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Lizabeth Eva Rossoff’s “Terracotta Army” With Pop Culture Heads

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San Francisco-based artist Lizabeth Eva Rossoff has created a mashup of iconic statues and and characters in contemporary popular culture. By physically combining China’s ancient Terracotta Army with the heads of Bart Simpson, Batman, and Mickey Mouse, they fuse Eastern and Western culture. Rossoff class her series Xi’an American Warriors.

The artist explains that her work,  “playfully explores the concerns of American media’s global influence and China’s industry of counterfeiting the copyrighted properties held by said media.” In essence, these sculptures represent a cycle.

Each stately clay piece stands 18 inches tall, and their appearance was created by using the same process that built the original third century BCE warriors from Lintong District, Xi’an Shaanxi province. She even worked with a Terracotta Warrior replica studio in Xi’an who make their clay sculptures using the same ground that was used so long ago. And, for a limited time, these artworks are available to buy on her website. (Via Endless Geyser of Awesome)

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SCREEN BURNS

screen burnsSCREEN BURNS is a pop-up exhibition juried by Luis Gispert being held at a new little space in Williamsburg, JCIA Video. From December 11th – January 3rd look for the storefront that looks like a giant TV! JCIA Video storefront 522 Metropolitan Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11211.

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Nicer Graphics

 

 

Fans of typography and clean illustrations with a dash of experimental yet calculated layout need to keep tabs on German designer Sven Neitzel AKA Nicer Graphics. Lets hope has access to good printing services with all gorgeous prints, posters, and graphics that are piled high on his portfolio site.

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Mitch Griffiths’ Paintings Mix Old Master Technique With Contemporary Culture

British artist Mitch Griffiths‘ work is inspired by the light and the composition of the Old Masters, but his context and content depict issues that concern modern culture. In his work, Griffiths addresses the disposable nature of contemporary culture by immortalizing this transience with the perceived permanence of the painting medium. His figurative portraits are dark and foreboding and often turbulent. The drama depicted in his paintings, though contemporary, feels universal, historical, and personal. Though many of his images resonate with religious iconography, the “symbolism reflects a modern quest for redemption from the overriding self-obsession and consumerism of contemporary society, with its vanity and greed, addictions and needless suffering.”

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Mauro Gatti’s House of Fun

Lots of eye popping illustration and motion work on Mauro Gatti’s portfolio site.

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Pet Volcano


Artist Nelly Ben Hayoun’s The Other Volcano tries to question the domestication of nature for entertainment purposes (not your middle school baby egg in this case): “How would you deal with a live volcano in the middle of your living room? Would you try to destroy it? Would you just disconnect it from the mains? Would you be more popular because you share your life with a volcano? Would you invite people to see it, and switch it on at the end of the meal to create a ‘surprising’ effect?” Beware, the pet will sit for a couple weeks in select volunteers’ living rooms.

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Brandon Jan Blommaert

Experience the geometrically pleasing sensation that is Brandon Jan Blommaert’s gif images. His new collection of moving imagery is not only stunning but hypnotic, too. I just lost 10 minutes of work!

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Best Of 2012: Jenine Shereos Human Hair Leaves

In Jenine Shereos’ series Leaf the intricacies of a leaf’s veining are recreated by wrapping, stitching, and knotting together strands of human hair.  Inspired by the delicate and detailed venation of a leaf, Shereos began stitching individual strands of hair by hand into a water- soluble backing material. At each point where one strand of hair intersected another, she stitched a tiny knot, so that when the backing was dissolved, the entire piece was able to hold its form.

The complex network of lines present in this work mimics the organic patterns found in nature and speaks to the natural systems of transformation, growth and decay. Allusions to the vascular tissue of plants, as well as the vascular system of the human body, exist simultaneously; the delicate trace of a hair falling silently, imperceptibly, from one’s head becoming the veins of a leaf as it falls from a tree leaving its indelible imprint on the ground below. (via oddity central )

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