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Kimiko Yoshida

Torero by Picasso

Torero by Picasso

“Painting” is the name of this recent series of self portraits from Japanese artist Kimiko Yoshida. In each photograph, she attempts to replicate a character from a painting. More after the jump.

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Love-Padlocks

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In the spirit of love, love, love craaazy love, here’s an interesting little trend of the heart I found via Buzzfeed. 30 years ago, in the center of a little town called Pecs in the south of Hungary, lovers clamped padlocks to a wrought-iron fence as a symbol of their commitment to one another. Since that time, needless to say the trend has caught on around the world. I find the whole thing rather interesting, it reminds me a little bit of the padlock Nancy gave Sid as a symbol of their junkie-tainted pirate love gone bad. How does one propose the proverbial love-lock? “Honey, I think it’s time we head down to the town center and clamp a lock on it, what do you say!” What’s bizarre to me is the image of clunky, over-locked bars and gates, weighed down by the sheer magnitude of their unwieldy weight, somehow doesn’t look so sweet. It actually kind of looks like something your psychotic ex-girlfriend would do right before she hacked into your Facebook account, found out you’re a cheater, and  slashed your tires.

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ADAM NIKELWICZ Sausage Sculptures & Oil Paint Covered Sliced Bread

Monument to Borscht

 A hermetically sealed canning jar containing a piece of sausage that is shaped into the sign of infinity

Adam Niklewicz creates humorous and poetic conceptual sculptures that reference his Polish heritage, his life long love affair with art ( He ate paint as a high school student), and his enginuity to create everything from an infinity sign to a working recorder out of Polish sausage. These and more projects by Adam can be seen after the jump.

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Photographing The Sweet Lolitas By Damon Casarez

Damon Casarez is a Los Angeles based photographer raised in suburban Diamond Bar, CA. In his recent series “Sweet Lolita”, Casarez covered the Dollyhouse Runway a “Lolita” based fashion show for Southern California Lolita fashion designers. His images give us a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes of this fashion subculture.

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OakOak Playing With the City

According to his website, the street artist OakOak “is a French artist who likes to play with urban elements”.  Using simple means and materials, OakOak undermines his neighborhood with playful results.  He uses a minimal amount of actual original artwork, instead re-purposing signs, facades, cement blocks, chipping paint, and more.  OakOak transforms a neighborhood’s imperfections into its own adornments.  He says of his interventions:

“The less I intervene on the wall or the road, the better, especially if I can totally change the sense of the urban environment” [via]

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Michael DeLucia’s Incredibly Mechanical Geometric Drawings Are In Fact Hand Drawn

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Michael DeLucia draws with a scary talent for hand-rendering intense geometric grids and patterns. The Rochester born, Brooklyn-based artist (whose sculptures were previously featured here) creates drawings that reference shape, geometry and intersecting lines to create familiar and affecting moiré patterns. Utilizing carefully spaced lines, which intersect and diverge in different points, gives the work an almost meditative quality for the viewer, and more than likely for the artist during their creation. 

Perhaps unsurprising when considering the strength of depth and field in the drawings, DeLucia has received more attention for his sculptural work than the works on paper, though both quite obviously inform each other. Several sculptural works (Partial Sphere and projection for example) echo the same skill and detailed work as the drawings, and exist as both independent and linked artworks. (via butdoesitfloat)

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Maximo Riera Bold Chairs And Couches Made In The Shape Of Wild Animals

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Bringing nature and humankind together is the purpose of artist Maximo Riera. The Spanish artist is making chairs from wild animals such as elephants, octopus, rhinos, hippos and whales. An homage to the extraordinary creatures we too often take for granted.

It takes the artist approximately 11 weeks to manufacture one piece. With an average of 480 hours spent on the entire process. The process is complex. First, the 3D modeling and then the production achieved with the help of about 30 engineers grouped from five different companies. The animal-shaped chairs are made out of high dense polyurethane and held by a metallic frame. One piece weighs 350lbs.

Maximo Riera is highlighting through the making of these chairs the importance of nature. It’s a subtle metaphor for anyone who wants to hear it, that animals are a innocent presence and that it is human kind’s role to find tame. Like children looking at toys, we are delighted by the idea of perhaps owning one these chairs, or at least try them out.
‘this collection gives us an option of admiring what nature is capable of; this is the main reason why from the beginning I wanted to be faithful to the animal’s physique. this series is an homage to these animals and the whole animal kingdom which inhabits our planet, as an attempt to reflect and capture the beauty of nature in each living thing.’
What about the real ones? The question underlined here is, how can we come closer to nature and respect and live with it? (via Design Boom)

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Lisa NIlsson’s Internal Body Landscapes Made out of Paper

Lisa Nilsson’s works renders the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross sections. Her materials are Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time.

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