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Diederick Kraaijeveld’s Reclaimed Images

Exquisite relief sculptures by Diederick Kraaijeveld using discarded and reclaimed wood.

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Teodosio Sectio Aurea’s Meticulously Detailed Metal Sculptures Cast Unbelievable Shadows

Teodosio Sectio Aurea

Teodosio Sectio Aurea

Teodosio Sectio Aurea

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Greek artist Teodosio Sectio Aurea builds amazingly detailed sculptures that cast unassuming shadows. Aurea constructs his work out of metal and wire, bending and shaping them until they are able to cast the perfect shadow. The shadow images he casts range from human figures to recognizable art like da Vinci’s “The Vitruvian Man,” Picasso’s “Guernica,” and Michelangelo’s “The Creation of Adam.” Aurea’s talent lies in his ability to play with light and shadow, to and conceive of a multi-dimensional artwork. The metal sculptures stand alone as captivating artwork, and Aurea’s conception demonstrates multi-faceted beauty that resides within a single object. (via my modern met)

For more shadow-play sculpture work, check out Tim Noble and Sue Webster’s garbage sculptures.

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UCLA Senior Design Show 2010

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Apart from UCLA being my own alma mater, I thought I’d give a quick shout-out to the upcoming Senior Design show as it features a whopping round-up of not one, but four former fearless B/D interns, including: Matt Manos, Kate Slovin, Corinna Loo and Greg Ruben! Go team and congrats on graduating! Check it out June 3rd, 5pm at UCLA.

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An-Sophie Kesteleyn’s Photographs Of Young Children And Their Guns

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Since the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School and other tragic massacres, gun ownership and Second Amendment rights have been a site of intense controversy; on both sides of the debate, fear is a driving force, with one side arguing that guns provide protection and the other asserting that firearms cause more deaths and injuries.

How do guns factor into the lives of younger generations, born during this period of political strife? The photographer An-Sophie Kesteleyn adds to the dialogue with My First Rifle, a series of portraits of children bearing Crikett rifles, a firearm designed for children with a smaller scale and a variety of color choices. Beside each image, Kesteleyn places a torn, school-lined notebook page, onto which her subjects write their deepest fears.

Many of the .22 caliber rifles look like colorful toys; shot atop their small beds and beside Disney princess merchandise, the children appear as though caught by adults in a game of make-believe. They position their guns across their bodies in a protective manner, shielding themselves and their cozy bedrooms from the lens. The rooms, neatly ordered, maintain a certain innocence that is at times irreconcilable with the notion of a weapon intended to wound or kill.

Furthering this thread of childlike naiveté are the children’s drawings depicting their fears; these scrawling notes, touchingly misspelled, often assign terror to fictitious or extinct creatures: zombies, werewolves, dinosaurs. In this way, the artist incorporates the weapons into an elaborate realm of youthful nightmares. Depending on the viewer, this choice could either implicate NRA activists as infantile conspiracy theorists, or it could paint the world as a dangerous place wherein weaponry is necessary. What do you think? (via Feature Shoot)

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Sponsored Post- Tilt-Shift Photography- How To Make Everyday Images Look Like Miniature Worlds

Tilt-Shift

Tilt-shift photography is becoming increasingly popular in the mobile photo editing world. Even if you’re not sure what it is exactly, you’ve definitely seen it on your social feeds, and after reading this article, you’re definitely going to have a lot of fun with it.

Ready? Let’s jump right in!

So…what is it?
Tilt-shift photography is a technique that has several different uses, but nowadays, its most common use is simulating a miniature effect.

Okay, how do I do it?
Simulating tilt-shift photography is actually pretty simple. There are lots of mobile photo editors out there, but the one we are loving right now is called PicsArt Photo Editor. They just came out with a Tilt-Shift Tool that’s really easy to use, but this app really shines in all the different ways that you can personalize your shots. But let’s talk about what you need to do.

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Heavy Metal

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See those reflections shining in the chrome? Cheryl Kelley is a lady who strictly paints super awesome cars. California dreamin’!

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Andrew Hayes Creates Powerful Minimalist Sculptures From Books

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Tucson boy Andrew Hayes creates industrial sculptures from books. His work, reminiscent of minimalist pieces from the 1960s and 1970s, uses seemingly simple manipulations to create beautiful compositions employing the use of color blocking and the glorification of materiality.

Drawing inspiration from the American desert landscape in his earlier works, Hayes created the foundation of his style through fabricating steel. After his studies, Hayes worked as an industrial welder. While bouncing between jobs, he found himself as a Core Fellow at the Penland School of Crafts in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Bakersville, North Carolina. During this time, Hayes began to explore with various materials and forms, eventually finding his way to the book. He states,

“The book is a seductive object to hold and smell and run your fingers through. I am drawn to books for many reasons; however, the content of the book does not enter my work. The pages allow me to achieve a form, surface, and texture that are appealing to me. The book as an object is full of fact and story. I take my sensory appreciation for the book as a material and employ the use of metal to create a new form, and hopefully a new story.”

Sticking true to the celebration of form and material, Hayes work is truly striking and exudes a sort of power associated with fabrication. However, the introduction of the book allows a softness that is not only a fun play on an aesthetic staple, but also hints at a element of elusiveness — as he does not use the contents of the books — his work invites an aspect of imagination for the viewer. (via iGNANT)

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Celine Artigau Sees Neon Ghosts Everywhere She Looks

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French artist Celine Artigau is never really alone. In her series of manipulated photographs, “Goodbye Childhood”, she inserts spectral neon figures into photos of places with personal resonance. She says:

“These luminous characters are the souls of these places and ghosts of my childhood. They are like some lonely and abandoned imaginary friends that still follow me and haunt my life.”

Sometimes sweet, sometimes sad, the figures are simple outlines rendered with a neon glow. Their simplicity is what makes them work. Photoshopping “ghosts” into images—copying and pasting figures from one photo to another and lowering the opacity—has been done and done. With Artigau’s lost souls, the artifice is intentional; these wandering ghosts are meant to look illustrative and not realistic.

“Concerning the process, I use Illustrator to create my character and then Photoshop to integrate it into my picture. For my light effects, I use a mixture of layers and blur effects but the precise process is always different from one project to the next.” (Source)

In this series, Artigau has resurrected her childhood imaginary friends, allowing them to live in the in-between places and shine their light.

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