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Photographer Creates Breathtakingly Vivid Gradients By Arranging Food By Its Pigment And Stage Of Life

Brittany Wright - PhotographyBrittany Wright - Photography

Brittany Wright - Photography

The photography of cooking enthusiast and photographer Brittany Wright simply and beautifully displays the natural range of hues held by various types of fruits and vegetables. The Seattle-based photographer states that she has a goal to learn how to cook everything and anything. Sharing cooking ideas and recipes online, Wright began photographing the ingredients to share as well. This love of experimentation with ingredients and flavors eventually lead to photographing the produce, starting her series titled Food Gradients. She arranges each edible item in rows, columns, and clusters according to their pigment or size, which is often attributed to the stage of lifecycle the specific food is in.

Some of the fruits and vegetables Wright chooses for her rainbows of ingredients naturally have a wide variety of colors, like apples ranging from deep reds to bright yellows. Others, however, are discolored for a different reason, because they are rotting and dying. Many of her Food Gradients brilliantly display the lifecycle of the item, showing the beginning of its life all the way to its elegant death. Because of her subject, you would think Wright’s inspiration comes from food photography, but because she sees food and cooking as a creative and artistic outlet, she finds more inspiration from abstract art. (via Faith is Torment)

” I see food as an art, and an opportunity to do something creative.”


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A Project Called Capsula Mundi Wants To Make Trees Out Of Dead People

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A final resting place for you and your loved ones just got a little cooler. Instead of a tomb you could now become part of a tree. An innovative project called Capsula Mundi from the minds of Italian designers Anna Citelli and Raoul Bretzel have developed a concept that would combine the deceased with a young tree that would eventually grow into a living memorial. It will change the way we visit loved ones who have gone on to the great beyond. Instead of cemeteries we could now visit the deceased in beautiful forests as an alternative, a more civilized, celebratory, and positive way to remember. Presently, we reflect on thoughts and artifacts when a person dies. Perhaps soon we will be able to watch them grow and become part of a living organism again.

The body would be placed in a pod-like sack underneath a seed or sapling in a fetal position. As it transforms it will provide nutrients which will allow the tree to grow and in a sense become one with it. The project has not been officially approved in Italy yet since legislation prohibits cemeteries without proper burial case. The people at Capsula Mundi are looking to change this and make their concept a reality. Once they do it will start a new and wonderful way we can continue to love those we’ve lost with a little help from mother nature. (via boredpanda)

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Pae White’s Rover Momentum

Pae White often uses graphics and decals in her works and she has produced a series of graphic treatments, unique to each vehicle, entitled ‘Rover Momentum’, using an interpretation of the dusks and dawns of the countries represented at the Fair. Her designs create a striking and dynamic ‘vehicle’ for the Fair as the vehicles move across London during the days of the exhibition. 

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Michael L. Abramson’s Unseen Photographs Of Chicago Nightlife In The 1970’s

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The posthumous exhibition of Michael L. Abramson’s work, titled, “Michael L. Abramson: Pulse of the Night,” features previously unseen photographs from night clubs in Chicago in the 1970’s. The grainy black and white shots highlight a side of Chicago that had been previously undocumented. The exhibition is co-presented by the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Columbia College Chicago Library.

Abramson, who died three years ago, shot on a Leica and spent a lot of time shooting in Chicago’s South Side, where he compiled work for his book “Light: On The South Side,” of which this work is a continuation of. Often compared to Brassai, who photographed the Parisian nightlife scene, Abramson showed a new side of Chicago. Abramson has work in the permanent collections of many institutions, such as the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago History Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, and the California Museum of Photography.

This show will be up through December 19th at the Columbia College Chicago Library.

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Jenine Shereos Human Hair Leaves


In Jenine Shereos’ series Leaf the intricacies of a leaf’s veining are recreated by wrapping, stitching, and knotting together strands of human hair.  Inspired by the delicate and detailed venation of a leaf, Shereos began stitching individual strands of hair by hand into a water- soluble backing material. At each point where one strand of hair intersected another, she stitched a tiny knot, so that when the backing was dissolved, the entire piece was able to hold its form.

The complex network of lines present in this work mimics the organic patterns found in nature and speaks to the natural systems of transformation, growth and decay. Allusions to the vascular tissue of plants, as well as the vascular system of the human body, exist simultaneously; the delicate trace of a hair falling silently, imperceptibly, from one’s head becoming the veins of a leaf as it falls from a tree leaving its indelible imprint on the ground below. (via oddity central )


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James Esber: You, Me, and Everybody Else

James Esber, a New York based artist, will be featured at the Pierogi Gallery in his new show: You, Me, and Everybody Else. James is known for addressing, through his work, the notions of distortion and perception. Colorful, incredibly wacky, but always engaging. So if you’re in the area, make sure to join James Esber this Friday Nov. 19th for the opening of You, Me, and Everybody Else at the Pierogi Gallery, located at 177 N 9th Street Brooklyn NY 11211.

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Morgan Faye’s Fairytale

Morgan Faye’s illustrations take you to a far away land full of wonder and mystery.

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Violence, Death, The Holocaust And McDonald’s

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Jack and Dinos Chapman’s latest installation is currently on view in Hong Kong. The work is comprised of four dioramas depicting historical events with miniature figures. Violence, holocaust, and death pervade the work, as well as commercial images of characters from McDonald’s. This creates a landscape rife with gritty humor and heavy irony. This work evokes a level of discomfort that is shockingly arresting. Jake says, “It’s as pessimistic as we can make it but it’s pessimistic in a joyful sense. Fatalistic in a joyful sense. There’s nothing foreboding about this. It doesn’t serve any kind of moral end…We take McDonald’s as being a marker of the transformation from industrialisation to the end of the world. McDonald’s once represented the idealism of fast food and the space rest era. Now it’s consistent with the dilation of the ozone and a litigious clown who’s lost his sense of humour.’”  Check out other posts we’ve done about these artist brothers here.

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