Get Social:

The Awkward Tension And Beauty Of Natalie Krick’s Mother

 

Powerful photographs by Natalie Krick of her mother.

“The colorful seductive nature of cosmetics act to mask, conceal and deceive while drawing attention to the surface and the superficial. By emphasizing both the facade of glamour and the physicality of the body I am interested in what can be revealed through these surfaces.

In this collection of photographs of my mother she performs certain tropes used to visualize female beauty and sexuality. This act is further complicated as her appearance and gestures fluctuate between my overt stylized ideals and her own physical body. These photographs expose an awkwardness and tension in being looked at and scrutinized while also implying a longing to be seen as desirable and beautiful. By creating images that can be perceived as both garish and seductive, I question the fantasy of idealized beauty and what culture designates as flattering and desirable.” (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Robert Montgomery’s Conceptual And Poetic Public Art

Robert Montgomery - Public Art Robert Montgomery - Public Art
Robert Montgomery - Public Art

Jean Cocteau once said,”a poet doesn’t invent, he listens.”

The pieces built by self-proclaimed “melancholic post-situationist” artist Robert Montgomery, likewise, work as interesting dreamy receivers or lightning rods, absorbing bursts of humanity’s collective subconscious in relation to varying environments.

Translating frequencies and teetering between genres, Montgomery, in Interview Magazine asserts, “Obviously my own work comes from a conceptual art tradition, but I love the graffiti artists, and I feel spiritually closer to them than to most contemporary art; they make the city a free space of diverse voices and we shouldn’t get all cynical about them just because Banksy made some money.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

The Timeless Lines Of Mid-Century Modern Design

Screen Shot 2014-10-09 at 8.21.01 PM
bathroom_collection_roycroft_master_suite_1

RICHARD-NEUTRA7 M_Rem_ShowerTrimDetail_100
DXV by American Standard is a landmark product line that represents the company’s storied history spanning 150 years. The collection spans four broad movements: Classic (1880 – 1920), Golden Era (1920 – 1950), Modern (1950 – 1990), and Contemporary (1990 – today).  Each piece in the carefully curated collection harkens back to the era it was inspired by and combines it with modern sensibilities, technology and performance. Although each fixture is inspired by a distinct era, the entire collection has a dialogue and the ability to cross over and create a remix of eras in one space.

DXV’s Modern Collection spans some of the most inspiring eras in American architecture and industrial design. Mid Century Modern architecture and design of the 1950’s and 60’s is as celebrated today, as it was the first time around. You can see the the echoes of Mid-Century design in the pieces from DXV’s modern collection like the sleek lines of the Roycroft collection’s faucets and shower fixture. The Rem collection features Dutch-inspired, artistic curves merged with thoughtful utility- a marriage of form and function. Each piece in the Modern Collection is a study in form, function, and beauty.

Currently Trending

Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

Maico Akiba sculpture4 Maico Akiba sculpture11

Maico Akiba sculpture7

The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

Currently Trending

Colorful Photos Tell The Story Of Motherhood, Fertility And Femininity In Democratic Republic Of The Congo

I am Walé Respect Me

I am Walé Respect Me

I am Walé Respect Me I am Walé Respect Me

Photographer Patrick Willocq grew up in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its culture has shaped his work as an adult. In the series I am Walé Respect Me, Willocq provides us with a peek into tribal traditions that are still practiced in the DR Congo. These particular photographs create a narrative that portrays the stories of primiparous (first-time) nursing mothers. They are colorful scenes featuring compositions that are set like a stage, as we see objects hanging from a not-so-invisible string. Willocq speaks more about his images that blend the truth with the fantastical:

I’ve always been fascinated by native tribes because I feel they have a wealth that we have somehow lost. To document this beautiful tribute to motherhood, fertility and femininity, I proposed to some Walés to participate in staged photographs. Each set-up worked as a visual representation of one of the subjects that the Walé would sing about on the day of her release from seclusion. On that day, she sings the story of her own loneliness, and with humor praises her own behavior while discrediting her Walé rivals. (Via Juxtapoz)

 

Currently Trending

Paper Sculptures Of 80s And 90s Nostalgia

Paper Sculptures 12

zimzou Paper Sculptures

zimzousculpture5

Zim & Zou are a French design studio created by Thibault Zimmermann and Lucie Thomas. In addition to paper sculptures, they also explore graphic design, illustration, and installation work. Rather than use a computer, the duo prefer to use paper to design and sculpt many of their images before photographing them. From a series entitled “Back to Basics,” these brightly sculpted electronic devices represent 80s and 90s nostalgia and employ color schemes that remind me of the Nickelodeon shows I grew up watching. Each item is meticulously sculpted to real-life size and shape dimensions and includes thoughtful details that give the appearance of full functionality. The use of paper to recreate outdated technological objects also confronts the current modern tension between print and digital media.

The duo told Don’t Panic, “…[A]t first sight it’s a tribute to vintage technologies which marked the technological evolution of the last years, and all the nostalgia of the memories that each have with them. By bringing those ‘dead’ objects back to life, we tried to highlight the very fast evolution of our everyday objects. The devices we use nowadays will, in a few years, be considered as relics too. We wanted to ask a question as well: where will this evolution lead us to?

What inspired us personally for this project are the original objects themselves. Every day we use some of those objects, such as the Polaroid camera and we often play Tetris on the original grey Gameboy.”

Their website has a gallery full of other paper sculpture designs, including paper birds, food, spaceships, and a Higgs Boson. You can watch a time-lapse video of their construction process here. (via unknown editors)

Currently Trending

Malin Gabriella Nordin’s Slight Structures

Malin Gabriella Nordin lives and works in Bergen, Norway. She creates subtle compositions in multiple media with a focus on modest shapes. Natural and manmade textures are sourced and assembled to compose elegant collages. These collages then inform her sculptures that are as meek as they are monumental. 

Currently Trending

Jennifer Loeber Photographs Her Dead Mother’s Belongings To Cope With Her Grief

loeber-photo1

loeber-photo8

loeber-photo10

loeber-photo2

When photographer Jennifer Loeber’s mother died, Loeber began to photograph her belongs as a way of coping with her grief. She matched her photos with vintage pictures that her father had taken of her mother and posted the pairs on Instagram. The resulting series, “Left Behind,” is a poignant memorial, both deeply personal and universal.

The everyday objects that remain when loved one dies become an instant museum of sorts, freezing that person in time. A favorite pearl ring will never be replaced by a diamond; an unmatched glove will never be matched to its mate. A used lipstick, valueless in itself, becomes a cherished object, chosen and applied by the person so missed. Many times these everyday objects are the most touching and the most difficult to dispose of.

“I found myself deeply overwhelmed by the need to keep even the most mundane of my Mom’s belongings when she died suddenly this past February. Instead of providing comfort and good memories they became a source of deep sadness and anxiety and I knew the only way I would be able to move past that was to focus on a way to interact with them cathartically. I had recently become active on Instagram and realized that utilizing the casual aspects of sharing on the app was a way to diminish my own sentimentality towards the objects my Mom left behind.”

Reframing the objects allowed Loeber to experience them without searing grief. Instead of the items feeling haunted, they became imbued by fond memories of her mother’s life. By matching them with her father’s photos she was able to make a fitting memorial to her mother, one that was less about personal pain than about remembrance.

“My dad refused to hold a traditional funeral service because he and I believe you should celebrate a life, not mourn it. I’m sure this body of work falls in line with that concept.” (Source)

Currently Trending