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LYNDSEY LESH: THE ART OF THE RATTLING WALL- This Saturday!

B/D pal  Lyndsey Lesh recently created a series of illustrations for The Rattling Wall, a literary journal published by the PEN Center USA & Narrow Books. To kick off the books release Lyndsey has teamed up with our favorite alternative art venues Synchronicity Space for a one night show of artworks from the book. Come see a selection of works by Ms. Lesh, get a signed copy of the book, and eat some free Strawberry Chardonnay Ice cream from LA’s best ice cream shop Scoops! If doing all the artwork for the book wasn’t enough Lyndsey decided to add more work to her plate by creating a writing and drawing process blog of her very own called Off Thee Wall. Read more about Off The Wall and see more of Lyndsey’s illustrations after the jump.

LYNDSEY LESH: THE ART OF THE RATTLING WALL
featuring the art pieces from the journal’s second issue.
Synchronicity Space | 7-10 PM
713 N. Heliotrope,
Los Angeles, CA 90029

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The Fluorescent Cold Photography of Mate Moro

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The work of Hungarian photographer Mate Moro is cool, nearly cold.  His photographs carry an modern fluorescent cold – even the bodies of his subjects don’t lend much heat.  They nearly seem to act as objects just as other objects in the images interact with the scene.  Slightly surreal, his work is disconcerting like a waking dream in which something is vaguely out of place.  Moro has a talent for composition – coupled with obscured faces the viewers eye never seems to settle on just one place in the photograph.

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Kunihiko Nohara Creates Sculptures That Hang Between The Earth And Sky

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Kunihiko Nohara creates lofty sculptures whose subjects hover between the earth and sky. Using a single piece of wood for each of his pieces, Nohara replaces clothing with clouds making his figures seem ready to take flight in a hot air balloon.

Nohara’s works have earned him the name “The Cloud Man” in Taiwan. But while this name visibly connects him with his works, the clouds also mean something else to Nohara. In interviews he says that clouds are emblematic of his practice in that he often feels “blurry” within his own thoughts. Dealing with this space of fuzziness between thoughts and dream, he further says that his “creations are not necessarily based on fantasy, but neither are they overly grounded in reality – they’re just reflections of my experiences of the world.”

Despite the delicacy and softness of these sculptures, Nohara works entirely in wood and, more notably, only uses one piece for each work. His preference for wood emerged in school but he also believes the use of material aligns his work with Japan’s propensity towards wooden objects, like houses and furniture.

Nohara’s works were recently shown at “Laissez Faire,” a group show presented by Gallery UG at the Luxe Art Museum in Singapore. His sculptures were included with works from 17 other Japanese artists.

Quotes from: expatliving.sg

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Video Watch: KOKOFREAKBEAN’s Glitch Pixel World

I love myself some glitchy experimental videos that don’t make much sense but transport me to a surreal neon coated world. This is the world of KOKOFREAKBEAN. Watch and enjoy!(via triangulation)

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Matt Phillips’ Vibrant Abstract Paintings Reflect Poetic Notions Of The Everyday

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Brooklyn based artist Matt Phillips creates colorfully complex paintings that act as vibrant odes to the ordinary. Phillips’ practice meditates on his comprehensive observance of classic aesthetics, including modernist abstraction, folk art, and African textiles. Drawing notes from these traditions, his paintings meld low and high brow art, creating contemporary pastiches that are just as colloquial as they are clever.

Phillips’ uses notions of pattern, textile, and the decorative to hint at referential codes that allow the abstract to take on tangible, even comforting forms. It is the moment in which each work switches from foreign to recognizable, that invites in humor and endearing relatability. For example, his piece Bungalow (Spring) depicts a warm tonality along soft river blues on a overtly sunny day, and hums the delicate, independent flow of a melodic riddle.

The artist paints with a pigment and silica blend — this mixture results in each brush stroke becoming dry instantaneously. Due to the lack of forgiveness within this process, his work not only speaks about the traditional observation of light, but also to economical choices and purposeful mark making. Although each painting begins as a mapped geometrical formation, his method of building composition pushes through routine constructs of painterly semantics and becomes playful with common structures such as the grid. Phillips has a true touch for quiet beauty and perfected moments of yearned memories.

Check out Matt Phillips’ spectacular solo show, Comfort Inn, at Steven Harvey Fine Arts Projects in New York, running until February 6th. The exhibition is taking over both of the gallery’s two locations located at 208 Forsyth Street and 237 Eldridge Street.

To see more of Matt Phillips’ work, take a look at his website or follow him on Instagram.

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Philippe Constantinesco

Lovely pencil illustrations and sketches by Philippe Constantinesco.

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Oscar Cahen and Gershon Iskowitz at Horton Gallery

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Cahen: "Traumoeba" 1956

Oscar Cahen and Gershon Iskowitz contributed to the mid-20th century modernist movement with their joyous, colorful works despite the devastation they experienced in WWII. Horton Gallery of New York’s Lower East Side will be exhibiting these works July 9th to September 8th.

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Lee Hadwin Creates Art While Sleepwalking

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Some artists are so talented they seem to be able to do it in their sleep.  Lee Hadwin, though, can only do it in his sleep.  Since he was an early teenager, Hadwin would draw or paint on tables, walls, clothes all while sleep walking.  While awake he would show no sign of interest or talent in art making.  Now Hadwin is prepared at night – he sets art materials aside before going to bed.  Much of his work is elegantly simple, while other pieces are strangely intricate.  Peculiar symbols and recurring shapes seem to appear in much of his work making one wonder whats going on in the mind of sleeping Lee Hadwin.

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