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Susanna Bauer Threads And Weaves Over Small Natural Objects

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“Most of my pieces are small sculptural objects often based on found natural materials. I like giving time to the inconspicuous things that surround us and often go unnoticed, paying attention to small details and the tactile quality of objects. Appropriating traditional craft techniques like weaving and crochet as a means of sculpture brings a contemplative element to the development of my work. I am interested in unusual combinations of materials, the experimentation with fragility and strength and the individual stories that evolve and shape themselves in the process of making.” – Susanna Bauer

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Awesome Video Of The Day: TV On The Radio- Will Do

Love this sci-fi, trippy, lovey dovey, video for TV On The Radio’s Will Do single. Directed by Dugan O’Neal.

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Jesse Treece’s Vintage Collage

Artist Jesse Treece specializes in collage.  Using vintage imagery, he creates surreal scenes and portraits.  His collages nearly feel like lost scenes of 1970’s science-fiction and horror films.  The collages often juxtapose science with nature, inside with outside, and large with small. Treece makes effective use of familiar imagery and styles to create entirely new artwork.  The immersive pieces tell fantastic stories, as well as the mundane ones of life through a flood of images.

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Caleb Charland’s Bacteria Growth

Caleb Charland - Photography

Beautiful photographs by Caleb Charland documenting the growth bacteria on film.

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An Immersive, Flexible Staircase Installation That You Can Walk, Grab Onto And Pull Yourself Up

Numen/For Use - Net Linz

Numen/For Use - Net Linz

Numen/For Use - Net Linz

Numen/For Use - Net Linz

Austrian/Croatian Design Collective numen/for use has created many varying types of “social sculptures” over the years. Their latest effort is formed from interwoven nets, sandbags and wires and acts as a walkable structure. Housed in the OK Center For Contemporary Art in Linz (Austria), visitors can walk, lie in, grab onto and pull themselves through the nets. This sculpture stands in for the staircase normally used in the exhibition space. The nets are strung up from the ceiling and stretched out with the help of sandbags at their bases, creating different forms, shapes and pathways ready to explore.

These images show just how surreal the experience is – as if you are walking through mid air without enough support, unaided by any hard surfaces. We can see just how immersive this course is, with the nets stretching out in very organic ways around the people walking. As the gallery goers make their way through the course, traversing along the tunnels and scaling heights, one is reminded of the contour lines on a topographical map. It feels as if we are seeing images of people in some new virtual reality – or a glimpse of the future environments that will one day surround us. Perhaps this is the new ergonomic way of walking?

This architectural technique numen/for use has created is similar to Tomás Saraceno‘s exhibition Cloud Cities. He choose to create inflatable spheres and other large structures which visitors accessed with ladders. Just like in “Net Linz”, people could lie on and move around within these forms. Saraceno has also enlisted the help of nets in the past to create a similar feeling for his guests; one of weightlessness and the defiance of gravity. Perhaps we will all get to experience this in the near future? Perhaps nets will eventually replace escalators, elevators and even the humble staircase…. (Via Designboom)

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Azuma Makoto Installs A Dazzling, 13-Foot Floral Tower In The Middle Of The Ocean

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Off the coast of Hinoba-an in the Negros Islands region of the Philippines, artist Azuma Makoto has constructed a floating, 13-foot-tall bouquet of Heliconia flowers and banana leaves. Shimmering against the ocean horizon in stark contrasts of red, green, and blue, the installation rises like a paradisiac mirage. Entitled “In Bloom #2,” the project juxtaposes terrestrial environments with the sea, bringing art and floral life where there would otherwise be open space. The following artist’s statement describes the construction and context of the art-island:

“A 4-meters long botanical sculpture consist[ing] of approximately 10,000 red Heliconia [was] installed on a simple raft used by the local fisherman. With nothing block[ing] the harsh sunlight, blown by salted water, the sculpture of flowers quietly floated in the cobalt blue ocean. The ocean accounts [for] 70% of the surface of the earth, and therefore it created [a] magnificent stage for the project.” (Source)

Following “Exobiotanica” — an exceptional project wherein Azuma sent boticanical arrangements into the stratosphere — “Bloom #2” demonstrates his creative goal to explore the visual and thematic effects of putting flowers in “environments where nature does not allow them to exist” (Source). The result is a detached form of beauty. Azuma’s work brings up questions of nature and place, and, by doing so, fosters an appreciation for the Earth’s harsh, disparate, and yet ultimately connected environments.

Click here to watch the video documentary of the construction of “Bloom #2,” and be sure to check out Azuma’s website to view more of his projects, including a collection of beautiful flowers embedded in ice, which we featured earlier this year. (Via Spoon & Tamago)

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Gabriela Herman Photography

Gabriela Herman Photography

Gabriela Herman’s photography portfolio features a wide array of self portraits and photos from various travels.

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Ben Butler Creates “Unbounded” Installation From 10,000 Wood Sticks

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Standing like a miniaturized skeleton city, American artist Ben Butler has installed an epic geometric sculpture that seems to distort any sense of space. The installation, titled Unbounded, is a site-specific piece for Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas. The work is made up of ten thousand small rods of poplar wood. Through the creation of complex grids, the artist and a team put together this epic structure, building section by section, almost like a block building meditation. The artist notes that Unbounded “alludes to the notion that its form has no defined boundary, that is it untamed and fills the space according to its own logic.” Butler’s work, which is not solely sculptural but also delves into printmaking and draughtsmanship, consistently refers and reflects on the notion of mass. Each work is intricate, meticulous, but perhaps, most importantly, explores a sort of metaphysical notion of space. Delicate, yet powerful in scale, his work tends to use elements of the earth. The combination of the power of size and the natural material — which acts as a connection to the earth — allows his work to truly carry an awe inspiring essence. Almost like an Agnes Martin notion of finding these quiet patterns within nature meets the raw power of element and structure like the work of Richard Serra. Profound, with a nod to a notion of fun and simplicity, Butler’s installation truly plays with perception. (via IGNANT)

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