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What You Would Look Like If you Were Simultaneously A Kid And Adult

Parisian photo retoucher Cristian Girotto believes that somewhere inside each of us, there’s a young core, instinctive, creative but also innocent and naïve. He wondered “what would happen if this intimate essence would be completely revealed? ”

With the help of photographer Quentin Curtat L’ Enfant Extérieur (The Outer Child) was born, miraculously combining the innocence that are in children’s eyes with the pesky facial hair that one has to deal with as they transform into an adult. Simultaneously funny and poignant L’ Enfant Extérieur begs the question if age matters and if one can still keep the passion of youth alive in an adult world full of corruption, responsibilities and disappointment.

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Best Of 2011: Neil Mota’s Models Of The Caribbean

Neil Mota brings together the beauty of fashion photography and Pirates of The Caribbean costumes and accessories. This certainly is a tough task but Neil has managed to create an accomplished body of work that does it with ease.

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Sculptures On Colonialism And Globalization By Yinka Shonibare, MBE

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The work of Yinka Shonibare, MBE is filled with the complexity and ambiguity that make art endlessly exciting.  Born in London, Shonibare moved to Nigeria when he was three years old and later returned to London to attend college.  In a way, his work reflects this personal dynamic between Europe and Africa.  However, Shonibare’s work makes it clear that his scope is much larger than that.  He skillfully blends traditional textiles, costume, and symbolism from various European and African cultures and times.  Through his distinctive work, Shonibare has a way of exploring issues of colonialism in an increasingly shrinking world without taking away any of its complexity.  Thus, his work doesn’t inspire political reactionism, but rather sincere thought and deep consideration.

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Pierre et Gilles

So silly, you’ve got to take them seriously. This is definitely a couple steps above Sears family portraits…all glitter and magic.

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Keita Sagaki’s Classical Drawings Made Out Of Thousands Of Doodles

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Japanese artist Keita Sagaki’s intricate drawings of classical sculptures and figures are not what they appear to be. As you walk closer to the intricate drawings you’ll notice a sea of cartoonish and playful doodles that cover every inch of the drawing surface. These doodles not only differ greatly from the subject matter that you first see but they are continuously contracting and expanding to create the light and shadows in Sagaki’s pleasantly misleading drawings. (via)

“All things are composed of whole and part. For instance, The human body is built from 60 trillion cells. Moreover, Every matter is formed by an atom or a molecule. When all people live in this world, everybody belong to some organization such as a family, school, company and nation, even if we are unconsciousness. Let’s broaden your horizons. Your country is part of nations all over the world. And, The solar system including our planet is a part of the Galaxy. However, the concept of “ whole and part” is not fixed. It’s in flux. If we interpret from a different viewpoint, the wholeness which we defined is converted into the partialness. Domain in the relations of both, it never ends. The concept of my creation is the relations of borderless “whole and part”. As I draw a picture in this concept, I want to express conflict and undulation from relations of “whole and part”, cannot be measured in addition and subtraction (The whole in the grand total of the part, and the Part by the whole division.)”

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Christopher Locke’s Heartless Machines

Christopher Locke‘s sculptures combine meticulous craftsmanship and a nerdy sense of humor. My favorites are his spiders made from scissors confiscated by airport security.

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“Nature” Violently Overtakes Jess Riva Cooper’s Beautiful Ceramic Busts

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Jess Riva Cooper’s ceramic sculptures are as beautiful as they are disgusting. Her works have the viewer going back and forth between pleasure and revulsion, creating a welcome confusion to be examined. This juxtaposition of attractive and off-putting elements is not a new phenomenon in art – think Jessica Harrison’s ceramic women, and whose work we’ve featured on Beautiful/Decay – and although her artwork is also similarly violent, the aggression is expressed quite differently. Cooper’s busts are overtaken by plants, leaves, and sometimes bugs, which are often gagging or otherwise obstructing the female’s sensory capacities. The plants grow from the women’s heads, the leaves with an almost leech-like gesture extend out with determination.

It’s painful to see the women bound by nature in this way, also because, as a bust, they are without arms or hands to defend themselves. She renders the women with a great deal of skill, their expressions soft and subtle. In her artist statement she speaks about nature reclaiming its place and “a loss of control…as the parasitic entity subsumes the host” as well as her interest in sculpting the figure as a way to illustrate “physical and emotional vulnerability of the individual.” She addresses these themes plainly in her work, which is what makes it so successful and enjoyable.

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