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Elliot Schultz Has Combined Embroidery And Turntables To Form A Groundbreaking Zoetrope Animation

Elliot Schultz - Mixed Media

Elliot Schultz - Mixed Media

Elliot Schultz - Mixed Media

What is more fascination than the moving image? How about a technique that creates moving images without any film? Artist Elliot Schultz has refined his own version of zoetropes, which is a method of filmless animation. This magic is created by taking a series of images and rotating them in a fast pace. Combined with the use of a strobe light, the sequence appears seamless as if it is the same image moving over and over. Schultz has taken this traditional technique and made it his own. He stitches wiggling worms, dripping water, and old men walking onto fabric in the shape of a circle. These ten-inch discs are the perfect size to be placed onto any turntable, and what is a turntable best for if not to spin! The embroidered images are rotated so fast that it appears just as if they are moving. Since strobe lights often go along with clubs, djs, and turntables, using this unique method almost seems a natural fit for a zoetrope.

Early inventions of the pin screen along with other alternative animation methods have deeply influenced Schultz’s work. He finds inspiration in engineers and animators involved with early cinema such as Claire Parker and Alexandre Alexeieff. Schultz is always experimenting with new mediums and techniques to further develop his interesting series. This incredibly innovative artist is somewhat of an engineer himself, bringing a bit of the history of animation into the contemporary world of electronic music and turntables. (via This is Colossal)

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Jacek Yerka Paints Dizzying, Four-Sided Rooms And Landscapes That Challenge Your Perception

Bathyscaphe

Bathyscaphe

Krysia's Garden

Krysia’s Garden

Boudoir

Boudoir

Gardener's Garden

Gardener’s Garden

Jacek Yerka is a Polish painter whose work melts pastoral beauty into worlds of fantasy and psychedelic dreams. Featured here is the series 4siders, wherein the four “walls” of each scene have been staged and fused together to create multidimensional spaces; rotate the images, and a different room (or landscape) appears. In “Budoir,” for example, the furnishings of an entire house loop dizzyingly around each other; in “Four Seasons,” a lonely bungalow slides from winter’s chill to spring’s awakening while the eye is drawn to the uniting, empty sky beyond. Both logical and disorienting, the 4siders paintings demonstrate how slight shifts in perspective can alter our notions of the rational world.

Blending the classically creative styles of Bosch and Bruegel with reality-bending contemporary art, it is no surprise that Yerka has achieved much recognition in the world of fantasy art — fantasy, after all, derives from a melding of history with the outer edges of the imagination. Some of Yerka’s genre-related accomplishments include collaborating with fantasy author Harlan Ellison in the compositions of Mind Fields (a collection thirty short stories accompanied by Yerka’s surrealistic paintings), as well as the notable reception of the World Fantasy Award for best artist in 1995.

Yerka currently lives in rural Poland with his family, where he paints his immersive dreamscapes in the shade of an “old and mysterious” apple tree (Source). You can learn more about his work on his website, Facebook, and Twitter. (Via Fubiz)

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Susanna Bauer Hand Stitches, Nurtures and Embellishes Fallen Leaves

Susanna Bauer - Sculpture 7 Susanna Bauer - Sculpture 4

Susanna Bauer - Sculpture 3

Susanna Bauer - Sculpture 8

For Susanna Bauer, a casual fall stroll can lead into a creative process. She transforms nature’s most fragile corpses into mini art sculptures. The leaves she delicately sews and crochets are brought back to life and hung off walls next to their fellow forest companions: pieces of woods and stones. With an astonishing dexterity she is able to roll, curve and assemble elements that were found dried and shriveled. She uses all of her concentration to operate on her findings. The artist takes the raw, emotionless leaves and patiently nurtures them, stitching back their wounds, unifying two different kinds of leaves together and taking care of the smallest details. Comparing the tenderness and tension of her work to the vulnerability and resilience of a human relationship.

She says she doesn’t work with nature but she collaborates with it. She respects flora, and her main will is to embellish the organic beauty that has fallen instinctively on her path. She closely examines how the fragile leaf, with no brutality, can be manipulated; and yet with a firm hand she pierces the dead element, making sure she leaves her imprint. Metaphorically, the work of Susanna Bauer is beyond interesting. To the eyes, it is a simple and precious vision, set in the immensity of a pumpkin toned abundant forest.

Susanna Bauer’s work will be exhibited at Salon Vert in Switzerland as part of a group show until August 2015 and at Lemon Street Gallery in Cornwall UK until September 2015.

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The Dark Wintery Wonderlands Inside Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz’s Snow Globes

Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz - snowglobes Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz - snowglobes Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz - snowglobes Walter Martin and Paloma Munoz - snowglobes

Proving that snow globes aren’t just kitschy souvenirs, artist duo Walter Martin and Paloma Muñoz create mini worlds covered by glass domes that are dark, gloomy, and slightly sinister. The scenarios they build are usually set in a stark wintery landscape and feature characters carrying out strange, ill-disposed acts on each other.

Working together since 1994, Martin and Muñoz source different figurines or model making elements, cut them up and re-assemble them as victims or criminals at a crime scene. They use plumber’s epoxy to build the base of the scenes, and cover it in a water resistant resin. Then, they fill up the globes with a water and alcohol solution, to create the authenticity of the object.

Taking inspiration from dreams, movies, and literature, the pair is happy to build on a bizarre or surreal narrative. Their scenes are very dark indeed: A man is caught in the act of dropping a boulder onto another man’s face, or we watch a woman suspiciously planting a dead tree in the snow, or two men vindictively dangling children over a deep dark well, all surrounded by the stillness of snow and winter. They see their snow globes as a celebration of that uneasy feeling you get when you are lost in a crowd, or left alone somewhere uncomfortable. Martin reflects on the environment that he grew up in and those feelings he experienced within them:

I always liked a good snowstorm, and so many of my best memories revolve around those occasions. The water is the thing in Norfolk and Virginia Beach. Everything that comes out of it, everything that you can do on it, or in it, is special. (Source)

Their globes and a number of other artist’s impressions of winter were also featured previously in a post on B/D. Click here to check out the different ideas of just what that wintery spirit is all about.

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Artist Writes The Word “Crisis” With €1000 Euro Coins On A Wall In Bilbao; The Work Disappears In 24 Hours

SpY - installation SpY - installation SpY - installation SpY - installation

The current political situation in Greece is on everybody’s mind at the moment. So the installation by Madrid based artist SpY couldn’t be more poignant. Made up of €1000 worth of 2c coins, he glued the coins to a neighborhood wall in Bilbao, spelling out CRISIS in bold, eye catching capital letter. Not surprisingly, given the current financial state across the continent, the passing public helped themselves to the work, and in less than 24 hours, all of the coins had disappeared.

An active urban artist since the 80s, SpY has been long involved in making subtle social commentary for all to see. He often installs large letters or text-based work on the sides of buildings, or creates shapes in ivy on walls; has wrapped up a police car in plastic and has also formed inaccessible areas that make people look twice. He interrupts people’s daily routes to work, or comments on the urban structures that surround them.

The bulk of his production stems from the observation of the city and an appreciation of its components, not as inert elements but as a palette of materials overflowing with possibilities. His ludic spirit, careful attention to the context of each piece, and a not invasive, constructive attitude, unmistakably characterize his interventions. (Source)

No doubt SpY’s techniques are effective – his irony and positive humor draw attention to pressing social matters, and in a non-aggressive way, make viewers think twice about their political and physical environment.

SpY’s pieces want to be a parenthesis in the automated inertia of the urban dweller. They are pinches of intention, hidden in a corner for whoever wants to let himself be surprised. (Source)

(Via Design Faves)

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Sarah Deremer Transforms Balloon Animals Into Their Real Life Counterparts

Sarah Deremer - Digital PhotographySarah Deremer - Digital PhotographySarah Deremer - Digital Photography

Bizarre and surreal animal manipulations are artist Sarah Deremer’s specialty. In her series titled Balloon Zoo, she transforms colorful balloon animals into the real life animals they represent. At first glance, you may think that the balloons have been painted to look hyper real. However, once you see the animal eye looking back at you, it is unmistakable that something is different about these balloon animals. Each creature is still in the shape of a balloon animal, but appears to have characteristics and features of its living counterpart. Their bright colors and fun shapes contrast against the visible textures of fur, shell, and skin. Both cute and a little odd, her quirky critters will have you staring, trying to decipher what is real and what is not.

After receiving her bachelor’s in photography, she took her work to the next level through digital manipulation. It is truly amazing how the details of the real animal bend and form around each part of the balloon version. Animal manipulation is a common theme in Deremer’s work, as she has other work titled Animal Food and Big Mouth Birds that will change your perception of what could be possible in the animal kingdom.
(via Juxtapoz)

“Balloon Zoo is a photo-manipulation project showing the realistic rendition of children’s balloon animals. The balloons are all re-imagined with realistic elements, made by combining photos of balloons with photos of the animals they represent.”
-Sarah Deremer

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Thomas Mailaender’s Uncomfortable Sunburn Art: Using Human Bodies As An Unsual Canvas

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Thomas Mailaender’s creative use of sunburns in his project “Illustrated People” combines the surface of the human body with already existing negatives of photographs to create stunning and unusual results. His project consists essentially of manufacturing sunburns: he does this by placing negatives on his subjects bodies, and shining a UV light on the designated area. The light from the lamp shines onto the subject’s skin and, around the negatives in such a way that the image from the negative is reproduced. This method yields fascinating results that draw your attention, not only because of the photographs on display, but also the way he transforms the sheer pain of sunburn into a work of art themselves.

His juxtaposition of human bodies and other people’s lives makes for a sort of temporary tattoo, where the subjects carry the story of a stranger on their bodies. This project is truly beautiful in both its conceptual and physical form in the way that it joins human lives both past in present in a single work of art. The use of a natural element, albeit artificially inflicted in this case, such as UV rays in combination with the man made element of photography adds another dimension to the artwork and depicts human bodies as both artwork and creators of art. The temporary nature of the sunburn is also fascinating in its own respect: once it disappears, so will the photographs, giving the process of regeneration of skin an active role in this piece.

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Can Pekmedir Manipulates Boneless And Seamless Flesh To Generate Intriguing And Repulsive Mutant Faces

Can Pekdemir - Photography 1 Can Pekdemir - Photography 2

The future predicts a change in the definition of gender as we know it. The new work of Can Pekmedir, a Turkish artist, could not fall at a better time. In his series “Bone Structure” he is examining how the human face would look like with distorted features and a seamless flesh.The result is intriguing and repulsive. The flesh and individual hair seen so close creates a feeling of discomfort. He manipulates photographs using an algorithm and three dimensional technology. Through 3D, the viewer has the freedom to examine the visuals, whereas when it’s in 2D, he is following the artist’s point of view.

Coincidence and failed experiences are at the premise of these artistic discoveries. Can Pekmedir is instinctively morphing recognizable body shapes to get harmony. “My studies are focused on reconstructing and deforming bodies by altering the physical conditions in which the entity exists and/or treating them as test subjects for virtual experiments”.
If these creatures are perceived as mutants, then in no time we can imagine being close to sci-fi and fantastic inhabitants populating the earth. The artist isn’t telling us a story, he is delivering a brutal reality of his artistic vision. We have the liberty to accept or reject it, but the fact that a change is yet to come in the way the human race will evolve is a crucial point to investigate. (via designfaves)

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