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Joakim Ojanen’s Hallucinatory Mass Paintings

Stockholm, Sweden based artist Joakim Ojanen works in mediums as diverse as sculpture and zines.  His paintings, however, particularly standout.  Familiar snippets of cartoon characters, body parts, and shapes congeal as a hallucinatory mass.  Normally lighthearted characters appear to be in a paranoid panic or a manic giddiness.  Eyeballs peek from oddly placed holes or simply roll on the ground.  Ojanen’s portraits don’t seem to depict monsters as much as characters mutated by abstraction.

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Art Legend Mike Kelley Dies

 

One of the most iconic artists of our time Mike Kelley passed away today at the age of 58. With over four decades of activity within the international art world spanning dozens dozens of museum shows, several art noise bands, and multiple Whitney Biennial inclusions,  Kelley will be sorely missed by the art community. Watch an interview with Kelley about his work after the jump.

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Lucas Simoes Cavernous Collaged Portraits

These cavernous collaged photographs by  Brazilian artists Lucas Simoes are the result of a series of interviews with his subjects. Read more about Lucas’ process after the jump.

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Luis Dourado’s Departure series

Luis Dourado‘s Departure series’ digital manipulation of photography contorts and distorts geography to explore the power of imagination. The photographs of Spanish and Portugese mountains are regarded as departures away from civilisation, as the once formidable are changed into beautiful geometric patterning by Douardo’s imaginative capability. More after the jump.

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Network Osaka

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Network Osaka is a graphic designer. That’s pretty much all I know about him or her. I don’t think they’re from Japan. They’re either from California or Mexico. Past that, Network Osaka has done some really nice print work, often employing a straightforward modernist aesthetic without seeming too derivative of the old masters.

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Sink Or Swim- Alex Seton’s Life-Like Inflatable Rafts Made Out Of Marble

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

You may have seen Alex Seton‘s previous work: lightweight pieces of clothing, heaped casually in a corner, draped on a pair of hangers — and carved from marble. Seton’s sculptures are incredibly hyper-realistic, creating an illusion of malleability and texture that insists on a closer look. In his latest exhibit, “Someone Died Trying to Have a Life Like Mine,” Seton again uses cold, hard marble to replicate objects that would float rather than sink: inflatable rafts, palm trees, and life jackets.

This contrast is part of what Seton is exploring with his art; the depth and contradiction of the objects he portrays and their actual substance. In an interview with the gallery Sullivan+Strumpf, Seton says, “There’s no easy read on these objects. They are both an optimistic and shining series of objects, but they’re also sardonic, they also have a darker side.” The installation addresses the complex topic of those who seek asylum, largely by risking death by sea or other means, only to be turned away.

“Each of these is both inflated and deflated; each of these is welcoming and unwelcoming. How do you justify shattering a life?” Seton asks. “Or a desire or a dream? How do you do that? And what are the long-term impacts of that?”
The objects around him, which appear in a kind of memorialized limbo, have no answer for him. They are frozen by stone and time.

“Someone Died Trying to Have a Life Like Mine” can be seen September 16th to October 11th, 2014 at Sullivan+Strumpf in Sydney, Australia. (via Design Boom)

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Rad, Dude: Michael Galinsky’s Photographs Captures Malls From the 80’s

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Photographer Michael Galinsky’s series Malls Across America captures what we simultaneously love and hate about the mall. Stale air, artificial light, and swarms of teenagers are all captured in photographs from 1989. It was in the 1980’s and 1990’s that these places were at the height of popularity and a bastion of consumerism; Galinsky’s photos now is like digging up a time capsule.

Malls Across America began in the winter of 1989 at the Smith Haven Mall in Garden City Long Island. Galinsky travelled from North Carolina to South Dakota, Washington State and beyond photographing malls. We can look at this series as a source of amusement and anthropological study. There are ostentatious 80’s fashions (a lot of big hair) and the beginnings of 90’s grunge.

In many of these photographs, we are the voyeur. I get the feeling that Galinsky took these photographs on the sly, trying to be inconspicuous about it. He captures images through plants, behind people on escalators, and standing outside stores as women are conferring about clothing choices. Because Galinsky makes us both the voyeur and the viewer, I can’t help but feel a little bad for spying. But, considering all the 80’s movies that included mall hijinks, it feels oddly fitting.

These malls still exist, they are just dead. My hometown mall still looks eerily familiar to what’s in these photographs. If this series makes you feel nostalgic for your own mall, you can buy a book of Galinsky’s work. Aptly titled, Malls Across America, it was released this past summer. (Via It’s Nice That and Gizmodo)

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The Unaltered Photography of Matt Perrin

Matt Perrin believes in the magic of classic photography.  Perrin decidedly does not use Photoshop or manipulate his photographs once the shutter clicks.  Rather, he fully utilizes the simple features of his camera and experimental lighting to create his dreamy images.  His photographs glow like cosmic abstractions.  Perrin is intentionally ambiguous as to the exact nature of his subject matter.  Rather, he encourages a more open reading similar to abstract painting.  He says of his process:

” Any object seen, in any photograph, was physically in front of the lens when the shutter opened and closed. It’s the twists and turns that have occurred between those points that have brought you here today.”

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