate, nostalgic, and endearing about street artist Slinkachu’s “Little People” project. Started in 2006, Slinkachu paints miniature model train set characters, which he stages and sets in city streets. The works are documented via photographs but Slinkachu views them more as site specific installations. The scenes reflect the loneliness and melancholy that his cast of characters feel from living in the city, where these tiny people are lost and overwhelmed in a world not built for them.

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Gneborg Cleverness

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Recently found Gneborg’s clever, clever photography. Analog constructions and simple visual tricks like oddly photographing 2 people at once look magically digital. They really make the most sense as a series, see what I mean after the jump.

Via Picdit.

 

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Crochet Artist Olek Covers A Homeless Shelter In India With Technicolor Yarn

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Polish artist Olek not only treats her crochet practice as an art form, but also as a catalyst for social change, or at least political and societal commentary. As a part of the St+art Delhi street festival in Delhi, she chose a homeless shelter to decorate with her colorful and energetic woolen pieces. Enlisting the help of fashion design labels in India to not only donate fabric and materials to her community project, but also volunteering helpers, she was able to cover a huge space. Paying homage to India’s infamous textile economy and bright culture, Olek stitches vivid patterns of purples, blues, reds, yellows and oranges together.

She normally recreates anything in stitches that crosses her way – from text messages to medical reports to found objects; she has even covered an entire studio apartment and a life-size dinosaur with her signature crochet. She says of her intention behind her work:

My work changes from place to place. I studied the science of culture. With a miner’s work ethic, I long to delve deeper and deeper into my investigations. My art was a development that took me away from industrial, close-minded Silesia, Poland. It has always sought to bring color and life, energy, and surprise to the living space. I intend to take advantage of living in NYC with various neighborhoods and, with my actions, create a feedback to the economic and social reality in our community. (Source)

Always working with the public in the back of her mind, Olek has produced work in some pretty interesting settings, from Brazil to Brooklyn, and for some interesting causes. For more of her projects, see here. (Via Hi Fructose)

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