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Contemporary Color Field Collage Paintings

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Matt Rich resides in Boston, where he relies on color theory and a keen eye to develop his collage paintings: a visual cacophony of latex painted sheets cut into shapes then taped together.

Minus a frame or stretcher bars, these pieces surrender to vivid organic forms when pieced together. Sometimes, Rich even paints both sides before piecing, in order to “discover” accidental color pairings when flipping the work over.

Of his collection, Rich hopes viewers and visitors walk away with a poetic experience: “The warm glow of relief after effort or a crisis has been averted. An understanding that life will continue as before, but differently.”

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David DiMichele’s Monumental Art Installation Dioramas


Los Angeles based artist David DiMichele creates the fantastic. His environments follow contemporary trend to construct the monumental, to surround the viewer with visual stimulus. His work however is assembled, not in the cavernous halls and galleries of museums and art centers, but on a table in his studio.

DiMichele builds his environments as finely detailed dioramas and then he photographs them. His “pseudodocumentary” photographs comment on the way we see and experience the monumental art that it pays homage to. Not often can the public experience the physical sense of an enormous installation. Most commonly, we see the work through a reproduction or website. Working in this manner, DiMichele can take the “installation shot” much further. Controlling light, angle and composition. And heighten the experience.

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Bing Wright’s Photographs Of Sunsets Look Like Luminous Stained Glass

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Photographer Bing Wright‘s newest project, Broken Mirror/Evening Sky, is a series of images that capture the reflections of sunsets on shattered mirrors. Its colors, textures and overall composition resembles the appearance of luminous stained glass windows. The cracked glass seemingly generates doubled reflections, disjointed gleams and refracted light into shards of images that instantly reminds the viewers of an abstractive painting. The final prints, recently displayed at the Paula Cooper Gallery in NY, are displayed quite large, measuring nearly 4′ across by 6′ tall.

This new body of work is Marks Wright’s first return to color photography in almost a decade.(via Colossal)

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Paul Hazelton

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Paul Hazelton creates ephemeral, fragile sculptures from the cast-off tiny death material of household dust. All we are, is dust in the wind dude, as Bill and Ted so eloquently quoted once.

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Joe Van Wetering

Joe Van WeteringJoe Van Wetering is a 22 year old designer/illustrator that prides himself as a Chicago native. Right now he works for a little T-shirt company called Threadless, and if you haven’t checked out their tees before, you should probably do so right now. Joe is also damn good at Tetris and if that isn’t your cup of tea, he will take you down in ping-pong. Watch your back.

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Studio Visit: Tom Sanford

Tom Sanford had me over to his spacious basement studio in Tribeca this past Saturday.  I became aware of Sanford’s work in 2008 when I saw his show “Mr. Hangover” at Leo Koenig, Inc.  Tom’s main project is capturing our rapid-fire digital culture in the slow language of painting.  If it’s in the news – it’s likely fodder for his paintings.  When we watch TV, a pop star’s recent public tantrum is covered with the same attention as the death count in a war zone.  Tom doesn’t try to adjust the playing field between pop culture and world events – he conflates them.  But when that happens in a painting the dissonance is in your face in a way that it isn’t on TV.  For instance, in a new large-scale painting, Bill Murray (as a red capped Steve Zissou from The Life Aquatic) is being held at gun point by pirates off the coast of Somalia.  It’s inexplicably poignant – maybe because I care about the character from a movie?  Sanford speaks eloquently about how painting is slow media, and how we’re all enmeshed in fast media – he has a sign up in his studio that sums it up as “The worse the better.”

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Artist Zaps 15,000 Volts Of Electricity Into film To Create Beautiful Abstractions

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Brooklyn electronic media artist Phillip Stearns is exhibiting a new series of some pretty wild photography, and all produced without the use of a camera. Applying different household materials (bleach, vinegar, baking soda, hydrogen peroxide, salt, rubbing alcohol) before and after exposure to electrical currents, Stearns was able to produce some electrifying images. Applying 15,000 volts of alternating current directly to the surface of instant film, the electricity arced, ignited, and sparked, leaving beautiful patterns in the emulsion.

Stearns has been exploring his understanding of what a digital or photographic image is, through many different approaches. He sees images, sound and video not only as signals, or a way or producing something, but as raw materials to use and to exploit. In the Evident Material exhibition, he puts this theory into practice and explores the relationship between the human eye and the camera.

The sentiment that the camera is an extension of the eye is taken to an extreme. When looking through the Fujifilm FP-100c instant color film datasheets, the similarities between the layering of materials in the film and the layering of cells in the retinal is striking. Perhaps it is because the development of such film technologies parallels an evolving understanding of how the eye sees. (Source)

The similarities don’t end there. Stearns commented that the sparks he was experimenting with on the film stock, function in a similar way as the electric impulses in our eyes when processing images.

I find it curious and exhilarating that the impressions left behind after developing these extreme exposures so perfectly resemble networks of blood vessels in the retina. (Source)

Evident Material exhibition opened on November 15 at Transfer Gallery in New York and will continue until December 13. (Via The Creators Project)

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Brea Souders

We first featured Brea Souders work back in 2009. Since then Brea has been busy working on a whole new body of photographic works. Here’s a selection of some of our favorites.

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