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NAM

NAM for Digital Temple

Nam is a Japanese graphic art collective established by Takayuki Nakazawa (Graphic Designer) and Hiroshi Manaka (Photographer). This is their special project for Digital Temple magazine.

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Alex Da Corte’s Installations Construct A Creepy, Life-Sized Dollhouse Haunted By Memories And Emotions

Alex Da Corte - Installation

Photo: John Bernardo, courtesy of Luxembourg & Dayan, New York.

Alex Da Corte - Installation

Photo: John Bernardo, courtesy of Luxembourg & Dayan, New York.

Alex Da Corte - Installation

Photo: John Bernardo, courtesy of Luxembourg & Dayan, New York.

Alex Da Corte - Installation

Photo: John Bernardo, courtesy of Luxembourg & Dayan, New York.

Alex Da Corte is a Philadelphia-based installation artist who recently created a “dollhouse” of fragmented memories and rainbow-colored horrors out of Luxembourg & Dayan‘s three-story townhouse in New York. Entitled “Die Hexe” (German for “The Witch”), Da Corte’s work guided the visitor on a hallucinogenic journey through a mash-up of absurdist cultural and historical imagery: a wooden rocking chair with overlapping backs; a section of Nicolas Poussin’s Midas and Bacchus beside a coffee shaped like a bondage-clad stripper; and a dove sitting atop a pair of goaltender masks reminiscent of Friday the 13th’s Jason.

The experience went something like this: a drain by Robert Gober was viewed through a peephole in the foyer. From there on, the visitor passed through a series of rooms and hallways filled with seemingly disconnected artifacts — from the mundane, to the absurd, to works of art by Haim Steinbach (who created the “framing devices”, or shelves) and Bjarne Melgaard (the stripper coffee table) (Source). The final room featured green tiles nauseatingly reminiscent of the place where Kurt Cobain shot himself. By overwhelming the visitor with strange imagery that haunts the imagination on an almost subconscious level, “Die Hexe” evoked a variety of emotions and sensations: fear, repulsion, delight, and desire.

Da Corte’s rooms drew on more personal memories, as well. As Luxembourg & Dayan’s press release reveals, “Die Hexe” included “a pantry smelling of spices and filled with anonymous products,” recalling the artist’s grandfathers, who both “worked along the food supply chain” (Source). Elsewhere, Da Corte has transferred childhood emotions into objects remindful of his grandmother’s house, including “craft-based décor such as woven rugs, quilt patterns, and wreathes.” Such intimate artifacts, when coupled with dislocated bits of cultural imagery, express identity as a patchwork, one that repeatedly falls apart and is sewn together again by memories and emotion.

While “Die Hexe” ended April 11th, you are not out of luck; Da Corte will be opening his first museum solo exhibition at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in March 2016. For more pictures and thoughts on “Die Hexe,” check out Hi-Fructose’s fascinating summary, as well as this insightful article on artnet News. (Via Hi-Fructose).

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Ben Krasnow Shows Us What A Record Player Needle Does Under An Electron Microscope

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Applied Science wiz Ben Krasnow conducted a series of tests to capture how information is disseminated on vinyl record, dvd, and cd rom. What he found was that the grooves of each device is shaped differently sending out unique signals. In the vinyl study Krasnow added a metallic surface to pieces of the waxy substance and allowed the electron microscope to pick up and photograph the action. In a magnified state vinyl looks similar to a used paper towel. The movement is recorded at 1/400th of actual speed. Under the magnification the needle looked like a pencil making arrow marks.The friction created over the tiny shapes is eventually translated into sound.

With a DVD Krasnow split apart the disc to locate the coded aluminum material. This was seen under the microscope as little dashes similar to morse code. In order to make gifs the scientist then took the material and downloaded it into photoshop. These resembled old super 8 movies.

Krasnow currently works at Google. He is best known for inventing keyboards, mice and joysticks for MRI machines. He sold these to academic institutions who in turn wrote about their use in science journals. (via demilked)

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Dan Olsen

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Ohio-born and based artist Dan Olsen works with multiple mediums ranging from ballpoint-pen drawings to mixed media installations to stop motion animation. I particularly like the drawings, which recycle images from pop culture into freaky teenage collages. Note: the above image, entitled Weed Dogs, was a collaboration with fellow illustrator Grant LaValley.

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Francesca Dimattio’s Mystical Cracked Ceramic Sculptures

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When you first witness Francesca Dimattio’s work you forget post-modernism and pummel head long into post-apocalyptic armageddon. Strongly resembling totems ingrained with furniture design, their melting quality give off surreal messages but ultimately speak to something totally present. There’s a mystical side to their nature akin to religious artifacts. A link to the distant past where certain angles become figurative channeling idols you might come across on a hike through an enchanted forest. Their formal aesthetic fuses pieces of ceramic together and creates organic patterns that zig zag through collage-like patches of cracked elegance. The tiny shards of porcelain build a narrative out of tea cups and plates a metaphor to the memories of one life lived.

The unusual technique Dimattio uses eventually manifests into porcelain-laden structures which ultimately resemble chairs and chandeliers. These account for the title “Domestic Sculpture” her latest exhibition at Salon 94 in NYC. Dimattio’s history in painting comes across when viewing these magnificent pieces in person. Up close the work has a thick impastoed paint quality which make them come alive in another sense. Whereas her paintings referenced architecture and collage, her sculptures embrace all of the above including ceramic traditions.

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Best of 2011: Jo Hamilton’s Crochet Heads

It’s not everyday that we post an artist who works with yarn but Jo Hamilton’s crochet portraits are really interesting. I’m really happy that Jo decided to not over finish these and left them without a background and with the yarn hanging down. Sort of looks like paint drips and adds another dimension to the work that you don’t see often in crochet.

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HEATHER BENJAMIN’s Sad Sex Comics – NSFW

Jesus. Heather Benjamin is one wild chick.

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Dimitri Karakostas

Dimitri Karakostas is a hard working photographer from Toronto, Canada. He’s made a whole pile of new work since we last checked in. His sometimes beautiful, sometimes beautifully garish images are the result of his dedication to the analog medium. Rejecting common digital editing has opened his work to a whole world of great tactile manipulations and experimentation, techniques often overlooked by other young photographers.

And hey, Dimitri also co-founded Blood of the Young Zine in ’08. Its a great project aimed at promoting and publishing new photographers, creatives, and troublemakers. If you’re in Toronto until Dec. 10th make sure to check out his work in the Dying Breed group exhibition at 285 Dundas W. This Canadian doesn’t quit!

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