Get Social:

Jan Dunning

Picture 24

Jan Dunning manages to transform the rudimentary device of the pinhole camera and create strange and wondrous scenes with them. I love the idea of these expansive macrocosmos unfolding from the microcosm of a single point of light…kind of baffling! I remember using a pinhole in one of my first beginning photography classes and the most I got from the lens-less, shutter-less coffee can cam was blurry black and white blobs at best.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Daniel Davidson Gets Symmetrical

B3NzRxu97R0LCGDk

Daniel Davidson makes some sweet drawings.  These mirror image eye feasts walk a fine line, and feel like the characters could either be bugging out or eerily still.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Powerfully Political Art Made From Food

three sculpture6 three sculpture3

three sculpture1

The artwork created by the Japanese art collective known as Three creates work with a political subtext as powerful as it is subtle.  Three often uses common food objects such as fish shaped soy sauce packets or candy.  For example, the installation Eat Me uses 7,000 wrapped candy pieces hung from the gallery ceiling in the shape of a house.  Visitors are encouraged to pluck candy from the installation and toss the wrapper in a corner set aside in the gallery.  Slowly throughout the day the ‘house’ of candy is transformed into a pile of trash – a symbolic recreation of the overwhelming destruction of homes by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Currently Trending

The Many Male Profiles of Stef Cook

America artist, Stef Cook has produced a series of wonderful watercolor portraits of men. The subjects are painted in their everyday clothes in profile. Take a look and study those jawlines!

Currently Trending

An Entire Kitchen Meticulous Covered In Colorful Yarn Knitting… Even The Food

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

This past year at Warwick Art Gallery in Queensland, Australia featured  a cozy site-specific installation called the Knitchen. As the name suggests, it was a kitchen adorned with knitting (some referred to it as a yarn-bombing). Yarn-covered chairs, sinks, coffee cups, and even a turkey occupied the space from July until August. This endeavor was the result of 50 artists working over the course of seven months. And, it shows. Nearly everything – from a phone cord to the label on a jam jar – is the result of a meticulous attention to detail.

Karina Devine, the Warwick’s gallery director told ABC Southern Queensland that the installation was inspired by an old-fashioned kitchen (hence the phone). “I got a new oven last year, and kept my old oven so I could wrap my oven,” Devine said. “The most exciting part for me was creating the crocheted gas flame, and hand sewing the orange flecks.That gives me a little bit of a kick every time I see it.” (Via Lustik and ABC Southern Queensland)

Currently Trending

Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

Currently Trending

Made With Color Presents: Scott Greenwalt’s Fantastical Cosmic Worlds

Scott Greenwalt

Unknown-2

Scott Greenwalt -6

This week we’re bringing you another talented artist as part of our partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color. Each week we bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who are using Made With Color to create clean and sleek websites that are optimized for desktop, mobile, and tablet. Made With Color sites aren’t just good looking, they also feature powerful yet simple backend which allows anyone to create a professional site with just a few clicks.This week we are excited to share the detailed paintings of Scott Greenwalt.

Oakland based painter Scott Greenwalt’s dense paintings sway back and forth between abstraction and representation in a nervous frenzy. With references to cosmic galaxies and the human nervous system, his otherworldly paintings weave both the familiar and the unknown through one another creating ornate futuristic worlds.

“Scott Greenwalt presents images that illustrate with an uncanny precision the palpable horror of our physical situation. And like the alchemists of old, he instills in the work an element of the mysterious, a fantastical imagining of our souls and bodies transformed in matter and energy.

The result is landscapes and portraits populated and magnetized by cloudy æther, sinewy, degraded and corporeal fragile forms, fine filaments of hair and flesh transmutated by rays of energy streaming from eyes and orifices. The work captures a moment of profound fantastical physical change and refer to a thing larger than that what we can see with our own eyes, a nightmarish dimension of the alchemist’s gaze made manifest in all its magnificent terror.” – weekend

Currently Trending

Erika Sanada’s Beautifully Creepy Sculptures Of Mutant, Dream-like Animals

Erika Sanada - Sculpture Erika Sanada - Sculpture Erika Sanada - Sculpture Erika Sanada - Sculpture

Erika Sanada is a Tokyo-born, San Franscico-based sculptor whose supernatural animal creations traverse the boundary between dream and nightmare. In many ways, her creatures seem soft and gentle — the colors are pale, the textures soft. However, many are riddled with terrifying bodily anomalies: dogs with several rows of fangs, others writhing in agony and tearing at their own skin, and mutant birds bursting out of torsos and faces. The blank, dead eyes of the animals further add to their moral ambivalence; without the pupil — that center of consciousness — their eyes could be those of a gentle, all-seeing spirit, or of the soulless undead.

Whether it is their eyes, human-like skin, or abnormalities (some of the animals appear to be painfully conjoined to others), Sanada’s creations rattle with uneasiness; they are both endearing and unsettling in their suffering and strangeness. In her Artist Statement, Sanada identifies her own experiences with anxiety as the source of her inspiration. “I worry about everything, even tiny things,” she writes. “Anxiety drags my mind to the dark side, which is more powerful and intense than my bright side.” Instead of being paralyzed by such fears, Sanada decided to confront them by molding them into beautiful, hideous life; it is her way of gaining control over her anxiety — and indeed, in embracing her own darkness and transforming it into art.

Sanada recently exhibited at Antler Gallery in Portland, Oregon, and will be showing again at the Flower Pepper Gallery in Pasadena, California, this Februrary. Check out Sanada’s website for a stunning gallery of her beautiful and tortured dream-creatures. (Via Design Faves)

Currently Trending