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Daniel Danger

With a name like Daniel Danger, well, a certain excess of awesome is expected of you. Danger delivers. The product of an artistically-inclined family, Danger is an illustrator, printmaker, and musician working out of New England. His works feature mysterious figures wandering the midnight-shaded streets of cities in decay. Spirits rise in unison from old houses and barns where now dreams of daylight lie interred. Shadows loom, larger-than-life (or death?) in urban sprawl and twisted forest alike. Each piece tells its own dark tale.

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Interview: Dan Attoe

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When I met Dan Attoe we were both starting the MFA program at the University of Iowa.  I’ve known him for eight years now, and even though Dan lives in Washington State and I live in New York we have maintained our friendship through collaborations, especially with the art group Paintallica.

While at school we became friends – I’ve noticed Dan sort of collects weirdos like me.  Before coming to grad school Dan had created a studio practice that involved making a painting a day, and was already working on paintings that have a relationship to his current work.  While in school Dan wasn’t stuck on some notion of an ideal practice, he just worked while everyone else was talking about how to work, he wasn’t terribly concerned with theories; he has a background in psychology and knew to trust his own creative faculties.

While everyone else was screwing around with their identities, Dan had already settled into a kind of self-knowledge.  I don’t know if his gnosis came from growing up in the deep woods with a forest ranger for a father, or from one of the experiences he had growing up that caused him to study psychology and art.

Being alive you meet a lot of bull shitters and have to play a lot of stupid games, but rarely do you meet someone as genuine and considerate as Dan.

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Livia Marin Ceramics Melt Away Into Beautiful Puddles

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Artist Livia Marin’s Nomad Patterns is a series of classical ceramics depicted in a most unconventional manner. Her representation of the destruction of ceramics is fascinating in the sense that she has chosen to use melted ceramics rather than breaking, chipping, or shattering them in the way they are known to do. In this sense, she has brought a sort of silent, unconventional destruction to the ceramics in her series.

The fascinating aspect of her work lies in the way the ceramics are being destroyed. She merges the ideas of “care and ruin” by making it difficult to distinguish whether the ceramics are being destroyed or put back together.The fluidity of the melted ceramics and the way that the patterns are maintained add a touch of surrealism to the series. The physically impossible nature of her project as well as the aesthetic aspects of her work make for an original merging of physics and art.

In this sense, her work reaches beyond its artistic capacities and underlines the artistic aspects of physics as well as the merging of science and art. Marin’s work merging of the notions of restoration and destruction also provides a reflection on these two notions, which are, in her work two sides of the same coin.

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Diana Chyrzynska Remixes Beautiful Faces To Surprising Effect

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Diana Chryzynska’s photoshop-ed female faces seem surprising natural upon first sight. With most of the pieces of a normal face present, the viewer’s brain mashes them together to make sense of them, when actually they’re quite reworked. It’s fascinating how well your brain is able to reconcile two noses and two mouths sandwiched between two hands with eyes on top. Somehow, it takes a few seconds to realize what you’re seeing is completely surreal. Of course you realize what you’re looking at isn’t quite right, but it takes a while for your brain to sort out exactly what that is.

Maybe what makes the images more consumable is the appealing features: big eyes, luscious lips, unblemished skin.  I don’t think it’s that, though. It’s like when you read a word like baeufitul, and your brain is able to organize it into beautiful (with some coaxing). The see-through hands over the faces are the most interesting in terms of theme. They feel like veils, hiding the strange faces from view, though not entirely. It feels like the women are hiding their mixed up faces, but some are peaceful while others are confrontational. Most close their eyes, but the confrontational ones stare out from behind their hands, self-consciously aware of their strange arrangement.

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Akira Kurosawa’s Far Out Dreams

Many know seminal Japanese director Akira Kurosawa for his acclaimed Seven Samurai, but recently I stumbled across “Dreams,” surreal vignettes based off of his dreams. I like the idea of filming dreams- a little peak into his subconscious mind. Haunting, beautiful, bizarre.

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Cursor Kite

Cursor Kite

Is that a plane? A bird? Or perhaps, a Cursor Kit? Nerd alert! Very little is known about this kite. It seems to be bringing the desktop of your computer outdoors (pfff, finally). Quad-line control, asymmetrical framing, nearly invisible hand-formed stainless fittings, and opposed-bow tensioning for the sail make this incredible kite look digitally pasted right into the sky. Read more to watch a video of it in motion.

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Douglas Coupland Invites Public To Cover His Head In Chewing Gum

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Vancouver artist Douglas Coupland has made his head available to be vandalized – well an over-sized fiberglass sculpture of his head at least. In conjunction with his solo exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Coupland installed a seven foot black resin and polyester sculpture on the lawn in front of the gallery. Called ‘Gumhead‘ and described by the artist as a “gum-based, crowd sourced, publicly interactive, self-portrait“, the striking sculpture has a very imposing Soviet-era aesthetic to it.

Gumhead was unveiled in May, and Coupland invited the public to plaster their chewing gum all over it for the duration of 4 months. He hoped to build up such a thick layer of gum, that his features would become obscured. Here he comments on witnessing the process:

At first the added gum looked like jewels against the black. And then the Excel chewing gum van parked beside it during the Jazz Festival and took the whole head to the next level. And then we had a heat wave and the gum started to weep. And now it has a 24-hours cloud of bees and wasps around it. It’s a dream. (Source)

People have reacted to the piece in many different ways. Coupland was delighted with the interactions:

People went directly to snot. They tried big earrings but they would fall off. During the last month, we’ve had the Ebola outbreak so everyone started doing hemorrhagic bleed-out from the eyelids. (Source)

With plans of washing the gum off the sculpture and starting the whole process again in January, when the show moves to Toronto, Coupland is interested to see what else unfolds. Admittedly, he is a bit unsure about it’s success during the Canadian winter, especially the -10 degree temperatures and if the gum will even stick. (Via Escape Kit)

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Pip&Pop Creates Miniature Worlds Made Out Of Pastel-Colored Candies

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Nicole Andrijevic and Tanya Schultz, an Australian artist duo, Pip&Pop, collaborate to create delicious-looking installation in various galleries around the world. The constructions, intricately intalled in a gallery floor, is made out of colourful sweets mixed with glitter, beads, modelling clay, wax, polystyrene, wire, toys, sand, and other equally vibrant found objects.

This mini candy wonderland, a cartooonish looking maquette, is heavily influenced by Japanese pop culture.

“Throughout history there has been a long tradition of depicting journeys through, and in search of, imaginary lands and utopian worlds[…] the work draws on this rich history of other worlds as told through mythologies, Japanese folk tales, video games, cinema, children’s literature and ancient cosmologies.”

(Via Feather of Me and HuffPost)

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