Get Social:

Sponsored Video: Ask The Right Questions, Change The World

if we contest if we contest

 

We all want to change the world to make it a better place. That’s why last summer Dassault Systemes asked over 550 thinkers from around the world for submissions of world changing dreams as part of their “If We” contest. Pulled from various social networking venues such as Twitter, Facebook, 3ds.com and an assortment of blogs they received brilliant ideas from every corner of the globe proving that progress and innovation can happen if we simply look and ask for it. From the initial pool of submissions they gathered the top 85 ideas and contacted the authors to get more details about their dreams.The above video sponsored by Dassault is a compilation of the top 10 ideas pulled from those 85 contestants. With so many brilliant, quirky and out of the box ideas it’s hard to choose favorites but one that particularly jumped out at us comes from Geoffrey Cooper from Canada: “IF WE designed a rolling tree planting robot, we could send them out to replant forests and restore deserted lands. Let’s make it happen!”

Join in on the conversation and share your ideas with the world today!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Haunting Photographs Of The Stains Left Behind By Victims Of Murder And Illness

1Seizure, Male, 25 years old 6Illness, Female, 60 years old 4Suicide with Gun, Male, 40 years old 3Heart Attack, Male, 50 years old (II)

The photographer Sarah Sudhoff traces the physical, bodily evidence left by the dead; for her project At the Hour of Our Death, she gives form to death and the unknown, shooting fabrics stained by the blood and fluids of the victims of murder, suicide, and illness. She follows these material reminders of dead, contaminated and removed from the scene, to a warehouse, where they wait to be disposed of; she knows not the names or identies of the dead, constructing strange and poignant narratives with only the colors and shapes left by their passing.

Shot under flood lights, the close-range photographs are rendered with astounding sharpness, resolution, and color. Aided by titles that only reveal the cause of death, gender, and the age of the deceased, the images veer into abstraction; accidental blood splatter mirrors the deliberate marks of abstract expressionist Jackson Pollack. Textured surfaces are saturated with the traces of the body, their delicate floral and lacy doily patterns colored by a permanent, irreversible reminder of our mortality. The empty, untouched space of the fabrics are assigned new meaning; like unfinished portions of a painted canvas, they stand in for the unknowable significance of a life lost.

These photographs force our eye to face the repulsion and terror we feel for the traumatized human body and the dead, transposing our invisible grief and fears onto jarringly beautiful, vividly textured tapestries. These are the physical and tangible marks of passing and loss; these are the quiet reminders of a life that exists no longer, a body that paradoxically cries out for our touch. (via Feature Shoot)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Stefan Benchoam

The above picture is documentation of Stefan Benchoams 2008 installation Ejercicio de Dibujo at the XVI Paiz Biennial in Guatemala City. 

 

Currently Trending

Glen Sorenson’s Night Painting

I like to use the shorthand of “night paintings” to describe Austrian-born, Swedish painter Glen Sorenson’s solemn, melancholic works. He consistently utilizes black backgrounds against a washed out, expertly mixed color palette that consists of pink, lavender, yellow, periwinkle and turquoise hues. A large majority of his work is made up of simplistic still lives of slumped over, crispy, dead flowers; his remaining works depict unconventionally cropped objects and wistful, stagnant scenes . 

Currently Trending

Josh Jefferson’s Raw, Geometric Paintings Of Faces Explore And Unmake Facades Of Identity

Josh Jefferson - Painting Josh Jefferson - Painting Josh Jefferson - Painting Josh Jefferson - Painting

Josh Jefferson is a Boston-based artist who paints and draws raw, coarsely layered, and geometric portraits. Viewing the face as the locus of emotion and individuality — as well as a mask we shape to convey our identities — Jefferson’s rough-yet-sophisticated style allows him to represent the structures of the face while simultaneously exploring the symbolic interiority of each portrait; with loose and boldly-colored brush strokes and layered washes of paint, Jefferson gives each portrait a constructed superficiality as well as a deeper, visible core: translucent shapes become thoughts floating around inside a skull, eyes sink into deep vortexes, and mouths smile and grimace all at once. In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, Jefferson described his style and motivations:

“What really gets me excited is when I see a painting that seems effortless — when an artist has confidence and it appears that the painting came about like one fast whiplash, a slaphappy moment. If I could convey that feeling of loose abandon and control I would be happy. The distortions and geometric interpretations in my drawings and paintings act as structures for me to build on and react to. I kind of need to repeat things to find their meaning, and the structures help with this process.”

Just as our emotions shift, fluctuate, and blend together, Jefferson’s imaginative-yet-structured portraits manifest the complexity of inward experiences — experiences that may seem abstract or unreadable to anyone not enduring them personally. As Jefferson strives for that balance between “abandon and control,” there is a distinct sense of chaos and order, childhood lightness and adult stoicism; shifting between semi-transparent shapes and bold lines, Jefferson’s faces invite and repel us. In showing the imperfections amidst an otherwise bold exterior, the portraits allow us to view identity as a careful construction — a facade — over a complex and vulnerable personal world.

Jefferson’s works will be featured at Head First, an exhibition at the TURN Gallery in New York City running from June 24th until August 16th. The gallery will be hosting the opening reception on the 24th from 6-8pm. Check out Jefferson’s website to see a larger collection of his work.

Currently Trending

Starkly Graceful Black And White Photos Of Icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography9 icebergs

Jan Erik Waider icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography8 icebergs

The photographs of Jan Erik Waider seem to turn natural formations into abstract sculptures.  His series Ice on Black captures icebergs in stark black and white photography.  The textures, movement, and shape of the floating ice is surprisingly sculptural.  The graceful masses of ice juxtaposed against the larger field of open sea nearly seem like a painterly decision.  Waider is a graphic designer by trade, but his passion if for photography and the northern landscape.  He specifically captures the majority of his photographs in and near Greenland and Iceland.

Currently Trending

Preview: Spacegrass, Group Show at Bloom Projects in NYC curated by Chris Bors

 

…These visions were frozen in a time capsule on Gallifrey, only to be unearthed when the time and relative dimension in space felt right. Opened in 2012, the images resembled paintings like Michael Bevilacqua’s layered chrome and black attack, Chris Bors’s post-pop pseudo-propaganda, David Humphrey’s surreal suburban wet dreams, Ketta Ioannidou’s chaotic spiraling vegetation, Todd James’s bright cartoons from our Id, Allison Schulnik’s luscious thick impasto, Aaron Zimmerman intricate fever dreams and Jeremiah Teipen’s psychedelic sexual video.

NYC artistic heavyweight Chris Bors curated Spacegrass, a group show at Bloom Projects in New York (95 East 7th Street, downstairs) opening September 8th. The exhibition features works from a couple B/D favs including Allison Schulnik, Todd James, and Aaron Zimmerman. Check out some preview shots after the jump.

Currently Trending

Futuristic Glowing Orb Creates An Interactive Experience With Light And Sound

anima_iki_01

anima_iki_09 anima_iki_07

Berlin based digital art and design studio, Onformative, has recently installed their newest project, ANIMA iki, an “immersive experience of light and sound.” The installation is made up of a large glowing sphere that spans two meters in diameter and is suspended from the ceiling in a dark room. The orb is lit up by a visual aimed to mimic a “viscous metallic fluid” that’s hue and tonality shift and become distorted, creating a futuristic, mysterious aura. The “glow” within the sphere is created from a powerful wide angle projector that uses a fish eye lens and can create 360 degrees images. By manipulating the audible frequencies, the installation is able to “respond” to the space though picking up and reverberating the sound back. ANIMA iki is able to create visual and sounds in real time by responding to a Kinect tracking system that has the ability assess movement within its atmosphere.  As the orb has a complex interaction with light and sound, the installation is able to seem alive. The orb seems to be able to have a personal interaction with the viewer, creating a strange, interesting experience.

Founded in 2010 by Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, Onformative offers a space they describe as “guided by an emotional approach, we constantly search for new forms of creative expression. Through an experimental practice we create meaningful works to challenge the boundaries between art, design and technology.”

The work was originally commissioned for the Amsterdam Dance Event and has since been exhibited at various galleries in the Netherlands and Germany. 

Currently Trending