Get Social:

ALESSANDRO GALLO’s Animal Human Hybrid Sculptures

Welcome to the world of  London based sculpture Alessandro Gallo where bird people hang out on a ledge, Tattooed lizards chill with a mild case of beer guts, and a cornucopia of creatures read and patiently wait at a bus stop. More manimal hybrids after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

The Thought-Provoking Effects Of Nathan Coley’s Illuminated Text Sculptures In Public Spaces

A Place Beyond Belief (2012) Installation, National Gallery of Kosovo, Pristina. Photo credit: Adthe Mulla.

A Place Beyond Belief (2012). Installation, National Gallery of Kosovo, Pristina. Photo credit: Atdhe Mulla.

We Must Cultivate Our Garden (2006). Installation, Carrall Street, Vancouver. Photo credit: Scott Massey.

We Must Cultivate Our Garden (2006). Installation, Carrall Street, Vancouver. Photo credit: Scott Massey.

You Imagine What You Desire (2014). Installation, Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh. Photo Credit: Keith Hunter.

You Imagine What You Desire (2014). Installation, Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh. Photo credit: Keith Hunter.

There Will Be No Miracles Here (2006). Installation, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. Photo credit: Keith Hunter.

There Will Be No Miracles Here (2006). Installation, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. Photo credit: Keith Hunter.

Nathan Coley is a Glasgow-based artist who is well-known for his inspiring, troubling, and haunting illuminated text sculptures. When they aren’t being featured in a gallery, Coley installs these works in public spaces — in parks, over doorways, and on top of buildings — places where they are visible from afar, or as people walk by on their day-to-day business. The words he chooses derive from both research and personal experience; literature, lyrics, historical documents, and overheard conversations comprise some of his source materials. Many of his installations are directly related to religion or private belief-systems — for example, “Heaven is a place where nothing ever happens,” and “There will be no miracles here.” Others speak to violent experiences in human public life; “Burn the village, feel the warmth” is a reference to the London street riots of 2011.

As human creatures, it is safe to argue that we have a complicated relationship with language. Language is how we make sense of the world, and a way for us to connect with others. But none of us can deny the frustrating limitations we experience with it. We use language to express our innermost fears and desires, yet somehow the words seem inadequate; we can read a line of poetry and be shaken to the core, but remain unable to articulate why. Coley’s works have a similar effect; made of fairground-type globes set in aluminum frames, his sculptures confront us with their bright, almost garish boldness. “There will be no miracles here,” the sign reads, in the middle of a field; the isolated word “here” signifies a sinking stomach, a staggered thought, the unsettling fear that “miracles” are phantasmagoric events residing only in the hearts of the troubled and desperate. Coley’s work affects us on deeply personal and inexpressible levels, adding notes of hope, doubt, and other emotions into our present moment.

Architecture and context play a very important role in Coley’s work, as well. As Lisa Le Feuvre eloquently states in a monograph on Coley’s work:

When Coley pays attention to an architectural landscape it is always constructed through a singular gaze, sometimes directed where the buildings meet the ground as one walks through the streets, other times looking up or down at the buildings designed to stretch up to their full height, like enthusiastic children in a schoolroom, urgently wanting to say their piece. Architecture fulfills and produces desires, perhaps most explicitly seen in places of production, power, worship, and memory. (Source)

As Le Feuvre expresses, there is no doubt that certain (if not all) public spaces have different and powerful effects on us: stroll beneath the arched ceilings of a church and feel humbled; stand in an abandoned park at dusk and sense creeping loneliness. But what Coley also explores is the way power operates in such spaces; who does the public space belong to, and what is our role within it? How do our behaviors and self-conceptions change when we enter those spaces? As Foucault writes in Discipline and Punish, “He who is subjected to a field of visibility, and who knows it, assumes responsibility for the constraints of power; […] he becomes the principle of his own subjection.” If public spaces are indeed “field[s] of visibility” that operate on us via internalized systems of control, than Coley’s integration of art into them is doubly rich for analysis — and also somewhat subversive; the words “We must cultivate our garden,” set atop a hotel in Vancouver, Canada, reinvests local architecture with meaning, transforming our experience of that space from controlled, everyday banality into a new, stimulating process of personal signification: we decide what the “garden” means to us in that particular time and place.

See more of Coley’s works on his website, and check out the rest Le Feuvre’s fascinating essay here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Superoboturbo

superoboturbo 998641257198920

The boombastic Superoboturbo illustrations remind me of how excited I used to be when I saw monkeys on television. I used to be obsessed with those little fuzzy guys, and I’m beginning to swoon for this man’s work the same way. His controlled pallette and friendly line-weight make for a rambunctious duo that make it hard to pull my eyes away.

Also, he recently broke his leg so maybe send him a nice note or a little work to help cheer him up/pay the medical bills at: info@superoboturbo.com

Currently Trending

Adam Hosmer’s Grotesque Digital Drawings

 

Adam Hosmer’s delightfully strange photographs are created by mixing the medium of drawing and photography but with a digital slant. Hosmer starts each image by taking a photograph and then drawing on top of it on the computer. Hundreds of digital lines create hairy deconstructed figures that are coming together, falling apart, and constantly morphing. The results are a strange hybrid of the grotesque and humorous, the digital and analog and formal and experimental.

Currently Trending

Beautifully Lit Heaps Of Trash At Night

Benoit Paille photography1 Benoit Paille photography2

Benoit Paille photography10

There’s something at once lighthearted and sad about Benoit Paillé‘s photographs in the series Jour du Déménagement (translates from French as “Moving Day”).  Discarded furniture, boxes, mattresses and other household items sit in piles waiting to be picked up by the garbage truck.  The photographs are taken in the dark, seemingly in the middle of the night, and the trash lit by a single bulb.  Little attention is paid to garbage on the curb; at night while everyone is sleeping it’s completely forgotten.  Regardless, items we’ve lived with often for years quietly sit there all night.  The scene is reminiscent of food in the refrigerator, and wondering what happens when the door closes and the light goes out.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Acciona

We get sent viral videos and movies to post all the time but at most commercials can be downright borin. That’s NOT the case with this bad boy. It’s beautifully directed and executed and most of all drives home the environmentally friendly/renewable energy message in a clever way. I even like the erie music that comes along. What do you guys think?

Currently Trending

Caverns Carved into Books by Guy Laramee

Guy Laramee sculpture9 Guy Laramee sculpture1

Guy Laramee delicately cuts caverns through the centers of books.  He carves the pages away to reveal caves that seem to be ready to be explored.  His work explores the insides of books in a very literal way.  Indeed, Laramee’s sculptures in way recall the plot of a classic: Journey to the Center of the Earth.  And, in fact, Laramee mentions this book in his statement on the series.  He says:

“Like in Jules Verne’s “Journey to the Center of the Earth”, we seem to be chained to this quest. We “have to” know what lies inside things. But in doing so, we bury ourselves in the “about-ness” of our productions – language, function, etc- all things “about” other things.”

Currently Trending

Pierre-Paul Pariseau

Finally, something I can understand! Pierre-Paul Pariseau creates art for the upper echelon of intellectuals including us interns who are blessed with gigantic brains. Featured in tons of magazines including isthmus, Extra, the Wall Street Journal and I could’ve sworn I saw some of this in the Jefferton Daily Examiner . Hey, can you hang? This shit is on the cusp.

 

Currently Trending