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Scottish Electro-Pop Trio Chvrches

Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry performing at the Echo on March 12, 2013 – Photo by Raymond Lew

You could have blinked and missed getting tickets to this hotly anticipated show by Glasgow’s Chvrches at the Echo in Los Angeles last week. Opening the show was France’s Isaac Delusion who played very danceable music to the early arrivals and Denmark’s Karen Marie Ørsted aka stirring up the crowd with her karate styled dancing and ponytail flipping… yup, I’m obsessed with her… check out the video for Pilgrim to see for yourself.

With a pumped up and lively crowd waiting, Chvrches took the stage and played a tight set starting with one of my favorites, Lies. Since this was only their second show ever in the US, their first being the night before at San Francisco’s The Independent, the excitement level was pretty high throughout the show. Other standout songs was their new single Recover as well as the very catchy, The Mother We Share that ended their short, but sweet set.

Definitely a band to keep an eye on, even with the buzz, they delivered a knock out performance. Check out the video for Lies and remember to act fast when they come back to town because I’m sure it will be another quick sell out. You can pre-order their EP, Recover from iTunes out on March 26th.

 

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Andrei Robu

626_1229367677Designer hailing from Romania explores typographic forms for ESPN Magazine’s X-games preview. I’m personally not into any sports (or just getting away from the keyboard my hands are grafted onto) but I’ll watch it if the intros looked this nice.

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“Global Street Food”

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"Floating market" from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

“Global Street Food” is a show which is currently running at the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. The exhibition is made up of actual structures used by street food vendors around the world. It was curated by German art director Mike Meiré, who writes that it “is dedicated to the fascination with improvised kitchens in public places; urban fast food stations navigating the contrast between pragmatic dilettantism and complexity in the smallest of spaces.”

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Luis Camnitzer’s Witty Conceptual Work

Luis Camnitzer - photograph

Luis Camnitzer  - photograph

Luis Camnitzer  - sculpture

Luis Camnitzer is a German-born Uruguayan artist who currently lives in New York.  A conceptual artist, working mainly in printmaking, sculpture and installation, Camnitzer’s work explores subjects such as social injustice, repression and institutional critique.  His work is often witty, if not biting, and generally has political undertones punctuated by the use of language.

With beginnings in the Conceptual tradition of the 1960s and 70s, much of Camnitzer’s earlier works are text-based.  Though he has lived in New York for many years, Camnitzer’s work also deals largely with ideas tied to his native homeland.  His Uruguayan Torture Series from the early 80s demonstrate his interest in social and political issues regarding an individual in society.  Camnitzer juxtaposes images with text containing connotations of violence.  Subtle, Camnitzer leaves the viewer to decide his or her role as a spectator to the “disappeared” in Latin America.  Leftovers, 1970, consists of several boxes stacked against a gallery wall.  Each individually bandaged and stained with red paint, the word “leftovers” is stenciled on the sides.  The piece evokes the idea of dismembered body parts and the work as a whole represents the political turbulence and violence that was happening in Uruguay and other Latin American countries during that time.

Some have written about Camnitzer’s work as a kind of poetry whereby Camnitzer has explored the way words function visually rather than verbally.  Though Camnitzer denies this interpretation, there is an undoubted rhythm to his work that feels like prose with or without the inclusion of text.  His 2001-02 installation of real books cemented into place feels completely lyrical in nature.  The books are fortified in place, protected for all time.  This piece embodies the part pessimistic, part romantic aspect that runs through much of Camnitzer’s work.

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Famous Paintings Photoshopped Like Modern Fashion Models

gif_565x396_21efa2Titian, Danaë With Eros, 1544gif_565x362_fed333Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1486gif_565x313_698da2Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Grande Odalisque, 1814gif_565x558_b68f2aRaphael, Three Graces, 1504–1505

Unfortunately, today’s media offers a limiting vision of female beauty, urging all women to have slender waists and full chests. Bodies that deviate from this standard are tossed by the wayside by publishers and media giants, photoshopped into figures that conform to an often impossible ideal. But it wasn’t always like this; Baroque painters like Titian and Peter Paul Rubens idealized fuller figures, imagining their nudes with sensuous curves of the flesh.

Lauren Wade, a senior photo editor for Take Part, has seen firsthand the digital nipping and tucking that goes on behind the scenes in the publishing and entertainment industry. In response to the societal obsession with “perfect,” unrealistic female bodies, Wade has digitally altered Renaissance, Modernist, and Post-Impressionist masterpieces to mimic the ways in which fashion models and celebrities are edited today. By releasing a series of gifs showing the extreme lengths to which industry standards alter the human form, she hopes to bring awareness to the fact that what we see in the magazines is entirely unrealistic and to remind us that “beauty” comes in all shapes and sizes.

Here, the female subjects of Paul Gauguin and Edgar Degas, once considered to be idealized, get uncomfortably slim waists and oversized breasts. Raphael’s three graces, once representing the characteristics of female perfection— charm, beauty, and creativity— are also cruelly altered. The goddess of beauty herself, Botticelli’s Venus, doesn’t conform to 21st century societal standards, and she too is deeply changed. Even Titian’s Cupid gets a makeover. Wade’s work reminds us that definitions of “beauty” are in constant flux; as the centuries pass, we set one arbitrary ideal before another. In the end, aren’t all figures lovely and worthy of artistic representation? (via Design Boom)

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Dima Rebus

The illustrations of young Russian artist Dima Rebus may not be in-your-face flashy or neon bright, but they are bright in a different way. Less is more in these cases, as he inserts subtle humor into just about every piece he makes. He imagines a world in which handcuffed delinquents enjoy a spot of tea before their booking and where the riot police cavort with rioters in the streets – and any art that lets me use words like ‘cavort’ when talking about it, well, it’s alright by me.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Light Bulb Music

Not sure if I would categorize Michael Vorfeld’s performance as “music” but it’s an interesting installation incorporating sound & light.

On another note It might be taboo to say this but I find it hard for myself to get into noise art or noise music in general. What do you guys think? Is noise just noise or more?

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Winston Chmielinski

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New York – based painter, Winston Chmielinski creates an incredibly striking collection of work that may appear a little washed out, but, oddly enough, works to contribute to the powerful execution.

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