Get Social:

Interview: Erik Sandberg

glamour_panel_6

Erik Sandberg likes his school-children pink and side show circus hairy-faced and his romantic floral arrangements with eggs hollandaise. Eat your heart out, Dutch “pronk” still lives- Sandberg even has a steak with his bouquet. His paintings look like a great/horrible place to spend a hungover Sunday. Read the full interview after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Century Old Antarctic Negatives Discovered And Restored By Conservationists

frozenphotography frozenphotography4

In December, New Zealand’s Antarctic Heritage Trust released their discovery and restoration of photographic cellulose nitrate negatives that were clumped together in a box and found in expedition photographer Herbert Ponting’s darkroom in Captain Scott’s last expedition at Cape Evans. As part of the Ross Sea Heritage Restoration Project, the trust recovered 22 images from Ernest Shackleton’s 1914-1917 Ross Sea Party, including a striking image of Alexander Stevens, Shackleton’s Chief Scientist, standing aboard the Aurora, the expedition’s ship. Though many of the photographs are damaged and the identity of the photographer is unknown, landmarks around McMurdo Sound were recognizable to the Antarctic Heritage Trust.

So far, more than 10,000 objects have been conserved at Captain Scott’s Cape Evans hut. Four years ago, the same conservation group discovered 3 crates of whiskey and 2 crates of brandy under Shackleton’s 1908 base. (via npr)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jewelry Collection Featuring Dust Particles Disintegrates And Decays Over Time

Ágústa-Sveinsdóttir-Design-1 Ágústa-Sveinsdóttir-Design-2 Ágústa-Sveinsdóttir-Design-3 Ágústa-Sveinsdóttir-Design-4

A jewelry collection by Icelandic designer Ágústa Sveinsdóttir explores the transience of all earthly pursuits by incorporating one unusual material, dust. Her metallic wearables allow their owners to experience the transformation and disintegration as the jewelry changes and decays over time.

“In this world everything existing is linked to the process of birth, decay and disappearance. That is the way of life, the way of nature. Inspired by the tradition of the symbolic Vanitas paintings, the Dust collection is a reminder of the transience of all earthly pursuits and how it can be a motive for design.”

Designer wanted to break the traditions of material use and employ materials that have been considered worthless. She chose dust as the ultimate result of disintegration: “It’s everywhere and ever-present <…> It is everything and yet metaphorically the embodiment of nothingness.” Sveinsdóttir questions the material worth by juxtaposing jewelry, a sign of beauty and wealth, and dust, an inconvenient mundane matter that people always try to get rid off. 

The dust was collected from abandoned Icelandic farms. Designer pursued to find dust at its purest form, thus derelict places where time has stopped, man has left and nature has taken over were perfect. Using a biodegradable adhesive, dust particles were transformed into a jewel coating and used to cover the metallic bangles and rings. With time, the dust fades away unveiling the manmade skeleton of the object. (via designboom)

Currently Trending

Rest In Peace Steve Jobs

It’s a sad day for anyone that enjoys groundbreaking technology, clean design, and revolutionary thinking. Since 1996 I’ve used Apple  products to create Beautiful/Decay and have loved every minute of it. Every time I think  Apple can’t  push the envelope further they do. Without  Steve Jobs my life would not be the same and chances are yours wouldn’t be either. So lets take a moment to celebrate the life of Steve Jobs and honor his work. Rest In Peace Steve.

 

 

Currently Trending

Lisa Hanawalt

Lisa Hanawalt just may be my new favorite artist.  She is a cartoonist and illustrator living in Brooklyn, New York.  I love how she takes the mundane and puts a grotesque spin on it.

Currently Trending

Nicola Samorì Corrupts Art History

Nicola Samorì makes seductive, profound paintings by layering and fusing images on canvas, wood or copper and then obliterating them by scratching, erasing, fingering and painting over the surfaces multiple times. By violating the golden rule of all museums (“Please do not touch the artwork.”) Samorìis making art history by corrupting his own work and imposing a new Samorì on top. The resulting layers of paint create a new skin that bears the bruises and permanent marks of all prior creative efforts.
Selecting portraits and still life’s from classical paintings but also sourcing random faces and images from the Web, Samorì is engaged in a project about time and corrosion.

Currently Trending

Robin Eley’s Hyper-Real Paintings Dissect The Human Body With Fractals Of Color

Robin Eley - Oil on LinenRobin Eley - Oil on LinenRobin Eley - Oil on Linen

Unbelievably, the stunning and incredibly realistic works of artist Robin Eley are not photographs, but meticulously created paintings! The artist uses oil paint to render hyper-real portraits with fragmented hues and picturesque, nude figures.  Each figure looks so photorealistic, it is hard to believe that it is a painting. Every last element is executed perfectly, as you can even see every detail in the tattoos on the figures. As if painting realistic nudes with this high level of skill was not impressive enough, Eley displays his figures through fractals of color, as if they are behind stained glass. The geometric shapes cutting through the composition offer us a stark juxtaposition to the organic, soft bodies that are behind them. This sharp pattern dissects the human body into segments so that we may see it in a different light.

Eley not only paints his figures behind brightly colored, intersecting shapes, but also wrapped in materials like plastic. This highly textural element also gives an interesting contrast to the bare skin of the figures. The crinkles and creases in the plastic create a sort of fractured impression, just like Eley’s pieces with the “stained glass.” Originally from Australia, this L.A-based artist has had his work exhibited internationally and also has work in private collections all over the world. If you have the chance to see Eley’s prolific work in person, make sure to take advantage of it and experience every tiny detail of these hyper-real paintings.

Currently Trending

Stephanie Calvert Transforms Decades Of Trash Collected By Her Hoarder Parents Into Sculptures

Stephanie Calvert - Sculpture 1 Stephanie Calvert - Sculpture 6

Stephanie Calvert - Sculpture 9

Discovering Stephanie Calvert’s artwork is entering her world of shame. To break free from the memories left from her childhood, the feeling of discomfort due to her parent’s hoarding and her denial through all these years; she has come up with large sculptures on which she accumulates the symbols of her heavy past.

Stephanie Calvert was raised in a school house in the middle of a prairie in Colorado. With no electricity or hot water, she grew up feeling embarrassed of her living situation. Her parents were hoarders, piling up junk in every corner of the house. After she, her siblings and parents left their home town to pursue their life, the school house was left abandoned, in the middle of the prairie.

The artist eventually moved back for a while to explore the house ruins and the deep hole it had created inside of her. White taking care of her mother who had encountered a severe bike accident, Stephanie Calvert decided she needed to rekindle with her family, therefore her past. This process meant that she would have to dig into herself and face the feelings she had avoided during all these years. She went back to the school house and lived there, back to her childhood lifestyle. She then started to create, paint, collage and carve; letting out harsh feelings on the canvas. The sculptures are the expression of her past, shame and hope. They imitate the hoards she witnessed, although this time they represent the future, a message of promise and optimism to the ones that can relate to her story.

Stephanie Calvert is currently looking to exhibit in NYC next November 2015.

Currently Trending