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DANIEL BEJAR/DESTROYER (THE GOOGLEGÄNGER)

What would you do if you found out someone has the same name as you? And you find out via Google image search that maybe they kinda look like you, too? Oh, and this other person just happens to be a (sorta well known) musician? You can do what multi-disciplinary arist Daniel Bejar is doing: Re-stage photos of musician Daniel Bejar (of Destroyer fame) culled from Google’s image search engine and post them on your own site — thegooglegänger.com — along with some fan mail you may occasionally receive by accident.

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Heikki Leis’ Beautifully Decayed Photographs

It should come as no surprise that we love a bit of decay in anything beautiful and Heikki Leis’ gorgeously lit  series Afterlife is the perfect marriage of the two. His photos of rotting food and  macro zooms of mold and decay have enough beauty and decay for the most diehard Cult Of Decay member.  Long live Beautiful Decay!

 

Ps. thanks to Christopher at Colossal for the link!)

 

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Ron van der Ende’s Wood Scrap Sculptures

You don’t want to eat that, trust me. Each of these sculptural creations is made up of equal parts reclaimed wood, time, and toil. These handcrafted wall mounted bas reliefs are the speciality of Ron van der Ende, an artist based out of Rotterdam, The Netherlands. So barring a peculiar taste for splinters, don’t chomp on that meaty morsel. Do, however, take a closer look at these works after the jump.

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Young-Deok Seo’s Inventive Bike Chain Sculptures

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Young-Deok Seo uses the human figure as the core of his work, though material is an ever present, and surprisingly inventive, concern. Using bought and discarded bicycle chains, the young South Korean artist spends months constructing and welding his pieces, with larger pieces taking even longer. Although the majority of his intricate constructions are manifested through the human form, there is an ever-present emotional quality present, oftentimes that of hurt and loss. While some figures physiques are the pinnacle of human perfection, others are faceless, in positions of mourning, or shattered upon the gallery floor. The viewer can easily make the assumption that the links Seo uses go past material and into metaphor, connecting chains to our manufactured, and fractured, world.

The artist explains, “We get to deal with lots of relationships in our fiercely competitive society. And from those relationships, we get desire for materials.To portray the mankind as a being which are bound to many things around them, I use the material that is also bound and also connected to each other….material restrict and choke each other.Modern people’s addiction to the material can be stood up as a main theme, in this way.” (via myampgoesto11)

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Keith Lemley’s Eerie, Neon Ax Installation Explores Memories Of The Forest

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Keith Lemley is an American artist who builds sculptural, light-based installations that explore the crossroads between nature and technology. Featured here is “The Woods,” comprising a dimly-lit room with illuminated axes lain against chopping logs and cracked cement walls. The scene is eerie yet serene, mixing bright-light modernity with the dark, cobwebbed corners of rustic life. The lights bring a sense of warmth and presence where there is otherwise cold stillness, calling upon our own memories of the forest while also estranging them with urban glamor. In the following statement, Lemley describes his desire to transcend time and environmental boundaries:

“My work is about seeing the unseen—the invisible presence which exists in our minds and surrounds all objects, experiences, and memories. Working in my studio in rural Appalachia, I have developed a keen interest in being part of and observing natural systems, time and the process of life and death, and an aesthetic sensibility synthesizing the organic and the machine.” (Source)

Other works by Lemley similarly explore the beauty of the natural world, manifesting it beyond normative representations; “Arboreal” is a speculation on the geometry inherent in nature, whereas “Past Presence” uses light to enhance the ragged dynamism of driftwood. Lemley’s goal is to shift our perspectives on the environment, and he does so by fulfilling the adventurous spirit and infusing physical images with the resonance of personal experience. Lemley’s installations renew familiar landscapes with meaning and excitement; as he writes, “one [ultimately] walks away more self aware and delighted in everyday visual ephemera and the experience of being a living, breathing being” (Source).

Visit Lemley’s website to view more. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Help B/D Pick a Theme!

In case you haven’t heard, the new, limited edition book-format B/D will be specially themed moving forward! Each issue will cohesively incorporate a chosen theme within all aspects of the book– from editorial, to featured artists, to the design and layout of the mag itself.

Here’s the best part: we wanted to open up the forum to all of you devoted readers! If we pick yours, we will send you one of our new books with your theme free of charge!

Some ideas us here at B/D have come up with are “Art & Commerce,” “Digital Domains,” “Rules are Made to be Broken,” to name a few. The themes you choose should be open enough to encapsulate a wide variety of contemporary expressions, but no so loose that just about anything could go into it. Examples of things that are too loosy goosy: “Figurative Painting,” “Artists of 2009,” “Skulls,” things that are way too specific: “Artists that use root beer as paint,” “Performance art in Central Park,” “Guys that incorporate mustaches into their imagery.”

You get the idea- so send away, we’re excited to hear from you! Please leave your ideas for book themes in the comments section of this post.

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Tom Phillips’ “A Humument”: An Ongoing Transformation From Forgotten Victorian Text To Colorfully Illustrated Digital Oracle

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British artist Tom Phillips released the first edition of A Humument in 1970. To create this stunning book, Phillips illustrated and/or collaged each page of a found Victorian text – WH Mallock’s A Human Document – leaving parts of the original text exposed and uncovering a new story line with a new protagonist named Bill Toge, whose name appears only when the word “together” or “altogether” appears in Mallock’s original text. Of the text and his project, Phillips says,”It is a forgotten Victorian novel found by chance …I plundered, mined, and undermined its text to make it yield the ghosts of other possible stories, scenes, poems, erotic incidents, and surrealist catastrophes which seemed to lurk within its wall of words. As I worked on it, I replaced the text I’d stripped away with visual images of all kinds. It began to tell and depict, among other memories, dreams, and reflections, the sad story of Bill Toge, one of love’s casualties.”

Over the years, Phillips has revised and replaced pages of the text, resulting in updated editions. The most recent 5th edition was published in 2012. In 2010, A Humument made its digital debut as an app for the iPad and iPhone. Assisting in its develop, Phillips is very pleased with his work’s transition to the digital realm. For Phillips, a bright screen enhances his illustrations, lending them a glow his pens and paints couldn’t achieve, “almost like church windows at times.” After Phillips started working on the book in the 60s, he dreamed that it could one day be used as an oracle. Forty years of technology later, Phillips’ dream has been realized, and he’s become his own consumer: “Each night after midnight I consult, somewhat furtively (even though alone), the Oracle I have made. I’m often surprised by pages made long ago and almost forgotten, as well as by the sometimes uncanny predictions they offer their maker.” (via the guardian)

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Stacy Kranitz’ Photography Photographs The Rural Underbelly Of An Ohio Skate Park

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Photographer Stacy Kranitz captures a segment of society which is rarely seen by the public eye; the hang out rituals of young, post pubescent males at Skatopia Skate Park in the backwoods of Ohio. Her relationship with a young man named Jerimy, allowed her to document his daily life in these rural parts. Through three mediums: photography, video documentary and ‘zine, Kranitz explores this brutal and interesting world. Her angle is definitely from a woman’s perspective, as she knows how to capture the vulnerability in these faceless people, sometimes engaged in crude acts, that might not be so much in life but definitely is true on film.

The rural environment sets the tone for a road warrior type setting where rough skating, sexual innuendo and violence is suggested. There’s a lot of blood, spit and urine. The photos have a war documentary type vibe, meaning everything is up close and personal. It adds to the car crash scenario of wanting to look away but instead looking closer, allowing your curiosity to take over. Part of Kranitz’ intention is to study the catharsis in violence. Others are capturing youth’s raw vitality. She accomplishes both with these studies.

On Skatopia’s website there’s a section listed as ‘anarchy’. It defines the word from the Greek preface meaning “without rulers; without masters”. It fits in well with the tone of these pictures as the subjects do engage in rituals of freedom. Skate culture has always been associated with rebellion and is a part of society that still perks people’s interest today.

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