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Dan Britt & Joseph Pelling

The Lost Coin from Dan Britt on Vimeo.

Cartoons that look like they are for children but are really for adults are the best.  The colors and animation in this dryly funny fable are so natural, maybe its because the animators are from the UK and have old world taste.

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James Esber: You, Me, and Everybody Else

James Esber, a New York based artist, will be featured at the Pierogi Gallery in his new show: You, Me, and Everybody Else. James is known for addressing, through his work, the notions of distortion and perception. Colorful, incredibly wacky, but always engaging. So if you’re in the area, make sure to join James Esber this Friday Nov. 19th for the opening of You, Me, and Everybody Else at the Pierogi Gallery, located at 177 N 9th Street Brooklyn NY 11211.

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Christopher Charles Curtis’ Horror Movie World


Christopher Charles Curtis A.K.A. C3’s drawings explores a world the artist has created to better understand the darker parts of himself and humanity as a whole. This world is best described as a fairytale western with some horror film aspects. The characters are in a constant struggle to find their place in a world that is slowly crumbling all around them. As they foolishly try to save this world they find that not only are their attempts futile but their very efforts are contributing to the decline in civilization. It is a basic story of the few vs the many, honor and glory vs power and corruption.

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Wendy MacNaughton

Wendy MacNaughton

 

Wendy MacNaughton uses a classic method, pen and ink (in this case, watercolor) to sketch out the world around her. I love the mix of color, text and honesty that makes up her work.

 

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A Traveling Installation Series Inspired by Famous Works of Architecture

 

 

French artist Xavier Veilhan is staging a series of site-specific sculptural installations in various international, architecturally significant structures as part of a project entitled Architectones. To kick off the series, the artist is presenting works at the Richard Neutra VDL Research House in L.A. The works on view at the Neutra VDL Research House (exhibit closes September 16th) are inspired by modernity, Richard Neutra, and the house itself, where the artist stayed with his family while completing each piece in the show; an echo of Neutra’s family life. Curated by Francois Perrin, the exhibit features models of cars and boats, a metal flag, and more.

Over the next year, the VDL project will be followed by Pierre Koenig’s Case Study House #21 (1958); the roof of Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse, Marseille (1952), (set for spring 2013); St. Bernadette du Banlay Church (1966) by Claude Parent and Paul Virilio, Nevers, France; and the Melnikov House (1929) in Moscow. After the jump, more pictures of the show. (Photographs by Joshua White).

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Eliza Bennett Embroiders Her Own Hand In Courageous Statement About Women Laborers

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For the artist Eliza Bennett, her flesh is her medium; in embroidering her palm with thick threads, she hopes to explore the ways in which we view gender roles. Her hand, swollen and bruised by her own careful work, is titled “A Woman’s Work Is Never Done,” and her gruesomely precise handiwork serves to remind the viewer of the strife of women laborers, many of whom are paid far less than their male counterparts.

Embroidery, like most traditionally female crafts, is often belittled and considered frivolous, but Bennett’s representation of women’s work is urgently and painfully profound. By literally—and unflinchingly— penetrating her own epidermis, the artist subtly subverts the notion that the efforts of women are superficial or shallow.

Building upon these themes of gender constructs, Bennett’s project blurs the lines between the private realm, coded female, and the public realm, coded male. In many ways, her skin serves as the bridge between the internal self and the external world; in embroidering it, she makes a public spectacle of her own personal narrative. As if reading her own palm, she traces its lines in various soft colors, creating intricate patterns and granting certain patches of flesh both psychological and aesthetic importance.

Bennett’s pointed social critique of ideas of femininity is made stronger by the intimate nature of the work. Feminist scholar Betty Friedan once explained that in the battle for gender equality, the personal lives of women must be made political, that internal struggles must be made visible. “A Woman’s Work Is Never Done” is a poignantly simple execution of this idea; here, Bennett weaves a painful visual story onto her hand, stretching it outwards for public consideration. (via Hi FructoseDesign Boom, and anti-utopias)

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Marcie Oakes’ Soft Explosions

Marcie Oakes is a young painter dwelling in the suburbs of Chicago. Her voluptuous, deeply layered abstractions often reference landscape but can often turn into something un-namable. These explosive images are penned using a wide variety of applications and painting techniques that build a surface that can only be truly appreciated in person. Jump.

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“Literal Street Style” Series Mocks Street Fashion Photography

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Designers and stylists Isla Bell Murray and Jessica Saia recently featured some bold and edgy San Francisco street fashion over at The Bold Italic. In an effort to correct “street style” blogs that have used streets and their permanent fixtures as mere background to “people style,” the duo have captured a variety of popular and stylish items found on the streets, complete with quotes from the fashionistas they encountered. This humorous series lightheartedly mocks street fashion photography, reminding us not to take ourselves too seriously.

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