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Will Hutnick’s Colorful Compositions

Will Hutnick - painting

Will Hutnick - sculpture

Will Hutnick - painting

Will Hutnick is a Brooklyn-based artist who works in painting, sculpture and installation.  Incorporating acrylic, oil, ink, spray paint, tape and found objects into his work Hutnick creates works on paper that oscillate between being two dimensional and three dimensional.  Using conventional materials in unconventional ways Hutnick changes the rules of painting.  Using tape as his paint and paint as his sculpture, Hutnick manages to muddy materials while maintaining brilliance in color.  Indeed, Hutnick has an amazing eye for color.  And he uses it to generate narritive.  With titles like, Marble Madness, Not So Secret Garden, and What Do You Call Those Things With The Wooden Beads And The Crazy Tracks?, Hutnick’s explosions of color become stories, emotions and sensations.

There is a fun to Hutnick’s works as well.  The paintings are bright and beautiful, but there is a sense of humor to his work.  His “balancing works,” involve late night sessions at the studio stacking any found object to the point of instability.  Eventually, the ephemeral sculptures topple to the ground.  Often, Hutnick was the only one to witness their existence at all.

Hutnick just closed a solo show, He Chutes He Scores, in Bedminster, NJ, and an artist in residence on Governors Island.  He’s curating a show called Spin? Art at Loft 594 in Bushwick opening October 5th  

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Dan Eckstein Captures The Splendor And Eccentricity Of India’s Hand Painted Technicolor Trucks

Eckstein, Photography

Eckstein, Photography

Eckstein, Photography
  Eckstein, Photography

Dually based in both Los Angeles and New York, photographer Dan Eckstein is no stranger to the inescapable traffic of a bustling metropolis. While travelling across Rajasthan’s highways and byways during a trip in 2011, however, he noticed a striking addition to the thoroughfare: highly adorned, technicolor trucks. Inspired by these shimmering “goods carriers,” Eckstein opted to create his series and book, Horn Please: The Decorated Trucks of India.

In addition to vivid paint and ornately-inscribed text—including the phrase “Horn Please,” found ubiquitously on India’s trucks and designated “the mantra of the Indian highway” by Eckstein—the trucks’ exteriors are encrusted with gleaming lights, images of deities, intricate patterns, and even portraits of pop culture staples. While the trucks boast impressive façades, their interiors are just as embellished; given the exhaustive hours and long journeys innate to this line of work, the drivers seek to be comfortable and, thus, decorate their cabins according to their unique tastes.

While highly individual, the trucks also speak to a specific culture and its highly distinctive aesthetic:

What Eckstein produced is a singular portrait of the subcontinent–distinctly Indian, and a vividly colored reflection of this country in flux between tradition and modernity. Horn Please serves as a psychedelic guide to design in India, from the hand-painted lettering covering the trucks, to the mindboggling use of color, to the specifically Indian patterns and motifs, and a showcase of the visual vernacular of the subcontinent.

Beautiful and jubilant, the decorated trucks of India are truly a feast for the eyes. (Via Slate)

Be sure to pick up your own colorful copy of Horn Please from Powerhouse or Amazon!

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Huge Installation Art Reverses Production And Consumption Process

Ni Haifeng installation art

Ni Haifeng installation art

Ni Haifeng installation6

In his giant installation art / performance Para-Production, artist Ni Haifeng reverses the common global process of production.  A massive movement of commodities takes place each day often beginning in the country of Ni Haifeng’s birth – China.  Many companies defer production of their goods to the country which are then often exported for consumption in the Western world.  In Para-Production, however, a large room is filled with loose garments and sewing machines.  Gallery visitors are then invited to work, to sew these items together.  In a way, the installation becomes a performance of labor – people that are often the consumer of Chinese-made products instead produce a product for a Chinese artist. [via]

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David Maisel’s Mines

David Maisel’s aerial photographs of open mines questions  how human activity transforms land through industrial effort. Although beautifully photographed these images are reminders of how we destroy and pollute our planet for money and power.

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Tabitha Soren’s Photos Depict Moments Of Departure

Tabitha Soren

Tabitha Soren

Tabitha Soren

 

Tabitha Soren‘s most recent body of work, simply titled Running, is an interesting collection of photographs that capture individuals fleeing in a state of sheer panic. By withholding most of the context from these freeze-frame images, Soren leaves her audience hanging in a moment of suspended terror—with no option but to construct a narrative around each scenario she presents. Each highly cinematic snapshot resonates with an easily relatable range of human emotions, and the focus of her work as a whole is tied up in using her lens to investigate the messier moments of life.

A longtime journalist and documentarian, Soren seems comfortable working in the realm of subject matter that is slightly unresolved. “My work is about what people can survive and what they can’t,” she says. “It’s about decay, how life can be reckless, and how you have to keep going. I explore how people can pick themselves up.” It’s interesting to see how these themes play out across the series, leaving traces of vulnerability, fear and escape etched into their collective storyline.

See Soren’s work currently on view at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles.

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Artist Lee Griggs Brings Internal Fears To The Surface In His Funhouse Mirror Portraits

griggs drawinggriggs drawinggriggs drawinggriggs drawing
As if looking through a funhouse mirror where a likeness is seen in multiple forms, artist Lee Griggs creates funky portraits with the aid of 3d Scans. By distorting the face he achieves a physical illusion which plays on various fears and insecurities. Some of the faces are bloated into blockhead or more architectural shapes and through the aid of 3d Scans are manipulated into an aesthetic which bring out what someone might feel on the inside. It plays on different aspects of mood and personality which might be normally hidden and not seen. The physicality of the pieces find reference in masks but stay within strict perimeter of what is human and doesn’t divert into otherworldly fantasy. Instead it makes something fantastic out of the familiar and has a strong foothold in drawing.
Some of the specific pieces Griggs make look as if they’re about to burst from anxiety or stress. It metaphors sayings like “my head’s about to explode” and puts it in a literal sense. Some have called his drawings nightmarish which definitely holds true to some extent. There will be those who associate distortion with the unknown and therefore horror. Some actually look like the boulder-like creatures known as Gorons from the popular video game “Zelda”. When thought of in that context they lose a tiny bit of their scariness. (via thecreatorsproject)

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Darren Goins Creates Abstract Works That Reference Computers and Digital Culture

NYC-based artist Darren Goins creates work that reference the language and aesthetics of computers and the Internet. Take, for example, these paintings done on the reverse side of acrylic panels. By forcing us to view the work from behind a layer of plastic, Goins invokes the same dynamic with which we relate to our various digital devices. And the inclusion of circuit board imagery and neon lighting further adds to this element. But Goins isn’t referencing computers solely out of celebration. He’s also trying to take back some energy and focus from the technologies that dominate our lives and put them in a place that’s maybe a little more worthy:

The computer and the web can be like a filter/lack thereof, depending on how it’s used. When I begin working on new ideas for a new art object, usually some web filter has subconsciously popped into my thinking patterns- history, current events, science and technology, popular culture- tend to pile up side by side- and this can create visual dialogue or a seemingly continuous deciphering of information that continues unhinged. This can be exhausting, and, so, I often try to exhaust all in art objects, which seems to be a better place for information to be stored.

 

See more acrylic panels after the jump, and head over to the artist’s site to see works on paper and some sculpture as well.

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Malaysian Artist Jun Ong Installs A Massive Glowing Star In A Five Story Building

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Malaysian artist Jun Ong has implanted a glowing star within an unfinished five story building in the town of Butterworth, Malaysia. The awkward confinement of the large luminescent sculpture within the otherwise gaping desolate space offers an air of confusion. Almost as if the star was there by mistake, perhaps stuck. The installation was indeed informed by a notion of error — the star seems to mimic a glitch. Metaphorically, this “glitch star” represents the state of Butterworth. The town, which was once an prosperous industrial port linking the mainland and island, now finds itself desolate and suffering from decentralization. The twelve sided star, spanning over the the full five floors of the building, is comprised of five hundred meters of steel cables and LED strips. The piece is created in fragments, as it is divided by the floors of the concrete structure. When entering the installation, the viewer is forced to experience each floor as its own unit, creating a multi-faceted adventure. Each floor is an experience of just a mere piece of the whole, perhaps alluding to the overarching disposition of the town itself. However, despite the installation’s “gltich” reminiscent quality and fractured formation, the star is wondrous and uplifting. The project, presented as a part of the Urban Xchange Festival, was curated by Eeyan Chauh and Gabija Grusaite of Hin Bus Depot Art Center. (via designboom)

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