Get Social:

Adam Batchelor

tumblr_l4qp8eu4Za1qzgspwo1_1280

Adam Batchelor is an illustrator from Norwich, UK. His work heavily uses white space to draw attention to his detailed illustrations. His illustrations look as if you dropped something on the floor…and waited way more than the 5 second rule to pick it up. A little gross, but beautifully done! Batchelors’ series Nepali Waste (which the piece above is a part of)  uses a variety of mixed media like colored pencil, dirt, blood, and even mosquito! Very interesting.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Sam Burford’s Sculptures Made From Star Wars and Blade Runner Time-Lapse Photographs

Sam Burford lives and works in London. Inspired by such films as Star Wars and Blade Runner he creates photographic work in multiple media that encapsulate entire films within them. Take for example his sculpture made out of jesmonite that consists of a time-lapse photograph of Star Wars IV transformed into a surface relief. The film is condensed into an abstract pattern and presented as a three dimensional sculpture. In another piece a time-lapse photographic detail from Blade Runner is highlighted on hand printed film and allowed to curl for a dimensional effect. With his work he serves to reveal the optical patterns inherent in the moving image that can be captured with modern technology.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jasper Geenhuizen Creates Graffiti Using Light

 

This isn’t the first time anyone’s ever used long exposure photography to make compositions with light, but Jasper Geenhuizen (Netherlands) is doing some of the best I’ve seen. Strong colors, and perfect set up and location. This is how you do it right. There’s no gimmick to these either- I would dig these pictures with or without the light work. They emit a damp, nocturnal atmosphere that’s not easy to reproduce. In Geenhuizen’s words, “Everybody can make light graffiti, but it is truly art to be able to combine the light with the place.” Hope to see much more from this guy going forward.

Currently Trending

Daniel Barkley Paints The Nude Body Engaged In Acts Of Emotion And Ritual

Daniel Barkley - Painting

“Deep Water” (2006). Acrylic on canvas, 56” x 50”.

Daniel Barkley - Painting

“Dare Devil” (2004). Acrylic on canvas, 29” x 42”.

Daniel Barkley - Painting

“Brother’s Keeper” (2012). Acrylic on canvas, 60” x 60”.

Daniel Barkley - Painting

“Incredule (redux)” (2010). Watercolour on paper, 26” x 36”.

Daniel Barkley is a Canadian artist who explores the physicality of the human figure and its relationship to mythology and the history of art. Recurring among his paintings are nude, predominately male bodies depicted in scenes of both visceral power and stunning vulnerability. Whether drawing in the dirt, lying prone on the ice, or anointing themselves with mud or paint, the characters appear to be engaged in profound rituals of unknown meaning. Barkley’s work captures the emotion of the event, as well as the role of flesh and muscle in the enactment of human spirituality.

By presenting his characters nude, Barkley explores narratives that are powerful and mythological in their appearance, but open to analysis and extrapolation. “Clothes denote social class, profession, period, gender, age, etc.,” Barkley states in his website’s Artist’s Statement. “By eliminating them, paring down the mise-en-scene, the interpretation of the narrative is broadened to hopefully include the viewer’s own speculations.” Caught between states of intimacy and theatricality, Barkley’s nude figures operate as metaphorical expressions of the pain and passion that has shaped Western mythology.

More of Barkley’s incredible work — spanning over a decade — can be found here. (Via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Terrifying Barbie Tidal Wave Composed Of 5,000 Dolls

annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-02annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-04annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-01annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-05

For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Her sister’s illness, she explains, was related to the childhood they shared, one that was marked in part by the death of her brother.

For the artist, the wave is meant to convey her own relationship to overwhelming memories; it is 4 meters wide and stands at 3 meters tall, forcing viewers to be encased completely within its depths. The piece seems to swell with cascading blond hair, forever caught at the terrifying moment before its breaking. Adding to its realism, Thas chose to exhibit it on the beach as part of 2014’s Sculpture by the Sea amidst the sounds and smells of real waves.

The barbies in the piece, wild hair tangled and stripped of their clothing, do indeed seem ominous, but they are also startlingly sympathetic. They are second-hand toys, once loved but eventually discarded. They have endured a sort of violence, having been scarred by knives and bite marks. Each one has a poignant narrative all her own; one doll simply bears the words “please love me” on her chest. The plastic toys, symbolic of the scores of children who once owned them, are somehow lonesome now, robbed of childhood’s affections. Their demanding presence is urgent and desperate, their blue eyed faces pressing us to remember both the magical and painful bits of our youths. (via Design Boom)

Currently Trending

Asja Jung’s Brutal Ballerinas: Footballers Dancing In A Forest Of Green

asja jung drawing

asja jung drawing

asja jung drawing

asja jung drawing

Taking her football player series and combining it with a product usually reserved for the masses, artist Asja Jung has found a clever, new way to market her work. She has created a limited 40 edition set of calendars featuring tightly drawn renditions of NFL players. Admittedly not a big football fan, Jung first became intrigued with these brutal ballerinas when she patroned a local sports bar in her Queens, NY neighborhood. Images in the following day’s papers of Mark Sanchez, Eli Manning and Geno Smith grabbed her attention and she started incorporating the stills into her narrative. Another series which she had been working on just prior to finding the players, entitled “Neighbors”, placed subjects in an elaborately detailed background similar to a dense, tropical forest. Her thoughtful rendering produced a positive/negative space offset by vibrant color. The figures in these, which have included chimpanzees and reptiles, acted as buffer points to highly imaginative designs. Jung proceeded to use the same aesthetic in staging her football drawings. The dramatic nature of sport provided a rich source of information and the players soon replaced the creatures in “Neighbors”. To arrive at a final draft, dozens of studies were made, showing countless variations of mid-air tackles, high catches, scrimmages and close up personals. The finished drawings feature a nice balance between unique draftsmanship and mainstream accessibility. To date, pieces have been shown in the VIP section of Jets Stadium, and The National Art Museum of Sport.

Currently Trending

Greg Parma Smith Makes Me Feel Weird

Greg Parma Smith’s paintings give me an uneasy feeling. The first time I came across his site I couldn’t tell if I loved or hated the work.  The bizarre mime masks, snake-like textures, photo realist painting, retro 80’s faux brush splatters, and mundane subject matter make me scratch my head in confusion. Even his website is wacky with a woodgrain pallete floating behind his name.  I’ve put off posting his work for several weeks but I’m giving the work my official thumbs up. This work is just too weird to simply be decorative paint slinging. What do you think?

Currently Trending

Jessica Fortner

Jessica Fortner

Toronto based illustrator Jessica Fortner creates 3D scenes using a variety of materials, and photographs them to create a final illustration. Complete with their own story lines, her sculptures are at once repulsive and grotesque, charming and endearing, and are fabricated out of polymer clay (Super Sculpey).

Here’s the background behind The Gold Horned Hexapede Bear, pictured above:
“The Gold Horned Hexapede bear roams the Arctic in search of her long lost love. Hexa is the last of her kind, her breed having been killed off by man. Hexa is the giant of the arctic tundra. In her mouth see carries the man that killed her partner, half eaten and still alive. He stares out from the beast’s mouth motionless and starved.”

Currently Trending