Get Social:

Jessica Joslin’s Dark And Delicate Sculptures Made From Bone And Metal

12324960943_1ceaf1cb70_c

7

12324809145_31ecafce31_z

11

For her series “Animal Alchemy,” the sculptor Jessica Joslin uses delicate found animal bones and antique metal works to build an array of animal acrobats, who play at balancing on balls and interacting with one another. As suggested by the work’s alliterated title, her pieces present a touching marriage of the biological and chemical. The incorporation of once-living materials succeeds seamlessly for Joslin’s choice to use nostalgic and decorative out-of-date metals; against the rusted filigree of fragmented keepsakes, the time-bleached animal bones appear right at home.

Joslin’s creatures navigate a fine line between fragility and aggression; in a piece titled Troy, the reimagines the deceptively merciful figure of the Trojan Horse, fortifying a spindly neck with bullet casings. Frail skulls wear protective armor as if preparing for some ancient battle. Against the sheen of durable metals, animal bones appear unexpectedly delicate despite their sharp teeth and clawing talons.

With breathtaking precision, the artist allows her bony creatures a single mark of vitality, filling their cavernous sockets with marbly eyes. The careful emotionality of the pieces ultimately makes them more gentle than frightful; the sculptor subtly realizes their personalities and relations with one another through the downcast slant or expectant focus of a pupil. A particularly poignant two-headed tortoise is only given two inner eyes, causing each head to fixate the other without access to a peripheral world. Similarly, a horselike beast gazes upwards balefully, pulling the heavy carriage behind him.

Each piece, beautifully fashioned with discarded bones and obsolete metalworks, performs for the viewer, imploring us not to forget their purpose. Take a look. “Animal Alchemy” is now on display in Scottsdale, AZ at Lisa Sette Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Photographer Swallows 35mm Film, Allows Digestive Fluids To Create Astounding Images

1

5

inside-out-spread-web

3

In an unusual attempt to explore their own digestive tracts, student artists Luke Evans and Joshua Lake swallowed single frames of 35mm film, folding each piece in a brightly colored capsule that allowed for the acids and bodily fluids to process the film with minimal risk of colon damage. Once excreted, the negatives were recovered, cleaned, and studied in detail by an electron microscope; ultimately, they were printed into giant black and white works.

The project, titled “I turn myself inside out” is an almost uncomfortably intimate and human exploration of the photographic medium. Normally, images are produced and processed by machinery, light, and chemicals, but this provocative series substitutes the artists’ own bodies and their fluids for the impersonal metal gears and glass lens of a camera.

The images themselves are so strong because of their unexpected three-dimensionality; while most film photographs flatten space, condensing foregrounds and background to create a compelling work of art, Evans and Lake’s work does the opposite. Each frame looks like a scientific image taken from a microscope. The digestive process and the resultant breakdown of the film’s emulsion afford each image its dimensionality, transcending the medium’s traditional reliance on light and shadow to convey space.

The most miraculous aspect of the work lies perhaps in the tension that arises between the intimate and vulnerable bodily process and the somewhat impersonal aesthetic of the resultant images. Once printed, the images become abstract explorations of tone and space, their apparently inhuman, unemotional form subverted only by the knowledge of their painfully visceral creation. What do you think: gross or cool? (via Wired and Oddity Central)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Martine Johanna’s Fairytale Muses

Martine Johanna is a Dutch artist with a beautiful portfolio of illustration work. While being heavily influenced by Art Nouveau, Johanna’s work is decidedly modern, juxtaposing organic, undulating waves of hair with geometric shapes, and delicately wrought shading with surprising peeks of color. Her drawings often depict seductive modern muses in fantastical worlds, proving that fairytales aren’t just for children anymore. 

Currently Trending

Pedro Varela’s Paintings Pour Onto The Walls And Spill To The Floor

Pedro Varela’s tightly packed paintings and installations leave no part of a room safe with paint on canvas, walls, floors and even ceilings.The imagery is clearly based on dense landscapes that one might find in a busy metropolitan area with massive skyscrapers sitting next to old art deco structures  that leave little space to build except up into the sky. Like a new city that is just taking shape Varela’s scattered yet dense city systems pour onto every surface acknowledging the galleries architectural structure yet denying to stop just because the wall ends and the floor begins. (via)

Currently Trending

Change


pro snowboarder and filmmaker ANDREW HARDINGHAM is a fun-crazy-wild rider who likes to get weird… and I love it. This video is what I like to call as a bio on his life. From first discovering fire to boobs, Andrew went through some changes…

Currently Trending

Carlo Bernardini’s Geometric Light Installations

Since 1996 Carlo Bernardini  has been using fiber optics to create bold and dynamic sculptures and site specific installations. Each piece uses the power of fiber optics to create minimal geometric line drawings which change as you walk around and into them and from certain angles become three dimensional drawings that come alive in space. (via triangulation)

 

Currently Trending

Kelly Allen’s Vibrant Microcosm Clusters

What looks to be collages are actually gouache paintings by Oakland, CA based Kelly Allen. By combining graphic and natural imagery she forms explosive new forms. Animals, insects, plants, fruits, molecular structures, and colorful geometric elements are assembled into vibrant microcosms. In her own words the works are “…symbiotic accumulations inspired by the systems within nature, and the human experience of recognizing beauty and inventing meaning.”

Currently Trending

Folded Magazine Margins Used To Create Abstract Sculpture

Gemis Luciani 8 Gemis Luciani 1

Artist Gemis Luciani takes the term ‘marginal’ literally in his art work.  His abstract compositions use regular magazines as a medium and material.  Luciani folds the pages of the magazines in a way to only expose the margins.  The simple method erases all text, layout and images.  He deconstructs the magazine making the marginal central.  Interestingly, the pieces often resemble a mix of minimalism and glitch art. His work walks the line of painting and sculpture.

Currently Trending