Get Social:

Chris Agnew’s Etchings Of Belief Systems

British artist Chris Agnew Predominantly works with drawing and a self-developed technique of etching into panels with oil painted details. Agnew’s practice is focused upon the cultivation of belief systems through legends, mythologies and actual events. The works take the form of intricate and highly-detailed examinations of specific locations where the origin or destiny of particular events are/will be played out.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Inka Järvinen

portraitsm, Inka Jarvinen

Inka Järvinen is an illustrator/designer from Helsinki.  Järvinen works mostly in detailed collage’s, her output is dark, as she draws inspiration from the old sci-fi aesthetic of the future in the 1960’s and 1970’s. I love her illustrations and simple use of color.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Platonov Pavel’s Dark Mystery

Platonov Pavel’s portraits of a figure wearing a ski mask are full of rich psychological mystery and intrigue. They take a basic subject matter and create a complex narrative with just a few elements and well placed use of color.

Currently Trending

Street Artist Curiot Covers Walls Mythical Creatures

 street art7

street art4

El Curiot street art6

Favio Martinez, better known on the street as Curiot, is a street artist based in Mexico City.  His murals and paintings are especially colorful and complex.  Curiot has a well-known and easily distinguishable style.  Strange creatures populate his compositions.  While each creature is definitely alien, Curiot creates them using familiar animal-like components.  Often, these creatures are seen being worshiped by comparably tiny people giving the murals.  In a way, this pulls Curiot’s work out of science fiction and places it more as a meditation and variations on Mexican Culture.  The gallery statement from a recent solo exhibit at FFDG further explains Curiot’s inspiration:

“Curiot’s colorful paintings, featuring mythical half-animal half-human figures and scenes, which allude to Mexican traditions (geometric designs, Day of the Dead styles, myths and legends, tribal elements), are rendered in precise detail with a mixture of highly vibrant yet complementary colors. “Growing up in the States sort of gave me a diluted Mexican culture, I had no clue what I was missing out on until I moved back 10 years ago”, says Curiot. “The bright colors, folklore, ancient cultures and the beautiful handcrafts are some of the things that I embraced and which influence my work deeply”. The 11 new paintings in “Age of Omuktlans” tell the story of man’s distance from his natural path as he focuses his energy on satisfying his material pleasures and the dystopia this creates.”

Currently Trending

Early Stick-and-Poke Prison Tattoos Preserved In Formaldehyde

Prison TattoosPrison Tattoos Prison Tattoos Prison Tattoos

Nowadays, it’s not uncommon to see people with copious amounts of tattoos on their arms, legs, and head. But, it wasn’t that long ago that these permanent adornments were only found on a very specific group of people – prisoners. Tattoos back then were markedly different than their modern counterparts, and some were preserved for posterity in formaldehyde. The tiny pieces of history are an eerie but a fascinating look at the past.

The designs of early tattooing were much simpler than they are today. Instead of the needles we’re familiar with, prisoners would use crude tools like razor blades, broken glass, paper clips, or wires. Ink was substituted for pencil refills, charcoal, watercolor paints, or crayons and mixed with water, fat, or urine.

At the beginning of the 20th century, a study of the prisoners’ tattoos began in the Department of Forensic Medicine at Jagiellonian University, and researchers wanted a way to document their findings. While photography might have been the simpler (and more obvious) solution, prisoners’ tattooed skin was removed and preserved.

The extractions, encased in glass, are small curiosities that don’t really look like tattoos at all. Removed from the context of the body, they are symbols for crimes like burglary, rape, and prostitution. (Via Scribol)

Currently Trending

Raúl Gasque’s Apocalyptic Portrayal Of An Abandoned Land Is Hopeful And Beautiful

Processed with VSCOcam with lv01 preset Processed with VSCOcam with hb2 preset Processed with VSCOcam with lv01 preset

“This spot was once a prosperous place” says Mexican artist Raúl Gasque. “It used to be one of the top commercial shrimp fishing ports in Mexico and now its an abandoned space.” This photography series, Metonymic Tropic, is Gasque’s way of capturing his nostalgia for what was: an affluent port that thrived during a prosperous economy and the rule of prolific leaders.

The decay shown through these images serve as a visual metaphor of an overall state of destruction and crisis. Although apocalyptic and dark, Gasque’s way of juxtaposing decay and bright blue waters or skies gives the composition an alternate uplifting meaning, one he hopes his viewers can somehow find upon careful and willful inspection.

The photos are metaphors of the present time in humanity: ghost towns, crisis, climate change consequences, but in the horizon the blue skies transmit us a way of hope and redemption.

Even in the darkest of photographs in the collection we are able to pinpoint a source of inspiration and beauty. Destruction always call for re-birth and rehabilitation and it is safe to say that through his photographs, Gasque makes a case of nostalgia but most importantly a myriad of observations that may in fact rebuild his faith in something that might return to the way it was.

Currently Trending

Alex Griffin

Alex Griffin sent in his application for initiation into The Cult Of Decay a few weeks back and after some paperwork, secret handshake training, and cult training he has been happily approved. Take a look at Alex’s paintWelcome to the cult Alex!

Currently Trending

Thordis Adalsteinsdottir Male Pattern Baldness

Thordis Adalsteinsdottir‘s paintings combine pattern filled rooms with bizarre narrative scenes that will leave you thinking “what the hell is going on in this guys head?” Out of all the bizarre elements in Thordis’s work my favorite would have to be the hair. It looks like a blindfolded barber took a razor blade to the heads and only left 8 strands.

Currently Trending