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Moon Hoon’s Home Library Slide

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If you were similarly a nerd-child, this home library would have been better than any I could conjure.  Architect Moon Hoon designed this extremely family friendly house.  The spaces throughout the house are very versatile with this library being its highlight.  Embedded in the bookshelves is a wooden slide.  Also, the shelves double as tiered seating for the home theater.  Moon Hoon says of the feature:

“The multi-use stair and slide space brings much active energy to the house, not only children, but also grown ups love the slide staircase. An action filled playful house for all ages.” [via]

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Dont Shop ‘Til You Drop


In honor of Black Friday, here are some electric shopping slogans and abstracted commodities by Sylvie Fleury. What will you shop for today? Or not? Shoes. Ohmigod Shoes. Let’s get some shoes.

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Nicolas Jolly’s Stunning Drawings Made With Thousands Of Fingerprints

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Through some intense thought and focus, French artist Nicolas Jolly meticulously pieces together thousands upon thousands of tiny black streaks (from his finger imprints) in order to create a cohesive image. The end product comes to be this series of eerie landscape scenes that take inspiration from the early works of the symbolist movement.

Jolly’s practice involves the alterations, in width and length, of his finger markings in order to simulate light, shadows, and shape. When viewed from afar, the images seem whole with a magnificent sense of movement and texture. Jolly’s ability to create figurative work with small abstract markings is, clearly, quite remarkable.
(via My Modern Met)

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Wolfgang Laib Makes Art With Yellow Pollen Fields




German conceptual artist Wolfgang Laib creates his installations from natural materials displayed in very unnatural ways. In “Pollen from Hazelnut,” Laib collected pollen from the area around his studio for over 23 years. In the gallery, he carefully sifted the rich yellow powder into a saturated rectangular field. He says,

“I wanted to have this very intense, concentrated experience … with the pollen. So, the meadow with flowers where I collect the pollen is something very different from how you see it here, a real concentrated experience without any distractions, nothing else.” (Source)

Traditionally, conceptual art is primarily concerned with ideas—aesthetics are mainly disregarded. Laib’s pollen fields are unusual in that they have a strong conceptual basis, yet they’re also lovely and striking. The geometric shapes, as large as 380 square feet, have been described as a “vast luminous field of color” and “a blanket of pure pigment.”

Interestingly it is in the collection of the pollen and the amassed pollen itself where Laib finds the most meaning. The sifting onto the floor is almost irrelevant to him. This exchange is from an interview in The Journal of Contemporary Art

Ottmann [interviewer]: Your pollen pieces are for sale. If a collector wants to own one how exactly does that work?

Laib: He buys three jars of pollen and it’s his choice of keeping it in the jar or to get rid of his furniture and spread it out on the floor.

Ottmann: Would you go to his home and do that?

Laib: Yes, but of course I would be even happier if he would do it himself.

Some critics of the work are concerned with Laib’s “waste” of natural materials. This is not a concern for Laib, who, although he works with natural materials, does not consider himself a naturalist. It’s important to remember that the pollen is gathered by hand over a long period of time, not mass harvested, denuding the environment in one obscene swoop. From concept to exhibition, every aspect of Laib’s work displays patience, precision, and peace.

Read more about Wolfgang Laib on PBS’s wonderful Art21 website and look out for his episode airing soon!

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Raymond Lemstra

Illustrator, Raymond Lemstra, acts to create a bridge that brings together the youth and the mature through his illustrations. His nostalgia for the sense of wonder we all experienced consistently in our childhood inspires him to create a world in which his audience might find the inspiration, and imagination to re-live that sensation once again.

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Our Mega Mystery Pack Sale Ends March 15th!

Don’t forget to take advantage of our big Mystery Pack sale. For one week only we’re slashing our already discounted Mystery Packs for both magazines and t-shirts. This is your chance to save a bundle of cash, get a killer surprise package in the mail, and have fun all at once. It’s like Beautiful/Decay throwing you a surprise party and giving you the best gift ever! Sale ends March 15th!

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Aleksandra Mir’s Plane Landing

Aleksandra Mir’s Plane Landing is a sculpture of an airplane in a permanent state of landing. On October 20,21,22 and 23 it appeared at various locations in central Paris.

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Eddy De Azevedo Recreates Rothko Paintings From Discarded Lighters

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Eddy De Azevedo used discarded lighters he had found and assembled them to into reimagined Mark Rothko works. Using Rothko’s color field paintings as a guide, De Azevedo created a photographic series using hundreds of lighters. He carefully collected and arranged the objects, which vary in color, size, and luminosity. When grouped together, his photographs are pleasing to look at as a whole or for their individual details.

The lighters work well as an interpretation of Rothko’s paintings. The original color fields are not flat colors, but vary in intensity, hue, and brush stroke. Much like these paintings, De Azevedo breaks up large areas of colors by staggering lighters and placing opaque and translucent ones next to each other.

De Azevedo is interested in the impact of a simple image. It’s why he is inspired by painters who work with large color fields. To him, these pieces have cross-cultural appeal. We all have a relationship to color, albeit all a different one. De Azevedo further enhances these paintings by adding objects. The lighters, paired with color, can be rich with meaning. In this way, he is creating an image that is more complex just beyond recreating Rothko’s works.

These images are just one part in De Azevedo’s series titled Walking My Dog. As the artist would go on long walks with his pet, he noticed all of the debris present along the ocean shore. He began collecting all of the scraps, which included more than 600 lighters, 1000 bottle caps, 200 fisherman gloves, and 2000 plastic bottles. De Azevedo has recycled this discard into appealing and colorful works of art. But, the staggering amount of material he has to work with is a good reminder of how much waste we actually produce, and our responsibility to take better care of the environment. (Via Feature Shoot)

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