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Ramon Coronado

RAMÓN CORONADO

Ramon Coronado is an independent, cross-media visual designer based out of Los Angeles. I saw his work at the Art Center Undergraduate Graduation show and noticed it immediately due to Ramon’s clean and professional presentation. I really liked his Mercado Negro project (after the jump), a 2 week on-taking that deals with reclaiming an ordinary, everyday object and transforming it into a whole new object.

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Jenine Shereos’ Creates Beautifully Intricate Spiderwebs Out Of Lace

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Boston-based artist Jenine Shereos who we’ve featured in the past for her amazing series of leaves made from human hair.  her amazing series of leaf forms made from human hair. Her more recent work revisits the idea of human-manipulated nature with “De/constructed Lace,” a site-specific installation series of knit-lace that mimics spiderwebs.

In Marnay-Sur-Seine, France she draped the knit threads in windows and doorways, looking like massive, delicate spiderwebs, echoing the white lace curtains in many local homes. The works are not perfect, Charlotte’s Web creations, but looser, more organic forms. Shereos says on her website:

“This installation of knit-lace is suspended in a state of unraveling. The process of its making and unmaking are one and the same.”

In Boston, she worked with black thread and crystals, allowing her web-like art to cast filigreed shadows on the wall amid flickering rainbows from the hanging crystal. The webs are more ominous in black, connecting to walls and windows and floor with fine strands.

“Some of these site-specific works are installed for a period of weeks for viewers to interact with, and others function as a sort of ephemeral, private performance existing afterwards in documentation. Oftentimes, collaborations intended or unintended arise within the environment; a spider spins its delicate webs from the white strands of thread suspended in an unraveling knit curtain, fibrous fragments of seaweed become embedded within a structure of knit fibers, or an array of rainbows flicker amidst white walls and black curtains.”

By co-opting the aesthetics of the natural world, Shereos creates a conscious interaction with the structure of the landscape or the architecture surrounding her art, uniting real and surreal, natural and constructed, fluidity and stillness.

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Michael Guidetti

"(Bounce Room 2), 2009". Digital video projection, watercolor on canvas

"(Bounce Room 2), 2009". Digital video projection, watercolor on canvas

Took me a while to figure out what was going on in this image (well actually, they’re almost all videos) but it’s an awesome visual trick. The rest of Michael Guidetti’s work is along the same vein. Kind of 2D into 3D…so 2.5D?

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The Future Of Painting: An Amazing New Method To Paint 3D Printed Surfaces

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A brand new method for painting 3D objects may just revolutionize the way our cups, shoes, masks, vases, or car parts are decorated. Basically any type of object – and not necessarily a 3D printed one, can undergo this process, and come out with a multicolored pattern transferred onto it’s surface. Researchers from Hangzhou’s Zheijiang University and NYC’s Columbia University ave come up with this idea, one that they call computational hydrographic printing.

Hydrographic printing isn’t entirely a new thing – in the past, patterns were applied onto a thin film of plastic sitting on a body of water. The object was then dipped into the water, through the adhesive-soaked film. The trouble with that method is that the pattern was stretched around the sides of the item, warping and ruining the design. It could never yield consistent results. But this is the difference now:

….what they do is 3-D scan whatever object they want to print on before they dunk it. Algorithms then take whatever pattern you want to paint on it, and print it on the layer of transparent film in such a way that, when lowered into the water bath by a robotic arm, the pattern will be applied perfectly, every time. (Source)

With this method, you can repeatedly dunk the item, and decorate multiple sides, without the pattern getting screwed up. Be sure to watch the video to watch the whole incredible process. (Via Fast Code Design)

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Benoit Jammes’ Amusing Skateboarding Fruits And Veggies

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Benoit Jammes attaches miniature skateboard wheels to fruits and vegetables and send them to do daring tricks and flips around the kitchen. In the series, he has an apple carve a bowl, a tomato splat after a jump, and a cut potato fly over a spoon. The images are playful, crisp, and colourful. He writes about the series: “Kickflip and nosegrind between the pan and the olive oil. The secret sporting life of our friends the fruits and vegetables.” (Bizarre Beyond Belief) Each vegetable does seem to have its own personality affected by size, colour, and the levels of daring of each stunt. The yellow bell pepper appears to be one of the more courageous of the bunch, riding the side of an oven door. If you look closely, you can see a small bit of smoke trailing off him/her (?), which is a great, little detail.

Jammes lives and works in “more or less Paris” according to his website. He does design, painting, photography, and drawing. His sense of humour and great use of household objects exists throughout his practice. In another series, he uses cassettes for various scenarios. One is made to look like pacman, another like a strange popsicle at the waters edge of a beach. (Via Bizarre Beyond Belief)

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Jean-Francois Fourtou’s Giant people for a tiny world

Jean-Francois Fourtou’s photographs go back and forth between miniature worlds for giant people and tiny people living in giant worlds.

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Anna Bellman’s Cut Paper Street Maps Puts A Minimalist Spin On Cartography

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Anna Maria Bellman intricately translates cartography into her own unique style by simplifying their elements into positive and negative space. She cuts precise slices into paper, constructing sections of maps of cities all over the world. Each hand cut incision represent paths on a map, building up the framework for a city. The artist’s work is heavily influenced from her extensive travels. Originally hailing from Germany, she has adventured to an impressive amount of cities including London, Berlin, New York, Paris, and Rome, just to name a few. All of these incredibly complex and diverse cities are represented in her work as a black and white composition of crisscrossing lines, intersecting and forming the streets and rivers.

Many of her cutout maps do not even appear as such, but rather an abstract grid of geometric lines, forming different shapes and patterns like tapestries. When the light shines through Anna Bellman’s maps, you can see their shadows creating a three-dimensional affect. Having explored more wilderness destinations as well, Bellman’s other works are highly floral and inspired from lush nature. Her nature-filled works include amazing patterns cut by hand, as intricate and delicate as those found naturally in the wild. Although Anna Bellman’s body of work can represent two ends of the spectrum, nature and city, the continuous monochromatic choice of using white paper unifies her brilliant work.

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Rooms Become Massive Balloons in the Installations of Penique Productions

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The Spanish collective Penique Productions creates massive installations that at the same feel nearly weightless.  Using fans and colored plastic the collective entirely covers a selected space in a bright hue.  Though the concept is relatively simple, the space feels totally transformed.  The space and its furnishings are stripped of all their details and reduced to a set of shapes.  Penique’s Productions create an interesting way to investigate familiar places.  Interestingly the collective says regarding the installations:

“It works the relationship between fullness and emptiness, creating a dialogue with the space it temporarily inhabits.”

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