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Jaimie Warren’s Playful Pop Culture Selfies Subvert The Form’s Perceived Vanity

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as Yoda in L'admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Self-portrait as Yoda in L’admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Selfies are a ubiquitous mode of self-expression. Photographer and performance artist Jaimie Warren integrates pop culture. humor, and a bright color palette to create visually striking self-portraits that are absurd, humorous, and campy. In one photo series, Warren becomes celebrity-food characters, fusing their names into an offbeat expression. In another, she re-creates images from art history, embellishing them with her signature pop culture camp style. Warren’s selfies subvert the form of traditional portraiture by using absurdity and grotesqueness to supplant the selfie’s identification with vanity. In addition to her individual projects, Warren also co-directs an internationally touring “faux-cable access show” called Whoop Dee Doo, a nonprofit that partners with youth organizations to introduce kids to wonderfully strange art that is meaningful, fun, and compelling. (via la monda and vice)

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Jeremy Blincoe

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Photographer Jeremy Blincoe works & lives in Melbourne. His series entitled Wander & Wonder is currently featured at the Lindberg Galleries. These fantastic images bring to mind, perhaps, the more innocent side of adult tales such as Alice in Wonderland or Huckleberry Finn – just before that darker something sets in, where pure curiosity still survives with wide eyes.

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Eric Valli’s Honey Hunters

High in the Himalayan foothills, fearless Gurung men risk their lives to harvest the massive nests of the worlds largest honeybee. Photographer Eric Valli tagged along to document one of the most dangers jobs that is just business as usual to the people who live in the Himalayas. (via)

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Studio Visit: Sandeep Mukherjee’s Abstract Visions of Topography

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Sandeep Mukherjee. See the full studio visit and interview with Sandeep and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Klea and I visited Sandeep at Pomona College in Claremont, a small town about 30 miles east from downtown Los Angeles. Sandeep lives in LA, but as an Assistant Professor of Art he’s been provided with a studio on campus (lucky him!). After getting a bit lost and stopping for a quick lunch at a random Mexican family-style diner, where we feasted on tasty pozole and camarones del diablo, we finally made it to Sandeep’s studio. The space is big; it’s a wide, long room with a little office area at the front, and it’s extremely tidy and well organized— not one thing appeared to be out of place, and everything is color-coded and meticulously labeled. There was lots of work on the walls, and for the first few minutes Sandeep wildly darted about the room, enthusiastically gesturing, and breathlessly explaining this piece and that piece, and to be honest, I was having a hard time keeping up. But finally, we settled into his office area with cups of green tea and his high-octane energy mellowed a bit and we fell into easier conversation. Sandeep’s thoughts move quickly, and they don’t follow linear paths, instead they zig-zag, whizz, and dash about, but they circle back upon themselves, and are brought and held together by recurring themes. Much of Sandeep’s art is fueled by his curiosity about in-between spaces— when something is no longer what it was, but hasn’t quite yet become something else. His work explores the territory of collapsed tangibility and structure, when meaning and corporality become destabilized, allowing new understanding and perception to emerge. When discussing his current work, which incorporates painting and embossed drawing on Duralene, Sandeep said he was inspired by the idea of a landscape folding in upon itself, where the valleys, the mountains, and the horizon give way to abstraction, but the topography still manges to come through to the viewer. This mutability is enhanced by the film-like quality of Duralane, which creates a range of variation in the material— translucency, opacity, and dimensionality simultaneously exist within the striated colors and black spaces. Sandeep’s work reveals the nature of materials and the impression of the hand and body, as much as it emphasizes the amorphous quality of space and experience.

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Animatorio


This is motion design studio Animatorio’s latest animation. It’s an open title sequence for MTV Brazil’s Rockgol. This design team uses 3d, 2d, programming, and stop motion techniques to create their awesome videos. To see more works by them visit their Vimeo!

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Alexandra Becker-Black’s Watercolor Portraits Seem To Emerge From The Ether

Alexandra Becker-Black- WatercolorAlexandra Becker-Black- Watercolor Alexandra Becker-Black- Watercolor Alexandra Becker-Black- Watercolor

Portland painter Alexandra Becker-Black is talented beyond her years. Her paintings, soft-spoken and carrying the nearly absent weight of a shadow, illuminate the body in its pure and natural state. Becker-Black has a sophisticated approach in utilizing negative space to its full potential, creating an atmosphere that the body seems to emerge out of, in an ethereal, ghostly way; as if called forth. Perhaps due to her strong yoga practice, Becker-Black incorporates many yoga poses into her work, featuring women twisting their bodies elegantly in pose. A revolving theme of flight and birds is woven into most of her imagery; birds soaring overhead or perched on top of the figures. An allusion to freedom and flight; or pushing ones self to points of self actualization. Taken from Becker-Black’s website, this analysis by Shu-Ju Wang is an excellent summary of her work:

Once recorded, she works with the still images but continues to purge from the already naked form, choosing only what she needs and adding only what is absolutely necessary. You see muscles tense and strain against gravity; you see figures in serene repose; you see energy suddenly released when a small flock of birds fly out of a woman’s opened hands. All of this is conjured up in front of your eyes even as a torso fades to gray or a leg disappears, creating work that is ethereal and luminously beautiful, haunting, evocative and complex.”

The way the tones and color melts away brings peace to the otherwise strained poses and moods that the figures themselves are experiencing. The implied motion is a driving force for the notion of change and evolution. Always moving forward, the beauty on the canvas in direct correlation to the act of living, breathing, being.

(Excerpt from Source)

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Interview: Nick Cave

 

Mixed Media

Mixed Media

 

 

Nick Cave combines free-spirited motion exploratory modern dance with ostentatious sculptural detail to breath new life into contemporary art. In many ways, Nick’s work function within the vein of African art/costuming in the sense that they are intended to be “danced,” and enlivened within the context of performance and dance to illustrate and reflect upon societal mores and the cultural landscape. With references to haute couture, sculpture, performance, African American culture, costume, masquerade and beyond, Nick’s “Sound Suits” defy categorization. Beautiful/Decay recently had the opportunity to interview Nick Cave to discuss his background, inspiration and ideology behind the suits. Nick Cave is currently showing his latest works at Jack Shainman Gallery, until Feb 7, 2009. 

 

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Ian Addison Hall

Ian Addison Hall’s Patterns of Science series is named after a program created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) shortly after World War II. The program’s purpose was to prevent an apocalyptic third world war by promoting intercultural understanding. At the time many thought the fundamental cause of international conflict was humanity’s failure to realize the ideals of a world community and that we are all grounded in common values.

Using vintage catalog imagery, each piece in this series explores the relationship between the patterns that exist in fashion and the patterns that comprise human genetics. While a clothing pattern is designed to make the wearer look and feel different than everyone else, when expanded over the model’s exposed skin it instead represents the common biological and emotional framework that we all share. Acknowledging the shared traits that we all share will encourage empathy, compassion, and better understanding.

 

Presented by the offset rack card printing company, Next Day Flyers.

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