Get Social:

A Prison Is Converted Into The Gue(ho)st House

With the project “Gue(ho)st House”, French artist duo Berdaguer & Péjus  re-imagine an old French house into a fantastical architectural and sculptural visitor center. The artists used the structures rich history as inspiration (it was first a prison, then a schoolhouse and then a funeral home) to create what they describe as “Psychoarchitecture.” By covering  the house with an organic white veil that flows off the house and onto the surrounding grounds they play with the archeology of the building and its ghosts to create an architectural fantasyland. (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Sneak Peak: New Work by Bjorn Veno

bjorn_veno

 

Bjorn Veno was nice enough recently to send me a bunch of unreleased, unviewed new works that are under way right now- and he’s given me permission to unveil a little “teaser” for what is to come. The above image may form part of a new triptych series- but will not be unveiled for the next year or so.  I’ve been a long time fan of Bjorn’s quixotically expansive photography that taps into the mostly unexplored genre of masculine psychic spaces within self-portraiture. Often set within Edvard Munch-like Scandinavian emotionally charged landscapes, Veno’s photography is at once enigmatic, seductive, and  playful. He was recently the only man to win the Xto Nude Image Awards! Prior works after the jump!

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Børre Sæthre

“…By focusing on desire retold as science-fiction tableaux, theoretical constructs or fragments of myths, Sæthre taps into our need to translate raw lust into a symbolic language that conforms to socially acceptable mores.”

(via Frieze Magazine)

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Let Me Be The One You Call On

This video by Mr Kaplin & Airside Nippon for Frank Eddie kind of creeps me out. Watch it and let me know what you think after the jump.

Currently Trending

Corinne Vionnet Combines Boring Vacation Photos Into One Ethereal, Ghostly Image

Corinne Vionnet2 series "Photo Opportunities" series "Photo Opportunities" series "Photo Opportunities"

When searching for photos of popular tourist destinations, chances are many of these images look the same. Thanks to the now-ubiquitous camera phone, anyone can snap a photo anywhere. So, of course, it’s no surprise that there’s an endless amount of dull images of places like Los Angeles’ “Hollywood” sign or Rome’s Colosseum. Artist Corinne Vionnet recognized this fact years ago and crafted artworks born from banal vacation  photos. Her series is titled Photo Opportunities, and it uses at least 100 found photos layered digitally to comprise one cohesive image.

In 2005, Vionnet began searching online for pictures of tourist landmarks around the world, and she observed that most snapshots were of the existing, “stereotypical” imagery of that locale. Vantage points, lighting, visual symmetry – it all looks the same.

Photo Opportunities was recently on view at the Danziger Gallery in New York. They describe Vionnet’s pieces, writing:

Working with multiple images of different monuments, she collates around a hundred appropriated photographs for each of her layered, ethereal compositions. Underneath these beautiful ghost visions is a serious concern with how the persistence of formally repeated photographic compositions affects our cultural and historical awareness.

The Impressionist-quality of these images comment on how we experience and reflect on our environment. Even though the photo feels unique to the picture taker, it is all-too-similar and later lost in the digital ether. (Via Gawker)

Currently Trending

Dave Rowe’s Haunting Sculptures Of Broken Boardwalks And Rollercoasters

screen_shot_2015-10-28_at_82942_amscreen_shot_2015-10-28_at_83148_amscreen_shot_2015-10-28_at_83047_am screen_shot_2015-10-28_at_83124_am

Midwestern artist Dave Rowe creates sculptures of time worn structures influenced by American landscapes. His work has developed through a means to “explore history,” as he believes that addressing the change and aging of a landscape reflects not only the passage of time, but also has psychological implications about those who inhabited that change. Memories, ideologies, and personal histories are shaped by one’s surroundings. Therefore, a landscape can serve as a reflection of a collective “personal” experience. By capturing one specific physical moment, the artist allows himself to reflect not a universal or personal truth, but instead, acts as a sort of mirroring of a hyper-specific type of development. The artist re-creates recognizable, yet unspecific buildings that allude to an archival, physical space. His sculptures, focusing on geometrical infrastructures, have been shaped by his own upbringing in the American Midwest and have been influenced by the changes in the American landscape. Specifically, his work focusses on the more rural areas, as the relocation of factories have dissolved the need for industrial buildings. He captures how functionality, or rather, a lack of it, can act as a record of topographical transformation. Even his use of color is a reference to time; he pairs “barn red or tar black” along with “brighter colors evocative of graffiti,” in order to reflect the often seen palette of a forgotten edifice. Rowe creates these structures scaled to hit at eye level, allowing the viewer to enter the space emotionally, and hopes to open a discourse for personal reflection.

Currently Trending

Franco Brambilla

Mixing vintage with sci-fi

Hotel Ambasciatori

Franco Brambilla seems to have taken our most odd dreams and brought them to some kind of reality. Is it a painting? A photograph? Something else entirely, or all of the above? I love the feeling of as if I were watching To Catch a Thief or The Sound of Music on the newly-dubbed “Sy-Fy” channel.

Currently Trending

Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits Ari Fararooy - mirror portraits

Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

Currently Trending