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Self-Folding Paper Robot Assembles Itself In Less Than 4 Minutes And Even Walks Away

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US-based team of scientists has built a robot that folds itself into an origami-inspired shape starting from a flat sheet. The assemblage of such robot doesn’t require any human intervention. It is made from a polymer material which shrinks when heated, also has electronics and motors attached to it. When the heating elements affect the hinges made in paper, the robot starts transforming into a crab-like machine. The whole process takes about 4 minutes before the robot can start walking.

The team behind the project said their inspiration came from the complex 3-D shapes in origami: like in the Japanese paper art, various three-dimensional shapes are constructed from a single sheet of paper. This robot takes origami a step further. According to the developer team, such self-assembling robots can be greatly employed in construction or rescue works.

“[They could be delivered] through a confined passageway, such as a collapsed building, after which they would assemble into their final form autonomously,” states Marc Lavine, senior editor at Science.

Robot‘s small size makes is what makes it very useful because of the easy transportation and storage. Apart from search-and-rescue missions, a more advanced version of the robot could be easily used construction works, especially in places that are hard to reach. The whole project is said to cost $11,000 but with the initial designs in place, the mass-production robots should cost around $100 each. (via NPR)

Watch a short video about the project after the jump.

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Pae White’s Typographic Yarn Installations Inspired By Insomnia

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Los Angeles-based artist Pae White merges art, design, craft and architecture through site specific installations and individual works which defy our expectations of a variety of techniques and media. For her South London Gallery exhibition she creates a mesmerising installation in which vast quantities of coloured yarn span and criss-cross the room to create supergraphics spelling out words that can only be deciphered by navigating the space. Inspired by a period of insomnia and consequent reflection on the transience of our existence, the letters and words emerge and dissolve depending on both our physical relationship to them and the relative weight of the overall aesthetic experience. (via)

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The Ancient Art Of Mandalas Revisited With A Pop Culture Twist

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Husband and wife visual artist team Hillerbrand+Magsamen crafted a series of twists on the traditional mandala. More commonly known through the Tibetan sand mandala, the original, ancient process consists of intricate patterns of sand that are later destroyed. Hillberbrand+Magsamen’s interpretation is similarly meticulous, but has a pop culture twist. Using things like books, Legos, shoes, sippy cups, things that are blue and others green, they arrange these objects in a circular, radiating formation. This light-hearted assemblage has a deeper meaning to the artists, who explain:

Loosely translated to mean “circle,” a mandala is far more than a simple shape. It represents wholeness, and can be seen as a model for the organizational structure of life itself–a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds. We have created mandala’s within our own home out of the stuff we have found lying around in our own creative exploration.

So often, we get caught up in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The act of creating these works is a slow, meditative process. As these objects form a circle, there is consideration to not only placement, but the associations we have to them. It allows us to think about how the things we own are a reflection of who we are. (Via Faith is Torment)

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400 Foot High Hammock Installation Is Pretty Damn High

Mothership Space Net Penthouse- Installation

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Mothership Space Net Penthouse- Installation

Both base jumpers and highliners gather in the Moab desert every fall to play with heights, but this year a 400 foot high hammock installation brought them closer than ever. The construction of this net, called the Mothership Space Net Penthouse, was headed by Andy Lewis and completed with the help of 50 base jumpers over a period of three days.

“Highliners attempted to walk across the five different legs of the net, varying in lengths up to 80 meters long (262 feet), BASE jumpers leapt daily from the human sized hole in the middle of the net and paragliders made several flybys while dropping world-class wingsuit pilots from high above so they could buzz by over groups of friends hanging out in space. This upgrade of size to the space net concept was a massive scale up from the 2012 three sided “Space Thong” design, which was also shared by both groups but with less cohesiveness.” (Excerpt from Source)

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Anthony Sneed

From far away, Anthony Sneed’s unique brand of Minimalism instantly calls to mind the reductive elegance of Dan Flavin–or the boisterous, hypercolor modernism of Sol Lewitt’s recent work. However, on closer inspection, Sneed’s seeming hard edged “paintings” reveal themselves to be three-dimensional scultpural works; Modern tromp l’oeils of sorts. Sneed’s work amalgamates the conceptual framework of the Minimalist tradition with Op Art’s investigation of the relationship between illusion and picture plane, movement and depth, reality and perception. In this sense, Sneed’s work calls to mind Tony Smith’s geometrical modules, in his capacity to create drama through simplicity, scale, and revealing what is not there.

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Eric Cahan And The Science Of Light

 

Intrigued by the power and nostalgia of Nature, New York based artist Eric Cahan has been devoting his time to long journeys, willing to observe and study the behavior of sun light and its impact on earth.

Cahan´s main project “Sky Series” invites you to get absorbed by unique shots of the sunrise and sunset, enigmatic and mysterious pieces titled only by location and time. Each photography is a visual and spiritual souvenir that captures a magic hour, a perfect and harmonious glow of natural light.

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Eric Wareheim’s sick, twisted, and hilarious music world.

Eric Wareheim of Tim & Eric is officially my favorite new music video director. His videos are jaw dropping weird, funny, low tech, high tech, offensive, and hallucinogenic all at the same time. He’s known for his comedy skits but I really think he has a future in being a full time music video director having made videos for MGMT, Maroon 5, Ben Folds, Phantom Planet, and many others. Be warned some of these are vulgar and should not be watched at work. I’m speechless… Amazing!

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Michael L. Abramson’s Unseen Photographs Of Chicago Nightlife In The 1970’s

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The posthumous exhibition of Michael L. Abramson’s work, titled, “Michael L. Abramson: Pulse of the Night,” features previously unseen photographs from night clubs in Chicago in the 1970’s. The grainy black and white shots highlight a side of Chicago that had been previously undocumented. The exhibition is co-presented by the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Columbia College Chicago Library.

Abramson, who died three years ago, shot on a Leica and spent a lot of time shooting in Chicago’s South Side, where he compiled work for his book “Light: On The South Side,” of which this work is a continuation of. Often compared to Brassai, who photographed the Parisian nightlife scene, Abramson showed a new side of Chicago. Abramson has work in the permanent collections of many institutions, such as the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago History Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, and the California Museum of Photography.

This show will be up through December 19th at the Columbia College Chicago Library.

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