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The Fashion Illustrations of Floyd Grey

Floyd Grey is a fashion illustrator from Kuala Lumpur who is able to draw both from the realms of the real as well as the fantastic. His light lines of proportion sometimes give way for big-eyed girls holding daggers and dressed for adventure. However, his traditional pen and ink renderings [which I assume are done digitally] of beautiful women in designer clothes are his real expertise. The truth is in the eyes of each one of his figures, since they are illustrated in such a gorgeous way that I’m sure it makes the actual models blush every time they see them.

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Meg Adamson

Portland artist Meg Adamson’s work is delicate without coming off as forced or mechanical. This dynamic reflects her natural, organic subject matter very well. She is participating in PangeaSeed’s Great Artist Migration benefit tour, which begins in July.

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Pixelated Portraits Hand Painted In Watercolor

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Nathan Manire‘s work may seem more akin to printing than painting.  These water color on paper pieces pleasantly blend digital and handmade imagery.  The bleeding and absorption of paint into the grain of the paper reveals the passing of an artist’s hand.  However, the paintings refer to the pixelized image.  In a strange way, stepping back from each painting seems to reveal more detail, while stepping forward again turns the piece into a nearly abstract work.  His skillful painting has won him high profile clients such as Nike, Wired magazine, and Cosmopolitan magazine.

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Remedios Varos AT Frey Norris

It’s not often that we post about deceased artists but a show about the imaginatvie and bizarre work of surrealist Remedios Varo merits a mention.

The first exhibition of Remedios Varo to ever take place in the western United States, Indelible Fables at Frey Norris illuminates the ever-imaginative and prescient world of this deceased surrealist artist. Spanish born Varo certainly died prematurely, by heart-attack in 1963, but in a short career she had acquired a cult-like following among friends in Mexico City, her adopted home. Many of these friends were involved in an informal investigation into esoteric religion and the teachings of George Ivanovich Gurdjieff and his student Peter Ouspensky. As part of this soteriological pursuit, with close friend, the celebrated English artist Leonora Carrington, Varo created some of the most inventive painted scenarios of any of the artists associated with surrealism. Varo would remain something of a marginalized, but popular figure in Latin American art right through the 1990’s, when a solo exhibition at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC elevated global awareness of her work and in part catalyzed an ever accelerating level of scholarship and market demand. View the show at Frey Norris from January 19th-February 25th.

 

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Unseen Art: A Revolutionary Project Allowing The Blind To Experience Classic Works Of Art For The First Time

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We live in a visual culture. Our daily ability to understand cultural references and have collective visual experiences shapes our discourse with our greater surrounding. Imagine never knowing what the mystery smile of the Mona Lisa looks like, or not being able to experience any work of art at all with out being told what it looks like. Imagine never being able to experience on your own how a piece of art makes you feel. For millions of blind people over the world, that is an everyday reality. Unseen Art, a project creating 3D models of master artworks, will change the art experience for the blind forever. With the help of resources from all over the world, the Unseen Art team is gathering information in order to create 3D documents of classic works, such as the Mona Lisa, to be printed in 3D form. Even better, the project is sharing these models for free, making sure that their information can be accessed anywhere in the world there is an 3D printer. Through the collaboration of 3D technicians, artists, and the visually impaired, the project has started to become a reality. With a little help, the project will be able to launch major gallery shows, create a 3D art community to constantly improve the project, and, ultimately, make art more accessible than ever.

“It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries,” states Eija-Liisa, the cultural director of The Blind Federation of Finland.

Please check out more information on Unseen Art here. Please support the project by donating here.

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Anja Rubin Reflects On Technology’s Influence On Society

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Although Anja Rubin’s work is informed by current sociopolitical issues and technology, the process of her painting refers back to older traditions. In a series of pictures done in acrylic and perm enamel she references techniques found in pointillism and expressionism with a twist. The idiosyncrasy at hand hints at graffiti and muraling. These wonderful pictures provoke mind expanding color as Rubin’s palette swirls through the canvas like a million and one white noise dots from an analog tv.  Camouflaged within the loosely formed shapes are socio-political figures and symbols which make them relevant and engaging.
In a series called “Digital” Rubin moves with the times and partakes in computer rendering. Using photoshop, she takes a literal look inside a circuit board and uses its structure as background to study man’s relationship to technology in a metaphorical and societal sense. Her palette remains luminous and proves that a painter can be productive with technological advances. The pictures consist of every day scenes to cerebral symbolism which is cleverly enhanced atop a light box.
Her most recent body of work examines the current state of social media through “selfie” portraits. These large paintings consisting of oversized pixellated dots emphasize both the self-deprecating nature and our obsession with being seen. They reference both Alex Katz and Chuck Close proving Rubin’s versatility as an artist who likes to engage with different processes to achieve her overall goal of keeping record of technology’s influence on society.

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Ashley Oubré’s Hyperrealistic Paintings Explore Social Hardship And The Human Condition

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Ashley Oubré is a self-taught artist from Washington, DC, who paints large-scale images that could easily be mistaken for photographs. Using graphite powder, India ink, and carbon pencil, she masterfully creates dramatic contrasts and realistic textures. The human subject is explored widely throughout her work, often portrayed in soul-searching states of vulnerability and contemplation. She also has a fascinating jellyfish series, in which she perfectly captures the invertebrates’ translucent bodies and trailing, ghost-like movements. Each of her works is marked by an accuracy that subtly transcends the boundaries of reality, drawing the viewer’s attention to the beauty of form by accentuating the details.

In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, Oubré described herself as an “artist who paints (my view of) the human condition.” A tangible presence surrounds her portraits. Drawn to subjects who have endured social hardships, Oubré’s grayscale style sensitively portrays the physical nuances of pain and rejection. Despite their defeated poses, the figures resonate with an honest and unwavering strength. By evoking powerful emotions in the viewer, Oubré’s work enacts a form of healing and empowerment through representation.

Visit Oubré’s website, Tumblr, and Instagram to learn more. She is represented by The Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami.

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Interactive Installation Allows Viewers To Create, Shape, And Color The Sky

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CLOUD PINK @ Savina Gallery from everyware.kr on Vimeo.

Korean artist group Everyware (Hynwoo Bang and Yunsil Heo) recreates the sky and its clouds as part of an interactive installation on the ceiling of a Korean exhibition space, the Savina Gallery.

Cloud Pink, a multi-media project, serves a pseudo sky pool in which you can touch and interact with the color, shapes and sizes of clouds. The work is composed of a fabric screen, and an interactive software; the two work together to create a believable yet whimsical recreation of the clouds on the sky.

“Today, I visualize my colorful cloud of words right in front of your eyes. Touch the pink clouds drifting on a giant fabric screen, reminisce your childhood clouds of dreams. I spent countless sleepless nights just to realize my unproductive and only romantic cloud of words. But, isn’t it nice if we could feel the clouds at our fingertips?”

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