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Paul Laffoley

Paul Laffoley

American artist and architect Paul Laffoley’s work is usually classified as visionary art or outsider art: most of his pieces are painted on large canvases and combine words and imagery to depict a spiritual architecture of explanation, tackling concepts like dimensionality, time travel through hacking relativity, connecting conceptual threads shared by philosophers through the millennia, and theories about the cosmic origins of mankind.

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Beautiful/Decay Lecture At Loyola University New Orleans This Friday!

If you’re in the New Orleans area this Friday come by Loyola University to hear me talk about the history of Beautiful/Decay and the trials and tribulations of DIY publishing. I’ll be discussing how B/D began, how we morphed from a zine to a internationally distributed publication, working in the art/design world, and all the various projects we’ve been involved in along the way. The lecture presented by AIGA, starts at 7pm, and is open to the public. Hope to see and meet all of you there!

AIGA Loyala University New Orleans
Monroe Library
Multimedia room 1
7pm

 

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Miriam Brumer

MiriamBrumer

Holy weird marker on mylar drawings! I love Miriam Brumer’s half stoner, half new age hippie-dreamscape, half crystal batik visions…oh wait that’s one too many halves…but considering her work is trying to channel a new planar dimension, I figure following ordinary mathematics would be boring anyways.

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Gregg Segal’s Poignant Portraits Of People Surrounded By One Week Of Their Own Trash

Gregg Segal - photography

Gregg Segal - photography Gregg Segal - photography Gregg Segal - photography

Do you know what kind of trash you accumulate over the course of a single week? For California-based photographer Gregg Segal, this question comes with a loaded context: there’s the irrefutable issue of Americans producing more trash than nearly any other country, as well as the large-scale ramifications producing so much waste has on the environment. In his new ongoing series, ‘7 Days of Garbage,’ Segal recruited friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances to compile a week’s worth of their personal garbage and allow him to photograph them lying in it. The photos are provocative, with Segal crafting beaches, bodies of water, and other natural settings to place emphasis on the garbage his participants were willing to bring to him. “Of course, there were some people who edited their stuff. I said, ‘Is this really it?’ I think they didn’t want to include really foul stuff so it was just packaging stuff without the foul garbage. Other people didn’t edit and there were some nasty things that made for a stronger image.”

Segal aimed to include people from different socioeconomic backgrounds, providing for a fascinating display of different kinds of trash. By shooting from an overhead angle, garbage strewn between created natural environments, Segal crafts startlingly personal portraits that are oddly still detached, conveying a more poignant message lying underneath. “Obviously, the series is guiding people toward a confrontation with the excess that’s part of their lives. I’m hoping they recognize a lot of the garbage they produce is unnecessary,” he said. “It’s not necessarily their fault. We’re just cogs in a machine and you’re not culpable really but at the same time you are because you’re not doing anything, you’re not making any effort. There are some little steps you can take to lessen the amount of waste you produce.” (via Slate)

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Making Cents: Robert Wechsler’s Intricate, Symmetrical Sculptures Made Out Of Coins

Robert Wechsler - coin sculptures Robert Wechsler - coin sculptures Robert Wechsler - coin sculptures Robert Wechsler - coin sculptures

American artist Robert Wechsler is a bit of a trickster. He takes everyday objects and transforms them into unexpected oddities and puzzling sights. He alters things and spaces, changing our understanding of the most understated and mundane item/place. His latest ‘practical joke’ Money was commissioned by The New Yorker and involves him cutting notches into different coins and slotting them together to look like atoms or complex cube shapes.

He has a fine sense of humor, and has practiced it extensively through previous projects. He has welded nine bikes together to create a giant carousel, re-plumbed a public drinking fountain that fooled thirsty members of the public, and instead of quenching their own thirst, watered nearby plants. Wechsler has also worked with currency before – he has cast a penny 30,000 times it’s size and replaced a manhole cover with it. He explains his motivations:

My focus is necessarily on the familiar. Comfortably accustomed to everyday objects and spaces, we are blind to their unseen beauty and elegance. Who looks at a shopping cart or a toaster for the object itself? This state of static expectations is fertile ground for surprise.  It is a conscious re-examination of my subjects that re-instates the novel back into the familiar.  This is the moment of surprise, the moment we discover what is unseen in what is always seen. In reverence for what initially appears modest we get a small glimpse of the boundless elegance of our world. (Source)

Adding another conceptual layer to the project, the Money series is exhibited on Cointemporary – the online gallery where you can purchase artworks with bitcoins. (Via Fubiz)

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Alexander Paulus’ Grotesque Paintings Are Straight Out Of A Child’s Nightmare

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The painter Alexander Paulus works in the grotesque, visualizing the ecstatic realm of human excess; in his disturbing images, desires of the flesh are celebrated as both revolting and magnetic. In the Primitivist style of Paul Gauguin and Paul Klee, the artist weaves viscerally-charged narratives that center around the erotic self. Through Paulus’s masterly, globular brushstrokes, the human body becomes a site of lust, gluttony, and a disgusting brand of pride.

Here, the allure and seductive powers of the flesh veer into excess and are thusly robbed of their beauty; a painting titled Blond haired blue eyed beauty imagines the female embodiment of Western beauty ideals as a rounded, egg-shaped monster, her ravenous, gummy open mouth revealing gnawing teeth. Similarly, in a piece titled Bette Davis eyes, the artist reinterprets the famed Kim Carnes song; in his rendition, the teasing seductress has an absurd about of tiny, beady eyes, and she takes the form of Queen Elizabeth I, a historical figure renowned for her spurning of male suiters.

Within Paulus’s intentionally crudely-rendered paintings lies a harsh indictment of modern culture. The works, dripping with satire, lay bare society’s worshipful treatment of sexual satisfaction; Crowing glory hole shows a roughly drawn anus adorned with a primitive crown, and Mount blue balls elevates thirsty and desirous phallus and testicles, complete with an ironic smiley face, to awesome level of the tallest natural peak. In Just the tip, thick, messy brushstrokes are also equated with the phallus and sexual desire left unquenched. In Paulus’s expertly seen world, the beautiful is merely an illusion, masking our basest desires. Take a look.

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Vinicius Costa’s Surreal Digital Worlds

Vinicius Costa creates glossy surreal worlds where anything is possible. In his densely rich and bizarre worlds plants take on human characteristics, pill bottles are turned into homes, and nature is replaced with richly frosted cupcakes and sweets. I’m not sure about you but I’d be first in line to live in Vinicius’ deliciously insane world.

 

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Sam Lubicz

Western Theory

I am breaking all the rules for Sam Lubicz. By that I mean featuring both his collage work and photography IN THE SAME POST. Why? Because they’re both good and because I believe a dialogue exists between the two. Despite being two different modes of expression, Lubicz’s collage work and photographs share a certain playful moodiness that emphasizes the relationship between the two mediums. Like maybe one’s a pug and one’s a schnauzer but they’re both dogs. I love dogs.

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