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Hanna Von Goeler

The economy is down the pipes. Experts say its only going to get worse. But seriously, isn’t it innovative art like this we need to get this country out of this fiscal toilet? During the height of the great depression money was so valueless in Europe that people were burning it to keep warm: uncreative! 

Hanna Von Goelers work incorporates paint, collage, and money to explain cash as a cultural artifact vs. cash as a mass produced item.

A sandwich chewed in the shape of a gun; genius!

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Camilo José Vergara Documents Camden New Jersey’s Crumbling Economics

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Camilo José Vergara’s 40-year project, “Tracking Time,” chronicles urban transformation in some of the poorest and most segregated communities in the Northeastern United States. In Camden, New Jersey, one of the poorest cities he regularly visits during his documentation, he captures what he calls “Paired Houses”: two dwellings that share a wall, one of them occupied, the other empty. Because each dwelling is part of the same building, Vergara is able to capture the stark contrast between deteriorated and maintained habitats, reflecting the declining state of Camden’s housing market. For some of the photographs, Vergara returns to a building he’s previously documented in order to chronicle the absence of formerly dilapidated buildings.

In his photo essay for Slate, Vergara writes,”If a resident of a middle-class neighborhood dies or moves to a nursing home, or if a dwelling burns, the empty house is usually guarded or secured by the owner’s family. The police keep an eye out for it. Neighbors, well-aware of the impact of a deteriorating eyesore on property values, alert city officials whenever they see a house falling into disrepair. The situation is quickly brought under control.

It’s different in a crumbling inner city like Camden. Even Walt Whitman’s old house at 328 Mickle St.—the only home he ever owned—was by the 1980s adjacent to a vacant three-story dwelling and just two houses away from a ruin. House values in Camden are low and likely to remain so since the population of the city is declining, unemployment is high, and there is little new demand for houses. The number of vacant houses is likely to increase; many will eventually be acquired by the city, which is too poor either to board them up or to demolish them.”

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Mario Zanaria’s Fractured Photographs Pay Homage To The Contact Sheet

Mario-Zanaria-9 Mario-Zanaria-2 Mario-Zanaria-6 Mario-Zanaria-11 New York-based photographer Mario Zanaria started taking pictures when he was 12 years old and hasn’t stopped since. His work focuses on people, and his series Pianosequenza “a[n] homage to the contact sheet.” In it, one single image is composed over the course of one of these sheets. It’s fractured but coherent, and each assemblage reveals an alluring scene. Pianosequenza is an Italian word in cinema that translates to “long take” in English. “The idea,” Zanaria writes, “is to turn a part of a movie in one only single take, without cuts or re-plays of a scene. If everything is good in the scene than it can be taken, otherwise it will have to be taken again from the beginning.” He’s fascinated by the contact sheet, and says:

I like how they can tell stories that most often only the photographer knows. They have a very interesting double identity: an intimate relationship with the photographer, in which they are fundamental in the process of choosing the pictures that will survive the editing process, and a nearly non existent one with the public who will see the photographer work mostly only after the selection has taken place.

Zanaria’s series allow the contact sheets to be “the main and essential actor.” Without them, the image is not complete. (Via Blu)

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Jun Kitagawa’s Giant Zippers Open Up Large Public Spaces

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For the last few years, Japanese artist Jun Kitagawa has installed large zippers in public spaces. Sometimes they are painted on the wall, but more often and impressively, they are placed as sculptures in the middle of rooms and in public ponds. There, the ground looks as though it’s opening up and going to swallow you whole. Kitagawa has fashioned larger-than-life zippers, complete with his name on it (akin to the popular manufacturer YKK). Between the giant zipper’s teeth you can see what’s below, like wooden beams or most of the time, a dark void.

Kitagawa’s work plays into the wonder we have of what lies beneath the surface, and is a metaphor for making light of the unknown. The giant zipper reveals what can’t easily be seen, and what we often wish that we could. Even if the zipper is “open,” many times the artist fills it with nothing, saying that the truth or reality isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  (Via Colossal)

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KAT MARKS – LEATHER ACCESSORIES FROM THE FUTURE/PAST

Glamorous and unique leather bibs and chest plates by fashion designer Kat Marks.  Layers of color, angles, and curves give these accessories an Art Deco slant – set in some sleek distant sexy future.   This series of photographs is called The Karass: For Anais (2011) by photographer Paul Hine.

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Jakob Nylund – Just My Type

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Many thanks to Jakob Nylund/Form Conspiracy. The founder and designer of Just-My-Type is offering up amazing editable fonts to the public, free of charge. All of the typefaces on Just-My-Type are available in Illustrator AI format and we, the public are free to use and manipulate in whichever way we like. I must say, it’s nice to see such an amazing designer share their work for free. I’m interested to see how this project turns out and what the public will make of it. My personal favorites- Sorya and Pyramid. Happy fonting.

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Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via)

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Glen Baldridge & Bryan Graf @ Halsey McKay

New to the East Hampton Gallery scene is Halsey McKay, a lovely space that has presented an excellent exhibition program in the last 6 months.  Last month, the gallery had Glen Baldridge and Bryan Graf come in and do their thing.The two promising emerging artists displayed a selection of prints, photographs, and installation work. Images after the jump!

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