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Jakob Johnsen’s Dark Printed Matter

As glossy, digital, full color perfection becomes the norm on brochures and other printed matter, the photocopier has become more of an artistic medium than a simple reproduction system. Jakob Johnsen’s collages and image manipulations are sublimely composed and pull on dark, thought-provoking subject matter.

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Sarah Emerson

“In my paintings I use the violence and romantic sadness of the natural landscape to provoke a sense of fragility and melancholic instability beneath the surface of the image. I like to use a variety of images that are beautiful and sad with natural elements that can also be seen to parallel the worst parts of our human animalistic behaviors.” -Sarah Emerson

 

There is a sense in Sarah’s work of sadness and impending doom that i really enjoy.

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The “Perfect Woman”- animatronic, speechless and able to cook!

I have to admit, while the spectacle of animatronics is impressive, what struck me most about this video is the concept that the “perfect woman” not only exists, but can be created by a pair of two men….as a robot. Her purpose is for pleasing “every man, who could not find the perfect woman,” so she can “love them, understand them, while taking care of the housework.” Excuse me, but was this mindless, speechless robot-woman with unseeing plasticine-glazed eyes and pleasant vocal recognition (when spoken to) voice time warped from a futuristic 50’s, where men believed a dream woman should not actually have an opinion, but be extremely competent at massage and cooking delicious meals? Is this some kind of weird bogus Bill ‘n’ Ted time warp? (At least this robot won’t need to be medicated with speed to complete her tasks.)

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Maiden Of Ravens: The Dark And Romantic Portraiture Of Sarah Bowman

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Sarah Bowman is a photographer based in Nanaimo, Canada, whose passion for portraiture and surrealist imagery has blossomed into this darkly beautiful series, entitled Maiden of Ravens. Made in collaboration with model/visionary Annalise Silverwolf, these images present a romantic, alternative world, wherein an ethereal goddess-figure stalks through the trees and underbrush. With sticks and grasses adorning her head and her forearms covered with what appears to be gauntlets of blood, she melds beautifully with the ominous environment, invoking the spirit of ravens — those beautiful and dark carrion birds that symbolize both life and death. The model’s pale skin and dark red dress add further to the series’ grimly alluring atmosphere. Sarah has done an excellent job accentuating the green and red tones, which highlight the ghostly and rain-wet beauty of Vancouver Island’s forests and swamps.

When I chatted briefly with Sarah about her photography and future projects, she expressed a burgeoning desire to collaborate with designers in the creation of fine art portraiture, as she is inspired by “whimsical, ethereal, and surreal creations.” As an artist, her utmost goal throughout all of her work is to “please [her] viewers and hope to overachieve their expectations,” while also “collaborating with models and […] mak[ing] them feel beautiful and extraordinary about their talent.” Given the depth, intricacy, and evocative power of Maiden of Ravens, there is no doubt that Sarah has indeed achieved and surpassed her creative and professional objectives. Follow her Facebook page and check out her website to keep up with her work as she continues to collaborate with more designers and models in the creation of surrealist, fine art imagery.

Additional credits: Annalise Silverwolf (model), Christine Boulet (hair).

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Old Movie Theaters Are Transformed Into Painterly Subjects In Katherine Newbegin’s Photographs

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Katherine Newbegin creates rare beauty in photographs of old cinematic houses. Traveling throughout India she sought out these forgotten places and transformed them into celluloid dream sites. Her quest led her to the more rural areas. These out of the way places provided a history and character needed to create an interesting narrative. Behind a sensitive lens, depictions of these magnificent structures transports one back in time to a place of make believe and desire.

Each of her pictures exude a ‘if only walls could talk’ sensibility.The cracked and peeling surfaces mimic the colors seen on sari’s worn by women in that part of the world.  Perhaps the same women who once sat in the now empty seats engrossed in another’s story with dreams of their own. Instead of just focusing on the actual auditorium, Newbegin also photographed the staircases and projection rooms. In some instances, these anonymous spaces are turned into brilliant frames of abstract color. In others, film canisters and tea mugs become painterly still life subjects.

India ranks as the largest producer of films in the world and is known for its Bollywood stars. Newbegin’s quiet, intimate photographs project another side of that industry, one that appropriately preserves an important part of India’s social history.

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Daniel Lai’s Contemplative Sculpture Made from Books

 

Nice wall-mounted sculptures made from books by Tennessee via Malaysia artist Daniel Lai. The sculptures feature clay figures in “Thinker” poses positioned amongst artfully folded leaves from various books. These capture the quiet, contemplative mind-space brought on by a good read, and would make good company in any studio, study, or living room. The Internet and tablet readers are alright, but there’s something about print that just can’t be beat. Always up for a good tribute to ink on paper. (via)

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Attack Of The Giant Moths…Created From Textiles And Embroidery!

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita uses her amazing artistic skills to create colorful and large sculptures of moths and butterflies, along with other insects. This North Carolina based artist uses various techniques in textiles and embroidery to form her soft and colorful creatures. Each insect is made up of an extremely eclectic group of materials including fabric, embroidery, feathers, fabric paint, cotton, fake fur, and wire. The amount of materials, time, and skill needed to create each piece is apparent as you examine each soft and stunning creation. Not only are Okita’s moths and butterflies brightly colored to perfection, but are also much larger than life! Including wingspan, many of them measure up to nearly twelve inches.

The color of the thread used in the embroidery involved in Okita’s process may or may not be true to nature, containing bright magentas, brilliant blues, and deep greens, but create extremely eye-catching pieces none-the-less. Entomology, the study of insects, has long been popular as many people collect and display butterfly and moth specimens. Okita uses this concept and takes it to a whole new level. Instead of being pinned in a display case under glass, her “specimens” of butterflies and moths are larger than life, inviting to be touched. These fun and remarkably crafted insects can be found on Yumi Okita’s etsy sight, where you can buy one of these gorgeous specimens for yourself! (via Booooom)

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Japanese Public Uses The Power Of Memes To Respond To ISIS Threats

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Last Tuesday, the militant extremist group ISIS released a video threatening to kill two Japanese hostages, journalists Kenji Goto and Haruna Yukawa. They requested a $200 million ransom of which Japan refused to pay (Yukawa has said to have been killed). The Japanese public has responded to these threats by using Twitter to mock ISIS with Photoshopped memes. While this isn’t exactly art, elements of design, digital collage, and illustration are being used for political and social reasons. The images, viewable with the hashtag  #ISISクソコラグランプリ, translates to ISIS crappy collage grand prix. This popular tag presents exactly what it says – the terrorists, rudimentarily cut/pasted/drawn on, are seen in spaceships or cartoon characters. One image even features Mickey Mouse.

While the hashtag has received criticism from some, many see this parody as a way to react to the threat without bowing to terrorism. Peter Payne, owner of the online shop J-List, sums the hashtag up up by tweeting, “You can kill some of us, but Japan is a peaceful and happy land, with fast Internet. So go to hell.” (Via Dazed and Buzzfeed)

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