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Menno Fokma’s Many-Layered Motion

Dark and intricately complex design work and stills by Dutch motion graphics artist Menno Fokma.

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Robjoe

A very nice collection of prints, graphic, typography, and apparel design from Estonian designer/illustrator Robi Jõeleht AKA Robjoe.

 

Robjoe is presented by Next Day Flyers who make postcard printing easy and affordable. For fast postcard printing services, order online.

 

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Design Watch: Helmut Palla

Helmut Palla blurs the lines between innovative furniture and art with his chair sculptures. Some of these objects look like you could sit on them but why would you when you could sit on the floor and stare at them instead?

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Spellbinding Death Masks And Sugar Skulls

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For Epitaph, British photographer Rankin teams up with Beaty Editor Andrew Gallimore to create spellbinding death masks inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead and Roman Catholic All Souls Day. Like the sugar skulls, or calavera, used to celebrate the holiday, these elegant masks put a vital and lively spin on death. Decked out in intricate beading and filigree, their models look luxurious and festive.

Calavera, normally colored in vibrant greens, reds, yellows, and blues are often eaten after the holiday; adorned in glittering stars and blooming daisies, these living skulls look like sweet confections. The female faces, painted in black, become a youthful template for imaginative explorations of an afterlife that awaits us after old age. As if from another world, their gray-green eyes stand starkly against coal-toned flesh. Rankin and Gallimore infuse the editorial with a hefty dose of high-fashion edge, introducing elements like metal spikes and and chains. These harder elements blend seamlessly with the iconography of the Day of the Dead; in one mask, a red clown nose made of punk-rock studs puts a contemporary spin on the timeless tradition.

Rankin is not new to the theme of death. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, he was compelled to break cultural taboo surrounding the dead, to face head-on his fears of dying. For last year’s photo series ALIVE: In the Face of Death, published by Hunger Magazine, he photographed those effected most by death, giving voice to grieving family members and to resilient individuals living with terminal diseases. Here, his enthusiastic lens provides solace from the fear of the unknown, inviting us to celebrate those we’ve lost as we mourn them. (via Trend Land)

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Vhils Carved Street art portraits

Vhils doesn’t just apply his street art on top of walls but actually carves into them creating a permanent site specific image that is ingrained onto the surface of the buildings. Becoming one with the pre-existing architecture Vhils chips, scratches, and cuts away at the walls revealing images that were there all along but that no one could see.

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Thomas Poulsom’s Birds Made of Legos

 

Thomas Poulsom of Bristol, UK has a really nice flickr account full of creative creations using legos. The legos almost lend a really cool, pixelated quality to the 3-dimensional, playful works. Probably the best of the bunch are his series of birds. He’s done birds native to Britain and a tropical bird series as well. I think the reason why these come off so well is how life-like they are. Definitely not you average plastic bird. (via)

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Katie Scott’s Science Inspired Drawings

Katie Scott is an illustrator and printmaker from England. Her works are equal parts 19th century science illustration and tarot card mysticism. Once you look at them long enough, all plants, and living organisms in general, start looking like inspired sculptures. Check out everything on her website, then go to the park and look at the plants!

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Thomas Allen’s Pulp Fiction Pop-Up Photographs

Always Fascinated by pop-up books, Thomas Allen displays an infallible talent for the creation of the illusion of three dimensions, using old pulp fiction books as the subjects for his sets.These books tattered covers and yellowed pages are not mere objects to display on a shelf, for the artist but a prodigious inventory of actors and scenes, just waiting to be directed.

Allen patiently cuts out the figures, freeing them from their two-dimensional state: the actors are then raised from the covers and come alive thanks to skillful use of lighting and the camera’s lens. Bent and positioned, the scripted drama is staged, bringing to life the stories written and not written in the books that act now as the stories stage.

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